Newsletter

  • Create an E-newsletter From Source Documents

    This article describes the procedure to take the two source documents for the FHA newsletter, which are in a dialect of Microsoft Word and Portable Document Format (PDF) formats, and create the emailed "e-Newsletter". All of the procedures described below assume you are logged into the back end as a Manager, Administrator, or Super-Admin.

    Preserve the Source Documents

    When you receive the source .doc and .pdf files from one of the Editors, upload it to the website into the directory /images/newsletter/. These documents are named 

    nl_mar12ORIGINAL.doc for the .doc file, and
    nl_mar12ORIGINAL.pdf for the .pdf file.

    (Of course replace "mar12" by the applicable month and year.)

    This is a permanent repository for back-issues. The editors never thought a back-issue repository was important, but I disagree.

    Also make a local copy of the Word document so you can cut-and-paste from it later. 

    The Word copy of the newsletter is dodgy. It may originate in a word processor other than Word, so quirks will be apparent when the file is opened in Word. Among the quirks are graphics that are pinned to a page location and text boxes that don't flow across columns or pages, and thus do not display properly on your word processor.

    Editing (or the lack thereof) quirks include article titles that are in different case styles (all upper, title case, or no convention),  and variable treatment of links. Title inconsistencies are handled automatically by CSS, which converts all <h3> markup to all uppercase. The links need to be addressed manually.

    The first thing to do is to transfer each article from the original .doc file into Joomla. You will notice that there are about six sub-categories under the Newsletter category four of them correspond to the major categories of newsletter articles which, at this writing, are "Front Page", "Around the Village", Fearrington Cares", and "Outside Fearrington". It is helpful if, after logging into the back-end (Administrator) section of the website, you click Content, then Articles to display all Joomla articles, then from the Categories drop-down list, select the Newsletter subcategories one by one as you are copying content from the Word document to Joomla articles. For this procedure, don't worry about the printed newsletters' "sub-sub-categories" like  "The Arts", 'Reading", etc.

    You will be copying all articles from "Inside Fearrington", "Outside Fearrington" and "Fearrington Cares" into the Joomla document category "News/Events" for the Website Editor to put in order on the site. Open the the Article Manager display and select the "News/Events" category. Once you see all the articles in the "News/Events" category, click the column heading "ID" on the far right side to sort the articles by ID number. Then click "ID" again to see in reverse order of ID. This will show all the articles with the most recent "News/Events" article to the oldest, for every newsletter we've put into the system.

    Make a note of the "id" number of the top-most (most recent after you've sorted the list) article. You will use this "id" number later.

    Note that the "alias" for each article, which is shown below the article title, is a lower-case rendition of the title, prefixed by "yyyy-mmm-", the four-digit year and three-character month in which the article appeared. This prefix is needed because Joomla will not allow storing an article with the same alias within a category. It is also handy if you ever need to retrieve an article, knowing about when it was published. You are now ready to begin copying articles from Word into Joomla. Before you start, it is helpful to open the PDF copy of the paper newsletter in a separate window so you can refer to it while moving text into Joomla.

    Copy Articles from Word into Joomla

    [Note: This procedure seems to be about as efficient as I could make it - if you find a better one, please edit this as needed. It looks imposing, but when you get into the rhythm of it, you can do most articles in a minute or two.]

    1. Be sure the article you are copying into Joomla has the Category "News/Events".
    2. Click the icon for New (article) on the article list. The new article page will open with the article list page's category copied from the Articles List page.
    3. Edit-cut (or Ctrl-X) the entire article including the article title from the Word document and edit-paste (or Ctrl-V) it into the new-article's "Article Text" box. (Use Cut, not Copy, so as material is moved from the Word document to Joomla, the Word document turns (nearly) empty. This ensures that you copy all the articles, and only copy them once.)
    4. Edit-Cut (Ctrl-X) the article title from the Article Text box, and edit-paste (Ctrl-V) it into the Title box and into the Alias box immediately following. Don't worry about upper/lower case in either box.
    5. Edit the Alias box to add the "yyyy-mmm-" prefix to the alias. Again, ignore case.
    6. Move to the Article Text box and remove any extra space before the article text and after the last visible character in the article text. (Extra spaces and lines cause formatting anomalies in both the email and the online article.)
    7. If the article contains dates and times of an event, these should be boldfaced. See the paper newsletter's PDF window to confirm what is bolded there and replicate the formatting in the Joomla article.
    8. Titles of book, other publications, and films should be italicized.
    9. For aesthetics, lists should be recast as bulleted or numbered lists so the first line of each item is outdented from the rest of the list item text.
    10. Spaces placed before each paragraph (indentation) should be removed.
    11. Links to websites and mailto: links should be "live". That is, clicking them within an email ought to send the user to the link (open in a new window if the link is not a fearringtonfha.org address), or should open the user's email client if a "mailto" link. Mostly you will need to add these links manually, although when the original document is created with Word, the links are often correct as entered.
    12. Correct any typos that you see. There are usually a few in every newsletter.
    13. Scan the article once more and correct any remaining typographical, layout, or other problems, and correct them if so.
    14. Click the "Save and New" (or "Save and Close") icon atop the screen, and go to the next article.

    Article Notes:

    • Skip the Directory Updates. Online users do not need them, and they are a pain to generate manually. If the need arises, you can always use the Directory Changes link in the top menu's Admin drop-down to automatically generate the directory changes. At this writing, Mike Cotter uses that page to generate the piece for the newsletter.
    • Skip the Calendar grid. It will not copy-and-paste correctly.
    • Fearrington Cares articles generally need some extra formatting to try and match their original formatting in the paper edition. This includes bolding and/or italicizing subtitles and reformatting their bulleted lists.

    When all articles have been copied into Joomla, close the Articles screen and go to the AcyMailing Newsleters screen.

     Create a New Newsletter from the Template - Setup

    1. Open the Acymailing Newsletters page and click New. You should see the death notices template appear in the Article Editor's Article Text box.
    2. Click the Template button at the top right. Then click the "FHA PDF Newsletter", and the skeleton cover email will appear in the editor box.
    3. Fill in the Title box with "FHA Newsletter - March 2012" (using the correct month and year).
    4. Edit the skeleton cover email to correct the month and year.
    5. Click Save.
    6. On the right, the "Lists" tab is open. Click the "Yes" button under Recipient for the "FHA e-Newsletter" List Name.
    7. Click the "Attachments" tab.
    8. Use the "Choose file" button to upload the newsletter from your hard drive (not from the website).
    9. In the page's top icons row, click "Preview/send".
    10. On the upper left of the resulting "Send/edit" page, under "Send a test to", be sure the test is send to your email address and click "Send a Test".
    11. Check to see that the email is as you expect, including the cover material having the correct e-NL date and the PDF attachment is attached has the correct PDF file.
    12. When the email looks OK, on the "Preview/send" page, click "Schedule", and choose a date and time when the e-NL is to be sent, and this completes preparation of the e-NL.
    13. Re-open the Acymailing Newsletters page and note for later the "id" of the newsletter you just scheduled; that's the number in the right column.

    Upload New PDF File and Change Website Links

     Four small tasks need to be done:

    1. FTP the PDF document into the website directory /images/newsletters with the name "yyyy_mm.pdf" where (yyyy= the year of the newsletter, e.g., 2014, and mm=the month of the newsletter, e.g., 02 for February), e.g., "2014_02.pdf".
    2. Change the Top Menu's Newsletter link (under "News") so it points to the new newsletter.
    3. Edit the file /fhaphp/tryENL.php and change the line beginning "$mailid=" around line 65 so the number to the right of the "=" sign is the id number of the newsletter you noted in step 13 above. Save the file and upload it to the website. This program is activated when someone clicks "Send e-Newsletter" under "News" on the top menu, and this change to the program makes it send the current newsletter when invoked.
    4. Add the new newsletter to the Newsletter Archive linked under "News" on the top menu: Open "Weblinks" under "Components" on the Administrator site. Click on the previous newsletter's link (identified by a title of Month and Year, and with category "Newsletter Archive (PDF)". Edit the title to be the current newsletters month and year. Clear the Alias field. Change the link address to point to the yyyy_mm.pdf file you uploaded, and click "Save as New". DO NOT click "Save" because "Save" will overwrite the previous month's link with the current month, and in this case you'll have to recreate both.

    Change All Newsletter-Derived Articles' Titles

    Recalling the "id" number of the most recent article in Joomla BEFORE you added any of the current articles, open the following page:

    http://www.fearringtonfha.org/titles.php?id=nnnn

    but replace nnnn by the id number of the article that precedes your current newsletter articles.

    This page peruses each article with an "id" greater than nnnn and changes its case to Title Case:

    "Capitalize all words in titles of publications and documents, except
    a, an, the, at, by, for, in, of, on, to, up, and, as, but, it, or, and nor."

    The page also corrects some words that the program's brute force method would make incorrect, like "AAUW", "A.M. Book Club", etc. It prints a list of titles it actually changed. You should peruse these to be sure the titles are still correct, and correct any that are incorrectly capitalized.

    Notify the Web Content Editor (Julia Hardy, at this writing) that the newsletter has been copied into Joomla, and you're done.

    Timing

    If you've read this entire article you could easily imagine days of drudgery. Actually, with fairly nimble fingers, and once you get into the rhythm of it, it only amounts to 3-4 hours of drudgery (more articles=more time to complete), 11 times a year, so it's quite manageable.

     


    Updated 1/10/2014 to reflect that the e-Newsletter is sent as a PDF attachment to a short email body from a new template.

     

  • FHA Newsletter, April 2021

    fearrington NL logo

    FEARRINGTON  HOMEOWNERS  ASSOCIATION  NEWSLETTER
    April 2021        Volume 40        Number 4

     

     

    President's Message

    Doggone Carl

    Doggone It!

    When I was a boy, one of the few expressions of irritation permitted by adults (at least in their company) was “Doggone it!” I still use the expression, although I do slip occasionally. But in a time when our television and movies celebrate vulgarity to attract viewers (some of those expressions even suggesting anatomical impossibilities), it now seems such a sweet expression. Besides, I like “Doggone it” because it contains the word “dog,” which always has a positive note to me.

    I am presently in need of an expression of dismay and irritation because, “Doggone it!,” the transition from our old management company to Associa HRW has been much more troubled and difficult than any of us thought it would be. FHA considered multiple companies, did reference checks, and took considerable care to validate Associa HRW as our management company. But the transition issues still surprised us.

    Every single member of the FHA Board puts in a lot of time and effort to preserve things as we all want them to be and to improve many areas. We depend on our management company for many things. They receive residents’ dues; they pay the FHA bills; they help manage vendors and projects; perhaps most importantly, they respond to questions from residents; they help with requests for things like building projects, repairs for some residences, or with covenants issues.

    So, we are working diligently with Associa HRW to get things right and identify mutually agreeable solutions for some of the larger issues:

    • There were errors in names and ZIP codes on initial packages to residents, which caused issues in trying to pay FHA dues; that was fixed. There is work still to be done to get things set up properly for many residents, but progress is being made. The good news is that once everything is working, residents will not have to repeat the process.

    • Just two weeks into her first month, our Assistant Manager quit. A new Assistant Manager, Darla Sandoval, is now in place. Based on results and comments from residents, she has been extremely helpful in solving problems.

    • The Associa HRW Manager initially assigned to oversee FHA dues had issues that took him out of action for much of January and some of February—additionally, he may not have been the right person for the job. Associa HRW has now replaced that person with a brand-new Manager, Kathy Wood. It is early yet, but our impression is that she will be particularly good in this role.

    • Our former management company had many issues with tracking financial operations and getting bills paid, which is one of the major reasons we chose a new company. Poor information from that prior company, and some delays by Associa HRW, have made getting things right even more difficult and frustrating than we had imagined. Our Treasurer is working diligently with Associa HRW to resolve these problems, and we are starting to see success.

    So, “Doggone it,” we are too stubborn to let these kinds of issues stand in the way of getting things right! We hope to look back in a month or so and breathe a deep sigh of relief.
    This is not the end, or even the beginning of the end, but it may be the end of the beginning. (Churchill)???


     

     

    The Belted Gazette

    The Belted Gazette is the official publication of our Fearrington Homeowners’ Association (FHA), produced by and for residents of Fearrington Village in Pittsboro, NC. The Gazette contains community news, reports from FHA Board members, items of interest to residents, and announcements of club and neighborhood activities.

    The Gazette is published electronically eleven times a year (July/August is a combined issue). A PDF copy of the current issue and back issues can be found on the FHA website (fearringtonfha.org).

    Submissions

    Content deadlines are the 15th of the previous month. All persons submitting content will receive a confirmation email.

    Send submissions to: editors@fearringtonfha.org.

    Do you have content for an upcoming newsletter? Email us at the above address and we will send you the Newsletter Guidelines.

    Newsletter Staff:

    Jan Kowal Ann Melchior
    Leslie Palmer Deborah Repplier
    Jackie Walters  

    Printing and Distribution:

    Carol Kurtz Barbara Amago
    Fearrington Homeowners’ Association
    Board Members

    Our Fearrington Homeowners’ Association (FHA) is a volunteer, non-profit organization dedicated to the health, safety, and welfare of residents. In addition to fostering resident participation, the Board is responsible for maintenance of common property and covenant enforcement. For additional details, including job descriptions, visit the FHA tab on our webpage (fearringtonfha.org).

    Officers  
    President: Carl Angel
    Vice President: Rose Krasnow
    Secretary: Pam Bailey
    Treasurer: Tony Daniels
    Directors  
    Communications: Gordon Pitz
    Community Affairs: Chris Jaeger
    Covenants: Eric Frank
    Grounds and Landscaping: Jesse Fearrington
    Health, Safety and Security: Warren Ort
    Infrastructure and Facilities: Mark Haslam

     


     

    From the Editors

    Meet John Webster, Our Naming Contest Winner

    By Ann Melchior

    John_Webster

    John Webster with his folk-art illustrated mantle featuring the Fearrington Galloways painted by his friend and trompe-l’oeil artist, Kate Ladd, of Pittsboro. John’s beloved Galloways are featured prominently throughout his home.

    When told his entry, The Belted Gazette, was the winner of our “Name the Newsletter” contest, John Webster enthusiastically emailed back: “I’m both surprised and pleased all at once! I have had a love affair with the Belted Galloways for over 45 years!”

    A few days later I sat down with John at his home for an interview. I learned the story of how John developed such affection for the cows we Fearringtonians consider our community mascot. That is when I realized John’s winning our naming contest was kismet.

    But first, a bit about John. For many Villagers, Boston-born John Webster needs no introduction. John and husband, Kimball Page (“Kim”), moved to Fearrington in August 1986. This was a time, John hastens to add, when Fearrington was a small village and most residents knew one another. After renting homes on Creekwood, the couple bought homes on Brampton Close and later on Spindlewood. Eventually sizing down, they ended up at John’s current home on E. Camden, across from the park. In earlier days, both John and Kim were active Fearringtonians known for hosting fundraisers for local non-profits. John also served as the president of Fearrington’s Garden Club.

    John’s home is filled with antiques, collectibles, trompe-l’oeil, and mementos of the Galloway cow. All are good memories of the life he shared with Kim, who passed away in September 2018 at the age of 89. John is mostly retired from a varied career that included being an antique dealer. More recently John worked for Southern Seasons, the now-closed Chapel Hill gourmet store where he was a manager and buyer. John smiles recalling how he talked Kim into working at Southern Seasons too, “for something to do in his retirement,” and how customers were charmed by Kim, a bon vivant with interesting stories.

    What first brought John and Kim to Fearrington? Florida friends pondering a move asked the couple to check the development out. They did so in June 1985. Both were impressed with the little English-themed village that came into view as they turned onto Village Way. And that’s when John saw them: Fitch’s Galloways grazing next to the silo. John immediately recognized the unusual black and white cows, which he acknowledges colored his positive impression of Fearrington that day. In fact, John and Kim were so charmed by Fearrington on that visit they decided to move here, even though their Florida friends didn’t.

    So, you might wonder, why was John so taken by the grazing Galloway cows that day? This story requires us to delve a little further back in time.

    In the mid-1970s John and Kim moved to a rural Vermont home in Waitsfield, a half hour from Stowe. Their neighbor, a farmer, was a man named Werner von Trapp. Now the story gets a bit…musical.

    This neighbor was the same Werner von Trapp who, in his childhood, was a member of the Trapp Family Singers. This singing troupe was popularized in the 1959 Broadway play The Sound of Music with Mary Martin, and later in the 1965 movie with Julie Andrews. As readers may recall, the von Trapp family fled to the United States from Austria in the 1940s where, when not performing on the road, they ran a lodge and music camp in Stowe. So yes, Werner von Trapp, John Webster’s neighbor, was of the musical von Trapp family. According to Wikipedia, Werner was the 2nd oldest son of the singing children (and referred to as “Kurt” in the movie). After serving in the US Army during WWII, Werner became a dairy farmer, raised six children with his wife, and retired to Waitsfield, VT where he raised…Scottish heritage Galloway cows.

    And that’s the nexus. Werner von Trapp’s dairy farm was situated next to John and Kim’s Vermont home. “That’s the first time I saw a Galloway,” John recalled, “they were called Oreos.” John has studied the Galloway’s origins and knows that this cold-tolerant, docile breed was popular in nearby Maine where, he notes, RB Fitch acquired his first Galloways.

    That is why John “felt it was home” when he and Kim first drove into Fearrington Village and saw Fitch’s cattle grazing. It brought back fond memories of living in Vermont with the von Trapp’s Galloways right next door.

    Despite spending over two hours with John, I felt the interview ended too soon. As a newcomer to Fearrington, I enjoyed hearing about the Village “back in the day” when everyone knew one another and RB and Jenny Fitch were commonly seen around the ‘hood. I will now think of John, and his passion for the Galloway, whenever I walk or drive by the ‘Oreo’ cows grazing in our Village fields.


     

     

    From Our FHA Board

     

     

    video conference 5230746 640Plans for April Open Meeting: Beechmast Pond

    On April 27th, at 7:00 pm, the FHA will host the second open meeting regarding the future of Beechmast Pond. As a reminder, the FHA is considering whether to keep the pond as is, to turn it into a wetlands, or to restore it to its original state—a free-running stream. After the next open meeting, a survey will be sent to residents, and the Board will make a decision about which option to pursue.

    Since the first presentation, we have learned more about the availability of grants that would cover some of the costs. Here’s what we know now:

    • There are two state grant programs that are considerations for our project. One accepts applications in January, and the other accepts applications year-round.

    • We expect that it will take a year to obtain a grant and then another year to obtain all necessary construction permits. So, this is a two-year project or longer.

    • All of the necessary design work has been completed to submit a grant application. Each grant application will cost about $1,500.

    • Grants are available for the wetlands conversion, but there are fewer opportunities, and they would cover less than the 50% contribution that could be available for restoring it to a stream.

    • The grant has to be submitted through a non-profit partner with an environmental mission statement. They would technically become the applicant for the grant. There are a number of such agencies that would be appropriate.

    You can read more about the project in the October newsletter, and in the summary of the first open meeting in the March newsletter.

    You will receive any further information we obtain and an invitation to register for the open meeting closer to the meeting.

    —Jesse Fearrington (grounds@fhaboard.org)

     

     

    What a Difference Our Fearrington Volunteers Makegetinvolved larger 2 orig

    Fearrington homeowners, I have some good news for you! The Hospitality and Service Center will be re-opening on a limited schedule in April. We’re thrilled that many of the former volunteers have agreed to return. All will be wearing masks, of course, and everyone is at least two weeks’ post-second vaccination. We’ll limit visitors to one at a time.

    These volunteers can provide you with useful tools, like access to a color copier and even colored paper if you like. There’s also a fax machine if you need it. Our Hospitality Center is a great source of information about Fearrington and the surrounding area—newcomers will find it invaluable.
    As long as you wear a mask and you’re at least two weeks past your second vaccination, we welcome you to drop by The Gathering Place—or call with your questions between the hours of 9 am to 12 pm.

    Available Volunteer Positions

    Would you be willing to help out at The Hospitality Center? We’re looking for at least one more person to help staff. Additionally, our current volunteers may be looking for alternates to fill in on an occasional basis, on days they cannot make it. If you’re interested in learning more about these opportunities, please email me at the address below.

    Kudos to Neighbors Who Keep Fearrington Clean

    On a different note, many thanks to the neighbors who can be seen picking up trash along our roads and pathways. They carry a trash bag and a grabber with them whenever they go out walking. They too make a difference in the quality of life here in Fearrington. Although these folks wish to remain anonymous, I want to congratulate them on their community spirit and encourage others to join them in keeping our village looking good. If everyone does their part, we’ll continue to have a beautiful neighborhood.

    Easter & Our Egg Hunt

    This year we decided it was too early in the recovery efforts against Covid-19 to hold our VERY popular Easter Egg Hunt. We’ve been very fortunate here in Fearrington Village to have a healthy community, and we don’t want to jeopardize that now. Please wear your masks and keep up the social distancing a while longer, so we can all survive this pandemic. And next year, we’ll plan for our best Easter Egg Hunt yet!

    In the meantime, have a wonderful Easter, and stay healthy!

    —Chris Jaeger (community@fhaboard.org)

     

    successJoin a Village Improvement Team!

    Your FHA Board is very appreciative of your recent responses to our Community Assessment Survey, which have helped us identify what defines our mutual Fearrington Village vision.

    Key findings of the Survey have led the FHA’s Long Range Planning Committee (LRPC) to identify four new initiatives (along with the issue of Governance) that have wide community interest and can enhance life in our village. The four proposed initiatives are:

    • Walking Paths & Nature Trails

    • The Gathering Place

    • Village Attractiveness & Renewal

    • Aging in Our Community

    In the recent Community Survey, 60% of residents stated that, depending on the topic, they would consider providing assistance to find solutions for the issues our village is facing. Our Board fully supports each of these four initiatives. To accomplish them, we need your help. Only with active community participation can we achieve our shared goals. Your engagement will help drive success. Now we are asking for your assistance. We strongly encourage you to consider joining a team focused on the initiative that interests you most.

    If you are able to invest your time, energy, and abilities over the next three to four months, the LRPC would be delighted to consider your participation on one of these projects.

    Fearrington Village Needs YOU! Learn more about volunteering.

    —Long Range Planning Committee (c/o treasurer@fhaboard.org)

     

     

    Using the FHA Website: The Directory

    Last month I explained how to create an account on the FHA website and log in. This month I’ll show you how to use one of the most popular and useful features of the website, the Directory.

    If you are reading this on the web page version of the newsletter, you can see the link to the Directory on the blue menu bar at the top of the page, fourth item from the left. If you have not logged in, you will find that you have access only to very limited features of the Directory, but if you do log in and hover your cursor over that item on the menu, you will see that there several options.

    Figure 1 : Options for finding the person you are seeking.

    You may want to explore all of these, but for now I focus on the first option, Find People. Suppose you want to find a friend’s email address. Select Find People, and you will see that there are a number of ways to find the person you are looking for (Figure 1). Again, you can explore them all, but let’s find the person by Last Name.

    In the box labeled, Start typing … type the first two letters of the person’s last name. You will see a list of all residents whose last name begins with those letters. Sometimes that’s all you need. If the list is quite long, type a third letter. Rarely will you need to type more than three or four letters to find the person (see Figure 2; the personal details are blurred here to preserve privacy).

    There is one strange quirk to the directory search process that you should be aware of and beware of. If it happens to you, it can cause a lot of frustration. Try the search for the same name one more time.

    Tap or click on the small red Clear button beside the input box. Type the first letter, “p”. Then, as quickly as you can, type two more letters, “i t”. When I do this, no names at all appear in the list. It looks as if there are no residents whose last names begin “pit”, which we know is not true.

    List of residents

    Figure 2: List of residents whose names begin with the first three letters.

    The problem is that the software managing the directory search cannot work correctly if the input characters are typed too quickly. They register correctly on the screen, but the search process that the directory search relies on is overwhelmed. This does not happen for every user, but when it does, it can be very disconcerting.

    The solution is simple. Just type the initial characters one at a time, quite deliberately. After I was trapped by this quirk, I eventually trained myself not to rush through the typing.

    There is much more to the directory you may find helpful. Your Neighborhood provides you with the directory information for everyone on your block. You can find this information for any block in the village. Select one of the 24 FHA areas from the dropdown list, and you will see the neighborhood listing for every block in that area.

    Under Find Other you can obtain the directory information for Block and Area Contacts in any area, as well as information for the various Service Groups or for FHA Board members.

    With all this information available to you, perhaps you can see why the Directory is considered to be so useful.

    Happy browsing.

     

     

    computer screenChanges to the FHA Website

    Each month the editors of The Belted Gazette (as it is now called) produce an attractive, interesting, and informative newsletter. It suffers from a significant problem, however. By the time you receive it, the newsletter will be at least 10 days out of date, and there is no way to update any of the articles.

    In the case of sudden, critical events, the Board will send an email to everyone. However, distributing emails to all residents whenever something happens is not feasible and can be very annoying.

    The most efficient way to provide up-to-date news is through the website, fearringtonfha.org/. With the help of the webmaster, Jim Brooking, we have been redesigning the home page so that it emphasizes this important function of the website. When you first connect you should see a few short items that address the most recent issues the FHA has had to address. These may range from recent CDC guidelines concerning the pandemic to upcoming community events. Following a brief heading and a date indicating when the item was posted, there will be a link to a longer article.

    We encourage readers who want to find the most recent information about any FHA issue to check the website. If there’s something important there, you will not need to search for it; it will be there on the front page. It is unlikely that something new will be posted every day, or even every week, but if something important has happened since the last publication of the newsletter, that’s where you can find out about it.

    Jim Brooking is also exploring other modifications to the appearance of the website. For the next month or so you may notice other changes taking place. Please feel free to comment on these changes, indicating whether or not you find them helpful. The purpose of the website is to be useful to you.

    —Gordon Pitz (communications@fhaboard.org)

     

     

    Associa HRW

    Associa HRW, the new management company, provided the following information about their new staff and their availability:

    The Associa HRW office is located in The Gathering Place. The phone number is: 919-542-1603. Office hours are Monday – Friday, 9:00 am – 3:00 pm. Kathy Wood is the new Community Manager. Darla Sandoval is the Assistant Community Manager. Please reach out to either if you need assistance with residents’ dues, with issues involving vendors, or with any of the tasks in which they assist the FHA.

    The HRW office will be closed April 5, to observe Easter.

    —Associa® HRW Management AAMC®
    4700 Homewood Court, Suite 380 Raleigh, NC 27609
    customercare@hrw.net

     

     

    Parking on Village Roads

    Our FHA Board has received a number of complaints from residents regarding cars being parked on the grassy edge of roads in the village. One road where this can become especially problematical is Creekwood, near the trail entrances. In some locations, parking on the edge of the road can be a safety hazard for walkers and for other drivers. It may reduce visibility and force pedestrians to walk in the road to pass the parked vehicles. In addition, when you park on the grass, your tires can dig up the grass and cause erosion. This is an especially serious problem now, following a very wet winter.

    We ask residents to be especially careful when parking along roads. Please think carefully about the suitability of locations where you want to park. Here are some questions to consider:

    • State law allows vehicles to park along state-maintained roads as long as other motorists can see them from a distance of at least 200 feet. This guideline applies to parking on any road. Can your vehicle be seen by other traffic?

    • The law requires vehicles to be completely off the road, but to avoid being a hazard for pedestrians, this may not be sufficient. Try to park at least 24 inches from the edge of the road. Can pedestrians get by safely?

    • To preserve our natural environment and protect the vegetation that we all enjoy, please avoid muddy areas, bare dirt surfaces, or any location where tires can cause damage. Are sure you are not harming the environment?

    If you are using the Creekwood trails, consider parking in the village parking areas and walking over to the trails. There is parking on Market Street, less than 200 yards from the trailhead at the corner of Creekwood and Village Way.

    The nature trails are an asset we can all enjoy, and we encourage residents to use them. Please bear in mind, though, that the natural resources can be very fragile.

    —Health, Safety, and Security Committee (healthsafetysecurity@fhaboard.org

     


     

    Features

     

     

    Scene Around Fearrington96LPwebBuffleheads in Camden Park

    Story and Photos by Gordon Pitz

    Early in March a female Bufflehead duck appeared on the lower Camden pond, joining Sophocles (Sophie) and the Mallards. A few days later she was joined by a male. The Bufflehead (a name derived from the abbreviation of Buffalo Head, so called because of the shape of the duck’s head) is not rare but is not often seen in Fearrington. They typically spend winters closer to the coast. In summer they head north to Central Canada for the breeding season.

     
    Buffie a

    Buffie

    Buffo a

    Buffo

     
    Buffie and Buffo 3a

    Buffie and Buffo

    Buffie and Buffo take off a

    Buffo and Buffie take off

     

    The breed is very small as ducks go, and it is not easy to get a close view. If you walk by the pond, they will quickly move to the far side. In any case, they may spend half their time fishing under water, disappearing for up to 25 seconds at a time. I managed to take these photos by parking myself in the shrubs on the north side of the pond, waiting for pedestrians to pass by on the south.

    —Gordon Pitz (communications@fhaboard.org)

     

    Fearrington PuzzlerFearrington Puzzler96web

    Welcome to the debut of the Fearrington Puzzler! We’ll offer this feature regularly for readers who enjoy puzzles and for anyone interested in learning more about our village. This month’s puzzler is brought to you by, most aptly, Jesse Fearrington. We hope you’ll put on your puzzler hats and do a bit of research, on the FHA site perhaps, as well as chatting with some of your long-term resident neighbors.

    What history is contained in the building that houses The Belted Goat?

    Stay tuned for the May edition of The Belted Gazette to learn the answer.


     

     

    Introducing Fearrington Book Groups

    Part 2 of a 2-part series

    By Katie Baer and Maggie Pearson

    This is the second of two articles introducing book groups in Fearrington Village and includes suggestions on how to start your own book group.

    The Belted Bookworms is unusual because it is composed only of men.

    Vince Tollers started the group in 2013, soon after he and his wife moved to Fearrington. “I was in a men’s book group when we lived in Rochester, and I wanted to create something similar when we moved here,” he said. Initially, he invited six men he knew from his neighborhood, and the group has since expanded to 13 members.

    “We organized as a way to talk about books of substance,” Tollers said. “We read widely, primarily fiction, but no ‘beach books’ or ‘fluff’.”

    Typically, meetings start with a member giving a brief summary and then opening up discussion. There’s always a good ebb and flow, and good listening skills are key to the success of the group, Tollers noted. “Members offer different points of view, and we respect and enjoy hearing those.“

    To identify likely good reads, the group often looks to lists of literary prizes, such as the Booker Prize and the National Book Award, but also chooses recently reviewed books and members’ suggestions.

    The Belted Bookworms’ list of books read over the past eight years reflects the group’s wide range of interests. Just two recent choices: The Nickel Boys by Colson Whitehead and Shuggie Bain by Douglas Stuart.

    Tea and Talk is a hybrid: a discussion group that relies on books, articles, and personal experience to support opinions on a variety of topics. “It is a group that likes to read but wants a more free-form organizing principle,” said one member.

    Each month a member chooses a subject for discussion. Members are not expected to do research for the meeting but to come with ideas that draw on books or articles to clarify points of view. One member said that she wasn’t looking for “an English class. The goal is to learn something new. Our members are well-read so using books to bolster ideas comes naturally.”

    Tea and Talk has six members who got together through word of mouth. Before the pandemic, the group met in members’ homes, and tea was always served.

    Bookends, a popular group affiliated with McIntyre’s Books, is a somewhat structured group directed by Wayne Pond, PhD, a Fearrington resident and former director of UNC’s Program in the Humanities and Human Values. It is open to anyone in the community and does not limit the number of members.

    Keebe Fitch, McIntyre’s manager and events coordinator, and Pond, developed a plan several years ago to foster a thematic approach to reading. Typically, several paired books (hence the name Bookends) emphasize a common theme, and readers read both books a month apart. “The dual selection often shows how authors in different time periods address a theme differently,” said Pond. Examples include politics: Washington, DC (Henry Adams--19th century) and Echo House (Ward Just--20th century) and friendship: Huckleberry Finn (Mark Twain) and Crossing to Safety (Wallace Stegner).

    Pond typically starts each session with a brief introduction and then invites discussion. “Wayne provides a sense of decorum, but always generates a lively discussion,” said Fitch. The sense of collegiality has been a hallmark of the group, according to John McDowell, who’s been a regular for several years. People who attend are a well-educated, diverse group, he noted. “The high quality of discussion makes it feel like a graduate seminar,” he said.

    Until Covid-19, the group met in McIntyre’s back room but recently revived in a virtual format.

    For more information about upcoming discussions via Zoom, contact Wayne Pond at (919) 542-9194. The selected books are available at McIntyre’s at a 20% discount up until the meeting’s date.

    How to Start a Book Group

    Book groups in Fearrington Village usually start with one or two friends who share similar interests in reading and discussion reaching out to others who share the same interests and whom they think would get along well in the group. Over time a decision is made about the ideal size for the book group.

    For newcomers, an ideal way to start is with an open book group such as Bookends, or groups supported by other independent bookstores or local libraries. (Check to learn if they are currently supporting book groups during Covid-19.) These larger venues offer a chance to meet like-minded people who enjoy the same kinds of books and who may want to start a smaller group. The Chapel Hill Newcomers also offers a way to meet other newcomers who might be interested in setting up a book group.

    Group members interviewed for this article emphasized that developing a sustainable book group requires some clear choices:

    1. What are the goals for the group - social, intellectual or both?

    2. What kind of books will the group read, and how will they be chosen?

    3. How often will the group meet and where? How long will meetings last?

    4. Will there be rotating hosts and rotating discussion leaders?

    5. Who will facilitate communication among members, such as keeping everyone up to date with changes to the schedule?

    6. Will the group be women-only, men-only or mixed?

    7. Will drinks or food be available?

    Other comments include:

    1. Ideally, total group size should be about ten so each meeting is assured of six or seven participants.

    2. Start each meeting with a short social period to find out how everybody is doing, but once discussion begins, avoid non-book related socializing. End the discussion by asking about other books members have been reading.

    3. Help all members feel valued by ensuring that everyone who wants to speak can do so.

    4. Over time a book group serves many purposes for its members: intellectual stimulation, a place to deepen relationships, a way to encounter new ideas. Members with open tolerant attitudes fare best because the most interesting discussions often are those where there are differences of opinion. A book group should be a relatively safe place for members to express their ideas.

    5. McIntyre’s offers a 20% discount on selected book group titles if the group supplies the bookstore with a reading list five weeks prior to its meeting. Call McIntyre’s for more information: (919) 542-3030.

     

     

    Newcomer to Fearrington Records Chatham County’s Historic Structures

    By Kimberly Steiner

    Chatham County has a rich architectural heritage worthy of exploring and recording for its residents. I discovered this when looking for ways to become acquainted not only with my new neighborhood of Fearrington, but with my larger community following my family’s move here in 2014.

    With a degree in art conservation, experience working in museums and archives, and an interest in history, I made new friends visiting the Chatham County Historical Association’s (CCHA) museum in Pittsboro. When a friend asked me to assist with some research for a project concerning the Bynum bridge, I dove into the wonderful local history collection at the Chatham Community Library.

    An impressive find was a book titled The Architectural Heritage of Chatham County by Rachel Osborn and Ruth Selden-Sturgill. A compilation of surveys of historic homes in Chatham County conducted between 1980-1986, it records an expansive effort to document historic homes in the county. Curious about which homes were still standing and which had not survived the past thirty years, I got in my car and started searching, paying attention to the townships around Fearrington.

    I found the ones still standing and was surprised at the number gone. I was also surprised to drive by distinctly older homes that had no entry in the book. Thinking about all the new development in the county and all the homes that might not survive the next thirty years, I contacted CCHA, met with Bev Wiggins, reported my drive-by findings and my concerns and proposed a project—a new survey of historic homes.

    During the original survey in the 1980s, 211 homes were surveyed in Williams, Baldwin, New Hope, and Center townships. Since then, 37 of those have been demolished or are in ruins. That’s at least one house per year and doesn’t account for the countless historic homes that were razed prior to the 1980s survey. We can only assume that number is substantial since the county was founded in 1771 and has seen significant growth over time. The construction of Jordan Lake, for example, relocated or demolished numerous homes in New Hope township. Additionally, I discovered 134 homes within these four townships not published in Architectural Heritage that I felt warranted documentation. In my own research, I also identified 33 homes no longer standing that were not included in the book, and I’m sure there are many more I’m unaware of.

    CCHA reviewed my proposal and graciously agreed to back the project. The goal of the project is to survey all homes within Williams, Baldwin, New Hope, and Center townships (including Pittsboro) that predate 1930. I began the project in October of 2019 and have surveyed all of Williams and New Hope townships to date. CCHA shares the surveys with the community through its website (Chatham County, NC Historical Association (chathamhistory.org)). Eventually, I will share my findings with the State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO), which maintains a map of historic structures throughout the state—a wonderful resource.

    The survey process requires some planning, organization, research, a pinch of willingness from homeowners, and quite a bit of gas for my car! I mail homeowners a letter a few weeks prior to the date I intend to survey their home and give them a chance to respond. Some are excited to be included in the project, meet me at the door when I arrive, give me a tour, and tell me everything I’d ever want to know and more about their property. On the other hand, quite a few have told me to “bugger off”; some are reluctant, maybe because their property needs some repair or extensive renovations have obscured their home’s history; most are indifferent. Once on the property, I photograph the home’s exterior and take notes on certain architectural features. The whole process takes 5-10 minutes, and I typically survey up to 20 homes a day. After creating a write-up on the property, I send it off to CCHA.

    The hardest part is not watching development creep in, witnessing homes falling apart, or showing up to a property and finding the house gone—it is the indifference to these situations I find troubling. In truth, my favorite part of the project is not visiting an impeccably restored home—it’s photographing a house before it gets demolished.

    I believe it is important to preserve the memory of the places that have played a part in the collective history of our county. Chatham is my home—its story is my story.

    The pandemic has temporarily paused the project, but I hope to complete Baldwin and Center townships by the end of 2021. Who knows what I will do when it’s done—our county is full of historic churches, mills, bridges, cemeteries, and tobacco barns! Who knows what you will do upon reading this—our county’s history awaits!

     


     

    Announcements

     

    Fearrington Groups and Organizations


     

    Bulls BearsFearrington Bulls & Bears

    The Fearrington Bulls & Bears Investment Club is a group of Fearrington residents who are interested in improving their investment knowledge and capabilities. We meet monthly during non-summer months and communicate regularly through an email exchange group to share information, insights, and ideas about investing.

    Guests are welcome to participate in a meeting or in our email exchange group to gauge their interest in joining the Club. The next meeting will be held by Zoom on April 9 at 9:30 am.

    For more information about the Club, meetings, or the exchange, please contact:
    Anna Shearer, President, at 703-217-0322 or ashearer1219@gmail.com.

     

     

    Fearrington Democratic ClubFearrington Dem Club Sm

    The Democratic Club’s April speaker on Zoom will be Jonathan Weiler, Ph.D., of the UNC-CH Curriculum in Global Studies. A specialist in the area of authoritarianism and political polarization, he will speak on the topic “American Politics and the Worldview Divide.” To get the Zoom link, please use the contact form on the Club website (FearringtonDems.org/contact-us). Please register as soon as possible; if your plans change, please cancel your registration using the same contact form. We look forward to “seeing” you on April 27th from 7:00-8:15 pm.

    ???

     

     

    duplicate bridgeFearrington Duplicate Bridge Club

    There are three kinds of bridge players: 1. Those who can count, and 2. Those who can’t. We, the Fearrington Duplicate Bridge, have fun as well as exercise our brain.

    As of this writing (mid-March) we are unable to provide the next time we will see each other face-to-face. The sooner the better is what we all would say.

    The FHA Board and the Health and Safety Committee have determined they will abide by Governor Cooper’s guidelines. So, the inevitable is coming, just not yet. Those on our list will receive notification when I do.

    Please text or email me if you have any questions: Jean Hjelle, 919-548-6216 or jeanshjelle@gmail.com. We welcome all levels of bridge players as our games are stratified allowing people to be compared with other bridge players with comparable skill.

     

     

    Fearrington Genealogy GroupFearrington Genealogy Group

    Tuesday, April 13, 3:00 pm, Zoom Teleconference

    Program details will be emailed to members around the 1st of April.
    Newcomers are welcome: Contact Linda Grimm at 919-533-6296 for details about participating in this event.

     

     

    Swim Croquet Club logoFearrington Swim & Croquet Club

    Spring is here, and summer will be here before we know it! It is time to renew your membership or join the Swim & Croquet Club. The pool opening will be in early May with the actual date confirmed after all is set to comply with county, state, and CDC guidelines relating to Covid-19.

    We had a very safe and pleasant season last year and expect this summer to be equally safe and enjoyable. Some good news on fees for this year; dues are not increasing!

    And, if you did not join or suspend your membership last year, you can pay the suspension fee now ($25 per adult member) and avoid the reinstatement fee of $100. For more information, visit the Swim & Croquet page under the Group Section of the FHA website www.fearringtonfha.org. If you have trouble navigating the website or have questions, send an email to: fearringtonswimcroquet@gmail.com.

     

     

    Fearrington Village SingersMatt Fry

    How to Sing in Different Styles
    Thursday, April 22, 4 pm

    If you can sing, you can sing in any style. Right? Not necessarily. Matt Fry, Director of the Fearrington Village Singers, will talk to us about how to sing in different styles. How is singing choral music different from opera or jazz or country or early music? Join us to find out.

    Join us on Zoom or find the link on fearringtonvillagesingers.org.

     

     

    WOF CMYK OvalWomen of Fearrington

    “Paws for a Cause,” a spring stroll with a friend, two-legged or four-legged, to benefit women and children in need in Chatham County: Saturday, April 17. A $25 donation gets you a time slot, goodie bag, and raffle ticket. More information and registration on our website.

    We’ll celebrate our January-March birthdays on April 8. Order lunch from The Belted Goat and enjoy outdoor dining.

    Amanda Brantley, of House in the Horseshoe, will speak April 21 at 1:30 pm, telling the stories of five brave North Carolina women in the American Revolution.

    Enjoy the "beverage of your choice" on a member’s patio April 29 at 4 pm. Nibbles supplied!

    For anyone interested in joining WoF, we are hosting two Zoom Welcome Coffees, Friday, April 2, 9:30-10:30 am, and Monday, May 3, 7-8 pm. Contact Jo Anne Rosenfeld or Barbara Fearrington for information.

    Register for any road trips or webinars at WomenOfFearrington.org.

     

     

    Continuing Education Opportunities

    Shared Learning Association of Chapel Hill

    Chapel Hill’s Shared Learning Association offers non-credit educational courses for people who love to share learning with other adults with similar interests. Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, Shared Learning will offer 16 online courses via Zoom, beginning April 26 through June. Full semester courses are moderated by our members and include fine arts, hard sciences, humanities, current events, and social and behavioral sciences.

    Spring membership will be free and students may take as many courses as they can fit into their schedule. The Spring 2021 Catalog includes a registration form with full course descriptions and schedule and is available online at: http://sharedlearning.usOr, to receive a paper copy, you may contact Mary Ann Freedman at: (919) 593-3335 or maryafreedman@gmail.com. Registration for the Shared Learning Spring Online Courses will begin the first week in April.


    fcares logo

     


     

     

    Physiatry: A Different Approach to Musculoskeletal Pain Management

    Thursday, April 8, 7:00 pm via Zoom

    Learn about Physiatry, or the medical specialty of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R), with speaker Dr. Paul Tawney, a physician working with the North Carolina Orthopedic Group in Durham. He will talk about the current directions of the field of PM&R and the interactions with other medical specialties and ancillary care providers. Dr. Tawney’s practice focuses on various treatment options for patients with back, neck, and other musculoskeletal disorders. His practice also is the site for the Duke Amputee Performance Clinic. If you are living with chronic pain and interested in relief, come learn about this approach and whether the practice deserves a try!

     

     

    Can Birding Improve Your Health?

    Thursday, April 22, 1:30 pm via Zoom

    It has been a long year, and it has been an even longer year since last spring. So, when the red, red robin comes bob, bob, bobbing along, members of the Fearrington Cares Education Committee hope that all residents of the Village will be more able to enjoy time outdoors. One sure way to enjoy the natural environment is to become more familiar with the birds of our area. We are delighted to bring you Nathan Swick, a celebrated ornithologist, to educate and engage us with our feathered friends.

    Nate Swick is the editor of The American Birding Association (ABA) blog, a frequent contributor to www.10000birds.com, and a member of the North Carolina Bird Records Committee. Nate has been a birder for more than 20 years and helps lead birding excursions for ABA events and the Carolina Bird Club. He has discussed his book, The Beginners Guide to Birding (2018), at McIntyre’s, and he is returning to Fearrington (via Zoom) for this special presentation.

     

     

    Foot Clinic Resumes

    Appointments are available for the foot clinic. If you are living with diabetes, neuropathy, or lower leg issues and would like to participate, please call the Center (919-542-6877) to learn more.

     

     

    Alcoholics Anonymous Meetings Resume

    The Alcoholics Anonymous Support Group has resumed in-person meetings in the Center. Please contact Karen Metzguer (karen@fearringtoncares.org) for information.

     

     

    Zoom Movement Classes, Support Groups, and Education Programs Links Are on Our Website www.fearringtoncares.org.

    Zoom Movement Classes, Support Groups, and Education Programs links are on our website, www.fearringtoncares.org, and require one-time registration for events through May 2021. Click on the blue Zoom button on our home page to register for classes and events. Register once for anything that is a series; after you register, save the email you receive and use the provided link for the entire series. If you would like to practice a Zoom connection and meeting, email info@fearringtoncares.org and we will set that up.

     


     

    Join Movement Classes via Zoom
    www.fearringtoncares.org

    All classes 11:30 am

    Mondays—Chair Yoga

    Wednesdays—Otago Fall-Prevention Exercises

    Thursdays—Line Dancing is back!

    Join Support Groups via Zoom
    www.fearringtoncares.org

    Caregiver's Support Group:
    Wednesday, April 7 and 21, 12:30–2:00 pm

    Parkinson's Support Group:
    Wednesday, April 14, 3:30–4:30 pm (New
    members can contact Jan Cope-Kasten
    (jcopekasten@gmail.com) or Karen Metzguer
    (karen@fearringtoncares.org) for information.)

    Living with Chronic Conditions:
    Thursday, April 1 and 15, 1:00 pm

     

     

    Pet Tips: Staying Safe with Our Pets as We Get Older

    Fearrington Cares and Chatham Animal Rescue and Education (CARE)

    We all know how much companionship and comfort our pets give to us, particularly in this time of Covid-19. But as we age, our pets can also create hazards for trips and falls. A few simple precautions will help keep both owner and pet safer and more secure.

    1. Exercise is enjoyable for both owner and pet. However, retractable leashes can be dangerous. An excited dog can turn a retractable leash into a lasso that winds around the legs of owner or bystander and topples one or both of them. A dog can take off and be in the middle of the road in the blink of an eye. And the sudden jerk when the lead runs out can injure the dog or owner. It’s best to opt for a 6-foot restraint for those expeditions outside. Remember that Fearrington Village covenants require both dogs and cats to be on a leash and under supervision unless they are confined to the owner's premises.

    2. Pets require “stuff,” and their stuff can get in the way. Be sure that larger pieces of equipment (beds, scratching posts, toy baskets, etc.) are completely removed from traffic patterns. Put food bowls in an out-of-the-way corner or even under a table. Make picking up the day’s toys an established part of your bedtime routine.

    3. Dogs and cats can both have “accidents” in the house. Turn on lights and check for slippery spots before stepping onto tile or wood floors. Our covenants also require that any droppings by a pet being walked off a resident's lot should be promptly removed by the pet owner.

    4. Pets have an uncanny ability to materialize seemingly out of nowhere, especially at feeding time. Dogs with collar tags will usually warn of their approach. A breakaway collar with a bell for your cat can serve the same purpose. Make it a point to move mindfully, particularly in the kitchen, to avoid being surprised by your pet appearing suddenly underfoot.

    5. Pets require us to do some bending and stooping, and heavy litter or food bags can strain backs and hips. Consider adjusting the weight of the supplies you purchase.

    We hope these few ounces of prevention help you and your furry friends enjoy many happy and healthy years together. CARE is a non-profit animal welfare organization that promotes responsible pet ownership by educating the community, providing targeted spay-neuter programs, and fostering homeless dogs and cats until they are placed in loving, permanent homes. Please visit us at www.chathamanimalrescue.org.

     

     

    Volunteer Appreciation

    Fearrington Cares appreciates the volunteers who make this organization shine. We see you “work magic” 365 days of the year; your patience, grace, generosity, and humor inspire others. Thank you for serving your community! Many of you are eager to return to the services you provide as volunteers; we are designing and phasing in services this month!!

     



     

    Welcome to Our New Residents!Beltie on a bench for emailweb96LP

    The following persons have been added to the Fearrington Village Directory between February 15 and March 14:

    Name Address Contact Information
    Sue CHURCH
    and
    James GRANT 
    18 West Madison (1149) Sue's Email: suechurchgrant@gmail.com
    James's Email: jimmywgrant@mac.com
    Susan M. and Dr. Thomas (Tom)
    GOLDSWORTHY 
    4421 Richmond Close  Home: sv.gypsysoul@gmail.com
    Susan's Email: susangoldsworthy@icloud.com
    Home: 330-203-8381 
    Dr. Anne-Therese and Gary P. HUNT  28 McDowell (1073)  Anne-Therese's Email: annetherese.hunt@gmail.com
    Gary's Email: gary.hunt@unc.edu
    Anne-Therese's Cell: 603-208-8222
    Gary's Cell: 435-760-7875 
    E. and R. MCNAY 4246 Henderson Place  Email: ermcnay@gmail.com
    Email: rmcnayaz@gmail.com
    Cell: 602-320-9864
    Cell: 602-819-6391 

     

    Are you a new resident? Be sure to register on our FHA community website. Doing so will give you full access to website features and allow you to be added to our resident directory. Log on to FearringtonFHA.org and on the top menu, click on Directory. Then, in the drop-down menus click first on New Resident, then List Me in the Directory.

    Are you an existing resident whose contact information has changed? Don’t forget to update your listing on the FearringtonFHA.org website. On the landing page, click on the Directory tab on the top menu and then on Update Preferences on the drop-down menu. When you update your contact information online, the updates will be included in the FHA Directory & Handbook printed in January each year. Stay in touch with your fellow residents by keeping your contact information current.

     

     

    Fearrington April Calendar96webLP

     

     

    Fearrington Village clubs and groups meet on the dates listed below. While events are typically held at The Gathering Place, it’s currently closed due to Covid-19 restrictions. If you have questions about an event, please check with the contact listed for the most up-to-date information.

    Day/Date/Time Organization Event Contact
    Friday
    April 2
    9:30-10:30 am 
    Women of Fearrington  Zoom
    Welcome Coffee 
    Jo Anne Rosenfeld
    919-533-6479 
    Thursday
    April 8
    12-2 pm
    Women of Fearrington  Birthday Luncheon  Eileen McCorry
    919-533-6821 
    Friday
    April 9
    9:30 am 
    Bulls & Bears
    Investment Club 
    Club Meeting
    via
    Zoom 
    Anna Shearer
    703-217-0322
    ashearer1219@gmail.com 
    Tuesday
    April 13
    3 pm 
    Genealogy Group  Zoom Teleconference  Linda Grimm
    919-533-6296 
    Saturday
    April 17
    9 am-12 Noon
    Rain Date: April 24 
    Women of Fearrington  Paws for a Cause  Barbara Gilbert
    919-533-6597 
    Wednesday
    April 21
    11 am
    Women of Fearrington Webinar:
    Brave Women
    of the
    American Revolution
    Tracy Bailey
    302-561-1298
    Tuesday
    April 27
    7 pm
    Fearrington Homeowners Assoc. Open Meeting
    Zoom Webinar
    Gordon Pitz
    communications@FHABoard.org
    Tuesday
    April 27
    7 pm
    Democratic Club Zoom Speaker:
    American Politics & the Worldview Divide
    Vickie Shea
    919-545-0024
    Thursday
    April 29
    4 pm
    Women of Fearrington Members’ Social Tracy Bailey
    302-561-1298
       Coming in May...    
    Monday
    May 3
    7-8 pm 
    Women of Fearrington  Zoom Welcome Coffee  Barbara Fearrington
    704-351-1432
    Tuesday
    May 25
    Women of Fearrington Lavender Oaks Farm Tour and Luncheon Mif Flaharty
    (808) 234-0008

     

    One more April activity for all of us, from resident Betty King:

    Come visit the Woodland Garden at the end of Wealdstone in Countryhouse, just off Village Way. It’s a miniature walk in the woods that offers trout lilies, spring beauties, and bloodroot. Fern fiddleheads are uncurling and jack-in-the-pulpits are emerging from their winter’s sleep. There’s even a bench to sit a spell and enjoy the tucked-away notebook filled with love stories about each little plant.

    Woodland Garden path

     

    Woodland Garden ferns

     

     
  • FHA Newsletter, February 2021

    fearrington NL logo

    HOMEOWNERS’  ASSOCIATION  NEWSLETTER
    February 2021      Volume 40      Number 2

     

     

    President's Message

    Sanity

    ‘Twas brillig, and the slithy toves did gyre and gimble in the wabe—Lewis Carroll, Alice Through the Looking-Glass. Alice reading the poem “Jabberwocky”

    Sometimes, when things in our world seem insane, I go with Alice through the looking glass to find a world where things are even sillier and less rational. It has usually improved my view of our own world. Lately, however, in a world beset with pandemic, job loss, and political characters who make the March Hare, Cheshire Cat, and Red Queen seem realistic and sane, that solution has not been so satisfying.

    As I said in my last article, we humans try to impose our will on reality with New Year’s resolutions where, according to statistics, at least half will have been broken by this time. In our small world of Fearrington Village, your FHA works in many ways to maintain or create the environment we all want to see. Is this irrational? Is this, too, a resolution doomed to be broken? Take my word for it, our board members are just as sane and rational as I am—or nearly so.

    It is my hope that the rationality of our work is evidenced by the continuous desire to work toward ends we all want. I think most of you know that we have recently completed a survey of residents to determine what your priorities are and what you want us to do. While I have resisted a few suggestions to jump in Beechmast Pond, the bulk of responses reinforce our direction to maintain or improve our grounds and landscaping, as well as upgrade The Gathering Place and mail kiosks. Those endeavors are a large part of our work and take the lion’s share of our budget.

    We plan another open meeting via Webinar on the 16th of February, where you will hear more about the survey results, as well as other matters which are important to us all. We have in the past gotten good attendance at such meetings, and we encourage all of you to join. More information is provided elsewhere in this newsletter.

    FHA is confronted by many tasks which are sometimes not recognized by all of us. For example, our Covenants Concerns Committee reviews a number of requests for building or property alteration, and they address requests for enforcing our covenants. We take great care to listen and take all aspects into consideration, and we tread carefully, respecting the people involved, and trying to avoid conflict to the extent it is possible. It is never an easy task.

    We now have a new management company for FHA and several of our service groups, Associa/HRW. As always with such large changes, there are bumps in the road. We and the team from Associa/HRW are working diligently to ensure that things work smoothly. We have a good team in our new manager and assistant manager, who work out of The Gathering Place. I know from working with them that they try sincerely to be successful in meeting the needs of all of us.

    We do our best to keep you informed about our actions, in print and via webinars, as well as by dealing with emails and phone calls. Perhaps indeed, “all mimsy are the borogroves”. To everyone, then, I wish sanity in this new year! Mayest thou avoid “the jaws that bite, the claws that catch,” and slay the Jabberwock that assails you personally in this irrational world.


     

     

    Fearrington Homeowners’
    Association Newsletter

    The Newsletter is the official publication of our Fearrington Homeowners’ Association (FHA), produced by and for residents of Fearrington Village in Pittsboro, NC. The Newsletter contains community news, reports from FHA Board members, items of interest to residents, and announcements of club and neighborhood activities.

    The Newsletter is published electronically eleven times a year (July/August is a combined issue). A PDF copy of the current issue can be found on the FHA website: fearringtonfha.org.

    Submissions

    Content deadlines are the 15th of the previous month. Send submissions to: editors@fearringtonfha.org. All persons submitting content will receive a confirmation email.

    Do you have content for an upcoming newsletter? Email us at the above address and we will send you the "Newsletter Guidelines" and "Style Sheet".

    Newsletter Staff:

    Jan Kowal Ann Melchior
    Leslie Palmer Deborah Repplier
    Jackie Walters  

    Printing and Distribution:

    Carol Kurtz Barbara Amago
    Fearrington Homeowners’ Association
    Board Members

    Fearrington Homeowners’ Association (FHA) is a volunteer, non-profit organization dedicated to the health, safety, and welfare of residents. In addition to fostering resident participation, the Board is responsible for maintenance of common property and covenant enforcement. For additional details, including job descriptions, click on the “FHA” tab on the FHA webpage (fearringtonfha.org).

    Officers  
    President: Carl Angel
    Vice President: Rose Krasnow
    Secretary: Leslee Shell
    Treasurer: Tony Daniels
    Directors  
    Communications: Gordon Pitz
    Community Affairs: Chris Jaeger
    Covenants: Eric Frank
    Grounds and Landscaping: Jesse Fearrington
    Health, Safety and Security: Warren Ort
    Infrastructure and Facilities: Mark Haslam

     


     

    From Our FHA Board

     

     

    Important okFHA Open Meeting, February 16

    The FHA tries to hold open meetings for residents every three or four months to present topics for discussion that are of village-wide concern. An open meeting will be held Tuesday, February 16 from 7:00 to 9:00 pm. We cannot hold it in person, but we will schedule a webinar that is available to everyone who wishes to attend. The webinars held last year were very successful; attendance was almost twice what it has been for in-person meetings in the past, and residents appreciated the opportunity to submit questions to Board members.

    An email invitation will be sent to homeowners early in February. The invitation will contain a link enabling you to register for the meeting. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

    If you attended the webinars last year, you will be familiar with the procedures. It will be very helpful if you download beforehand the free version of the Zoom Client for Meetings.

    The agenda contains two items:

    Results of the Community Assessment Survey

    Plans for the Future of Beechmast Pond

    Members of the Lifestyle Subcommittee of the Long-Range Planning Committee will describe the results of the assessment survey and discuss their implications for future action. The survey results are summarized in a separate article in this newsletter. A complete description of the results has been posted on the website, and links are provided in the summary.

    Maintaining Beechmast Pond is one of the larger expense items in the FHA budget. Over the last ten years we have observed that the expense continues to increase each year. In 2020, the Board commissioned a study by Kris Bass Engineering to see if there might be a more cost-effective solution. Based on the results of the study, they presented three different approaches. The October issue of the Newsletter contains an article describing the three alternatives. These solutions will be presented at the open meeting so that residents can fully understand them. The ultimate goal is for residents to decide which is preferred.

    We will be able to respond to attendees’ questions on these topics using the webinar Q & A. Attendees can type in a question to be answered by the speakers. If we are unable to answer all of the questions in the available time, answers will be prepared afterwards and posted on the FHA website.

    We hope you will take time to attend the meeting, learn more about the two topics on the agenda, ask questions, and express your opinions.

     

     

    Community Assessment Surveycommunity survey

    In 2018, the FHA Board of Directors established the Long-Range Planning Committee (LRPC). This committee meets regularly to examine future issues of the Village and determine a way forward. In early 2020, the LRPC determined the need for a community survey and asked the Lifestyle Subcommittee to conduct that effort. During the summer and into the fall of 2020, the subcommittee developed the survey instrument and launched its survey in November 2020. The survey was distributed to 1709 individual residents; 900 completed surveys were returned, a remarkable 52.7% response rate.

    Results Overview

    Results of the survey suggest that residents have a generally positive view of life in the Village. They appreciate the attractiveness of their surroundings, their neighbors, the many paths and trails, and the general safety of the Village. Residents tend to be active, with the vast majority using the walking trails at least occasionally. Villagers use and appreciate the availability of Village shops and restaurants and the Farmers Market. Health and wellness are supported by the Duke Center for Living and Fearrington Cares, both used by over 40% of the population.

    Major Concerns

    Current concerns have surfaced, some of which are presently under the sole or partial control of the developer, Fitch Creations. Wastewater issues are apparently the primary concern of most residents currently. In the longer term, three other related concerns became apparent: upkeep of the Village, the future of the Village Center, and the community after the developer completes build-out. The deteriorating infrastructure is also of concern. In the short term, repair of infrastructure and improvement of trails appear to be of primary importance. Most Villagers are willing to contribute something toward problem solution, especially based on the specific issue at hand. However, approximately one quarter of residents had no interest in contributing.

    Perceptions of FHA

    The FHA is viewed favorably by approximately two-thirds of residents, though many of its activities are not fully recognized. The major source of displeasure, for those who do not believe the FHA is meeting their needs, deals with covenant enforcement. Other areas of displeasure are perceived lack of maintenance on trails, the tree canopy, and infrastructure. A lack of adequate communication was also noted. When asked what issue should be addressed first, wastewater management was selected, infrastructure also rated highly, as did trail maintenance and road safety. Many residents are concerned about individuals walking on roadways, despite the availability of trails. When asked about the potential for a dues increase to remediate these issues, the response was positive.

    Feedback on The Gathering Place

    The Gathering Place is a facility that serves as a meeting site for most organizations in Fearrington Village. It is used by two-thirds of residents, though use is variable from “often” to “hardly at all.” For most residents, The Gathering Place was found to meet their needs, though one in five found it inadequate. The inadequacies included shortcomings in technology, lack of room size, and lack of comfortable chairs. When asked what to do about The Gathering Place, over one in five residents were unsure, while another one in five said to do nothing. An additional one in five would like the existing structure to be modernized or expanded. There appears to be little interest in building a new structure.

    Feedback on Walking Trails

    One of the most popular features in Fearrington Village is the walking trails. More than 80% of respondents use the trails regularly. The trails are viewed as a major resource. Most people find them either fine, or useable but in need of maintenance. Forty percent of respondents feel that trail maintenance should be the responsibility of the FHA. Thirty-nine percent were unsure as to who should be responsible. There was notable support for an increase in FHA dues for trail maintenance. A majority of residents would like to have additional trails, mainly to provide more options for walking. There was broad support for policies that protect wildlife. However, several residents wish to have the deer population controlled. There was even greater support for policies to protect our tree canopy, which is rapidly aging.

    Feedback on Communications

    Communications within the Village is a topic of major interest. Most residents feel that FHA communication about issues and events is adequate, but roughly 40% feel either unsure about the quality of communication or found it inadequate. The FHA was cited as the major source of information about the Village, but neighbors and the Nextdoor online service also rated highly. The vehicle most cited as a source of information was the online FHA newsletter. Many residents also rely on the Directory. The FHA website appears to be under-utilized. The website meets the needs of two-thirds of respondents. For some, it appears that topics of interest are too hard to find, and the interface is not user-friendly.

    You can find more details on the FHA website, where you can find the survey questions, a summary of responses to each question, and a more complete analysis of the results. Individual comments have been removed from the data file to preserve anonymity.

    —Lifestyle Subcommittee of the Long-Range Planning Committee

     

     

    Concerning the FHA Website

    The FHA Community Survey found that almost 20% of village residents do not use the FHA website as a source of information, and fewer than 20% use it regularly. This is unfortunate, for the website is the most effective way for us to provide up-to-date information about important topics.

    The most frequently used source for information is this newsletter. Proud as we are of the newsletter, however, it has some limitations. Anything you read here was written at least ten days ago, and it cannot be updated for another month.

    FHA website 1But, if you are reading the HTML version of the newsletter online, you are in fact using the website right now! At the top of this page you may see a blue menu bar. This provides instant access to the features of the website. (If you are using a phone or other small device, you may not see the full menu; you should see a black bar labeled MENU. Tap the bar to see the full menu.)

    On the left of the menu bar (or at the top of the menu on a phone) is a small picture featuring a Beltie. If you tap the picture it takes you to the website’s home page. (Please don’t do that yet, unless you know how to get back to the previous page—i.e., this page—in your web browser.)

    FHA website 2At the top of the home page, you will see the most recently posted important information about village activities, whether it be information about Covid-19, FHA dues, or any other important topic. I can’t tell you what you will see, because I’m writing this at least ten days before you read it. But it is probably worth knowing.

    In future issues of the newsletter, we’ll introduce you to some other features of the website that you may find useful or important. To access some of them it will be necessary to create an account with the website and log in. We’ll explain how to do that, too, though you can find out how on the website itself.

    Happy browsing.

    —Gordon Pitz (community@fhaboard.org)

     

     

    Thank you from your FHAHomeowners Dues, 2021

    The new management company, Associa-HRW, is in the process of developing a system for handling homeowner dues. The process has gone slowly, as the company adapts to its new responsibilities.

    Because of postal delays, many residents received dues statements for 2021 quite late, and some who received them have questions about how to pay the dues. One problem is that the letter sent out by the company did not indicate the amount of the dues. If you are still not sure, dues for 2021 are $179.

    You should receive a second letter from Associa spelling out the options for payment. You will be able to pay through a bank draft, or by sending a check to Fearrington Homeowners Association, c/o HRW, P.O. Box 11904, Newark, NJ 07101. Be sure to include your account number on your check. If you do not provide the account number, your payment may not be processed correctly.

    Your account number is provided on the dues statement. Or you may call 919-542-1603. The assistant manager will be happy to provide you with the number.

    Because of the delay in mailing the 2021 dues invoices, no late charges will be assessed through February 2021.

    If you have further questions, please send an email to customercare@hrw.net, or call 919-542-1603.

     

     

    Whither Wastewater Managementwastewater

    Now that the interconnected wastewater system between Fearrington Village and Briar Chapel is no longer on the table, Fitch Creations, Inc., which owns and manages Fearrington Utilities, is once again managing our plant. We believe this is a good thing because our operator, John Poteat, knows what he is doing. As R.B. Fitch said, in the years prior to 2018 when we managed our own system, we received a total of three Notices of Violation (NOV). Once Envirolink took over we received many, many more. The Board also believes that billing will be much simpler. Fitch Utilities will bill for the entire year, and the rate will remain the same as it has been for the last three years. Those who prefer to pay over the course of the year will need to call to set that up.

    You can also expect to see a lot of activity at the plant. First will be the smoke testing. You will soon be receiving a notice about this, if you have not already. Smoke testing will help determine whether extraneous flows might be entering the wastewater system, perhaps with rainwater getting into the pipes through failing joints, or holes caused by corrosion, or the invasion of tree roots. If you have plumbing upstairs in your house (toilet, shower, sink) that you haven’t used for a while, you could see smoke coming out of these pipes. Please don’t be alarmed; this is normal and not harmful in any way.

    A bush hog contractor has also been hired to clear the area over the lines going from manhole to manhole throughout the community. It is expected that this work will begin within the next six months. It is important to keep vegetation from growing above the area of the pipes so that roots don’t infiltrate the system (see above). Also, we can access the system with vehicles and equipment when needed for testing, cleaning, emergencies, etc. Clearing has been done in Fearrington on a regular basis over the years, although it has not been done for a while.

    Rose Krasnow and Fran Digiano met using Zoom with RB Fitch, Greg Fitch, and their engineer, John Phillips of Diehl and Phillips. They said they are hoping to completely rehab each of the three tanks by taking them offline one at a time. They will then sandblast the interior before recoating it. Since these are steel tanks, they believe this will extend the life for a considerable amount of time while keeping costs low. They also expect to replace corroded or failed metal pipes and wall sections within the plant itself, as needed, and to make some modifications that will enable them to remove nitrogen from the effluent. The plant currently operates under a 2011 permit that has no nitrogen reduction requirements, but they expect that will change in the future. We asked that they please look at ways to better control odor, which they thought they could do by increasing the size of the sludge holding tanks so that the sludge would not have to be removed as frequently.

    We hope to work closely with them going forward so we can keep residents informed as to what to expect and when.

     

     

    snowy roads okFearrington State Roads in 2021

    In early February I plan to compile a list of needed repairs such as potholes, cracks, and other issues on state roads in the village that could be a hazard to our residents. If you can identify such hazards, please email the problem with detailed locations to my email address, warrensailo@aol.com. I will then forward this list to the Chatham Highway Department.

    I have requested that NCDOT schedule repainting of the lines on our major village roads and add turning arrows on the intersection of Village Way and 15-501. In addition, I will request that reflectors or some other guides be installed to assist drivers making the turn from 15/501 South into Village Way at night. During the past year, the county complained that they had no extra funds for repairs or improvements. Hopefully with the new administration in Washington, more funding for such repairs will be sent to our local municipalities.

     

    A Note from the Director of Grounds and Landscaping

    Bench and volunteers


    Photo by Jesse Fearrington

    I want to thank all of the volunteers in Fearrington Village who help make my job easier. As a Board member, I took this job knowing that there would be duties and time commitments associated with the position. I am fortunate to have many in our community who help out with grounds. There are individuals who keep a lookout for any concerns and then notify me. There are the Trails Committee folks, headed up by Jim Fink, who maintain our walking paths, as well as the Green Scene volunteers headed up by Jason Welsch, who strive to keep our canopy in good health. Even our neighbors contribute by planting pollinator-friendly and native plants. As we look towards 2021 and plan for the future of our walking paths and of Beechmast Pond, I just want to thank you all for your contributions in the past and look forward to your continued support in the future.

    The picture above is of the installation of a bench to replace the one near Village Way and Windstone. The bench was donated by Carol Kurtz and installed by Jason Welsch and Jim Fink.

     

     

    Get involvedVolunteers Corner

    Welcome all volunteers!

    I hope you all have been safely getting through this January. We are making progress on getting the Hospitality Center staffed, and we hope to be open partially by the beginning of March. If you are interested in helping there, meeting and making new friends, contact me. We still have a few spots open! If you call the number in the directory under Director, Community Affairs, you will reach my secretary (my wife) and she will pass on any messages to me. ?

    We are already planning a shredding event at The Gathering Place this spring to help clear your house of documents needing to be safely disposed of. If you want some good outdoor exercise helping, contact me.

    Several great suggestions on future events have been received, and feasibility studies are ongoing. Please contact us if you have an idea that you would like to see happen. Let's work together to have an enviable social calendar as the Covid-19 crisis passes away. I look forward to hearing from you.

     

     


     

    Features

     

     

    The Light Brigade Rides Again

    Story and Photos by Gordon Pitz

    The “Light Cavalry” is the name given to the intrepid crew of volunteers who maintain our nature trails. The cavalry was summoned into action after Christmas when a large dead tree fell across the North Langdon nature trail, near the corner of Langdon and Millcroft.

    The problem was more serious than simply blocking the trail, as the tree had fallen across a fence surrounding the Habitat Restoration Project. This is an area where invasive plant species are removed and indigenous vegetation encouraged. The fence serves to keep out deer, who find the native plants a tasty meal.

    hanging the fence

    Hanging the Fence

    old fence post

    The only casualty of the engagement

    A first sally with chain saw as the primary weapon was led by Jim Fink, supported by Jason Welch and Maarten Simon-Thomas. Their attack restored access along the trail. A follow-up charge by Jim, Jason, and Maarten, accompanied by Helene Carlson, Bil Rosenfeld, and Gordon Pitz, completed the recovery project.

    The dead tree had impaled itself on a fence post. Removing the post required some heavy bombardment with hacksaw and shovel. A new post was installed, a damaged cable supporting the fence was repaired, and the fence was re-hung. As a final step, Maarten installed a motion-sensitive camera to record wildlife in the area. The native plants are once again safe from hungry deer.

    wildlife camera

    Installing a wildlife camera

    Jones Grove Cemetery

    Who knew a tree could cause such damage?

    For examples of previous recordings from the area, and for more information about the North Langdon Trail and the Habitat Restoration Project, see this website. If you are unfamiliar with the area, it is well worth a visit, as it’s yet another example of Fearrington treasures that we can all enjoy, thanks to the tireless efforts of volunteers.

     

    The “Great Conjunction” Draws Fearrington Stargazers Out on the Winter Solstice

    Jackie Walters, Features Co-editor

    A cold, crisp, clear December evening drew several dozen Fearrington residents out at sunset to witness the “Great Conjunction” of Saturn and Jupiter. With the closest degree of the two planets occurring so near to Christmas, this conjunction became popularly known as “the Christmas Star.”

    Jones Grove Cemetery

    Jupiter "pursuing" Saturn
    Photo by Gordon Pitz

    Astronomers define conjunctions as meetings of planets and other objects in the sky. Only the conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn, the two largest planets in the solar system, is referred to as a ‘great conjunction.’

    Although Jupiter “pursued” Saturn all month, the orbits finally overtook each other on December 21, the Winter Solstice. Their closest alignment appeared just a tenth of a degree apart (or as NASA explained, “[A] pinkie finger at arm’s length will easily cover both planets”), but in reality, they were 456 million miles (734 million km) apart.

    According to NASA, Saturn and Jupiter’s orbits align in the sky about every twenty years. So why was 2020’s great conjunction considered so unusual? The last time the planets passed as close together was 1623, and the most recent observable (i.e., in the night sky) alignment occurred in 1226.

    Jupiter and Its Galilean Moons Closing in on Saturn

    Jupiter and Its Galilean Moons Closing in on Saturn
    Photo by Gordon Pitz

    Henry Throop, astronomer in the Planetary Science Division at NASA, explains: “Conjunctions like this could happen on any day of the year, depending on where the planets are in their orbits. The date of the conjunction is determined by the positions of Jupiter, Saturn, and the Earth in their paths around the Sun, while the date of the solstice is determined by the tilt of Earth’s axis. The solstice is the longest night of the year, so this rare coincidence will give people a great chance to go outside and see the solar system.”

    Passing through Fearrington Village on the night of the Solstice, one would have seen sky watchers taking advantage of that great chance gathered along the fence line of the pasture near Galloway Ridge, in lawn chairs on the Village Green, or standing in streets and driveways.  With the right equipment, observers could see Jupiter’s four moons, Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto, as well as Saturn’s ring, all discovered by Galileo in 1610. Since the planets were low in the southwest sky, the only obstacle would have been trees or buildings obscuring the horizon. Cameras ranging from phones to telephoto lenses captured the moment that brought neighbors together to witness what for most of us will be a once-in-a-lifetime event. 2020’s close Jupiter-Saturn conjunction won’t be matched again until March 15, 2080!


     

    Announcements

     

    Fearrington Groups and Organizations


     

    Fearrington Dem Club SmFearrington Democratic Club

    The Democratic Club’s speaker on February 23, 7:00 pm will be Allison Riggs, Interim Executive Director of the Southern Coalition for Social Justice. Her topic will be “The Current Status and Future Prospects of Voting Rights in the South.” Ms. Riggs has litigated redistricting cases on behalf of State NAACP Conferences in Texas, Florida, Virginia, and North Carolina, and in 2019 she argued the North Carolina partisan gerrymandering case before the U.S. Supreme Court. She is an impressively knowledgeable and engaging speaker. Click here to register and get the Zoom link. (Please register as soon as possible; if your plans change, please cancel your registration so others may have a chance to join.)

     

     

    Fearrington Genealogy GroupFearrington Genealogy Group

    Tuesday, February 9, 3:00 pm, Zoom teleconference

    Program details will be emailed to members around the first of February.
    Newcomers welcome: Contact Linda Grimm at 919-533-6296 for details about participating in this event.

     

     

    Fearrington HavurahFearrington Havurah

    “Equal Justice in Chatham County” is the subject of the upcoming Zoom meeting of Fearrington Havurah on Tuesday, February 2, 2021, at 7:00 pm. Fearrington resident W. Robert (Bob) Pearson, retired Ambassador to Turkey, who currently serves as Co-Coordinator, Equal Justice Initiative Community Remembrance Coalition Chatham and Chair, Education Committee, NAACP Chatham Community (East) Branch, will be joined by Ms. Mary Nettles, President, Chatham Community NAACP Branch, Pittsboro and the Reverend Carl E. Thompson, former County Commissioner for Chatham County and Senior Pastor, Word of Life Christian Outreach Center in Silk Hope. Register in advance for this webinar: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_3Tywb4PiSHytWhn7vknetA

    After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting. For more information, contact us at fearringtonhavurah@gmail.com.

     

     

    Fearrington Republican ClubFearrington Rep Club

    TO ALL FEARRINGTON REPUBLICANS and FELLOW CONSERVATIVES:

    Please note that the Chatham County GOP will hold its REPUBLICAN PARTY CONVENTION on March 20. To be a voting participant, you must be a registered Republican no later than January 31, 2021.

    At this time, the convention will probably be virtual. This is an opportunity to participate in electing our party leaders and approving a Chatham County Republican Platform. It is an important time. Your inputs are needed. Please stay tuned for more details as we approach the date.

    We all wait for our vaccine to allow us to return to a normal program. When safe, the Fearrington Republican Club looks forward to you joining us at our monthly meetings.

     

     

    Swim Croquet Club logoFearrington Swim & Croquet Club

    Our virtual Annual Membership Meeting was held on Zoom January 31, 2021. Watch for information about our meeting in next month’s newsletter. 

    In the meantime, pick a pretty day to get out on our croquet court for some fun. Ladies Croquet continues on Thursdays at 10 am.

    Remember to save your cards. Cards are activated for the season when you rejoin.

     

     

    Fearrington Village SingersFVS logo

    Choosing Music for a Concert
    Thursday, February 25, 4 pm

    Matt Fry, choral director of the Fearrington Village Singers, presents an hour-long Zoom program on how he puts together the music for the winter and spring FVS concerts. The FVS music committee puts together a wide selection of music from which Matt chooses. In addition to what he listens for, and how he orders the program, he will share the pros and cons of having others initially pick the music, as opposed to selecting it himself. Find the link to this Zoom program on fearringtonvillagesingers.org.

     

     

    WOF CMYK OvalWomen of Fearrington

    Are you interested in joining Women of Fearrington, or have a new neighbor or other friend in Fearrington or Galloway Ridge who would be? We are hosting two Welcome Coffees on Zoom, Friday morning, Feb. 12, and Monday evening, March 1. Contact Jo Anne Rosenfeld or Barbara Fearringtonfor information.

    The deadline for contributions to our 2021 Wonderful Options Fund is fast approaching. We hope that you will be able to donate soon if you have not done so already. WoF continues to use 100% of your contributions to fund this grant program. We appreciate your donations whether large or small. Please click here for a donation form and a list of our grantees for 2020.

    Our Webinar will be “The Benefits of Movement for People with Arthritis,” presented by Dr. Leigh F. Callahan, UNC Professor of Medicine. Register here to get the link for Wednesday, February 17 at 1:30 pm.

     

     

    Chatham County Agencies

    Chatham ConnectingChatham Connecting logo

    If the coronavirus doldrums have set in and you find yourself going stir-crazy, we have just the thing to disrupt boredom and offer a world of good to your local community. Check out the easy-to-use Chatham Connecting website, which lists more than 100 nonprofits in need of both volunteers and donations of all sorts. Filter by activity or interest. For example, help kids who are challenged with virtual learning through groups like Communities in Schools, the Chatham Education Foundation, and Kidscope. Volunteer with animal welfare agencies or even work on social media. There are opportunities for youth to get involved too. And of course, monetary donations are especially welcome, given that many organizations have had to cancel fundraising events due to Covid-related concerns. Whatever your interests, you’re sure to find a good fit—and whatever you can give will be greatly appreciated.

     

     

    Chatham Literacy logoChatham Literacy’s Unique Online Spring Author’s Event Involves Goats, Beauty and Excellent Writing

    On April 20, from 11:00 am to 12:15 pm, Chatham Literacy presents Duke Professor and folklorist Tom Rankin and noted novelist Jill McCorkle to highlight their acclaimed book, Goat Light (vivid photography and stories about their Piedmont farm).

    Registration starts Feb. 15. Tickets $100/person (includes prize opportunities); available at https:\\www.chathamliteracy.org or 919-742-0578.

     

     

    United Way CampaignUnited Way

    The United Way of Chatham County concluded its annual campaign at the end of December, and we are pleased to announce that Fearrington raised $132,453 in donations, exceeding its goal of $128,000! Residential campaigns like Fearrington’s provide close to 80% of monies raised by the county’s campaign. These funds support numerous well-designed programs to help families, children and seniors improve their education, health and financial stability.

    We are proud that Fearrington residents are exceptionally generous supporters of the United Way and extend our sincerest “thank you” to the many Fearringtonians who contributed to the annual campaign and to the United Way COVID-19 Relief Fund last spring. Our appreciation is also extended to those who volunteer their time and talent to United Way and other Chatham organizations, with special gratitude to our 2020 United Way neighborhood captains.

    —Jack Zollinger, Galloway Ridge; Ruth Murphy and Ellen Shanahan, Fearrington Village

     


    fcares logo

     


     

     

    Sparking Possibilities for Your New Year Ahead

    Fridays, February 5 and 12, 1:30 pm via Zoom

    The new year promises to be filled with dips, bumps, and curves! You may find yourself feeling a bit muddled, disconnected, or even stuck, as you face the new year ahead.

    Join us for the last two sessions of this three-part Zoom series to explore, clarify, and spark possibilities on your path forward in 2021. Over the course of these one-hour sessions, you’ll have the opportunity to rekindle your personal set of strengths and apply down-to-earth tips and tools for living your best life forward. Come to one or both!

    Each individual lively session combines “lecturette” with time for guided self-reflection, fun exercises, and focused discussion. This course is taught by Vicki Field, who has designed and led a wide range of workshops in her professional life and as a resident here at Fearrington Village over the past seven years.

     

     

    Foot Health and Common Foot Conditions

    Thursday, February 11, 7:00 pm via Zoom

    Pain and uncomfortable feet aren't a natural part of growing old or something to “put up with.” A lot can be done to improve comfort, relieve pain, and maintain mobility. Most Americans will have walked 75,000 miles by the time they turn 50 (about 115,000 in a lifetime.) Many of us are walking more than ever during the pandemic. Dr. Katherine Williams, DPM, a podiatrist with the Chapel Hill office of Foot and Ankle Specialists of the Mid-Atlantic, will discuss a variety of foot problems and treatments. She will give tips to keep your aging feet healthy, including knowing how to select proper fitting footwear.

     

     

    “Hear Ye… Hear Ye”

    Thursday, February 25, 1:30 pm via Zoom

    Dr. Stephanie Sjoblad, an audiologist with the UNC Medical Center's Audiology Department, will speak on various aspects of auditory health and communication. She will discuss how best to communicate while wearing a mask, highlight resources that may be used with online communication, and cover other tips for communicating as one ages and loses hearing. There will be ample time for questions.

    Dr. Sjoblad has provided hearing care services at Carolina Meadows for almost 20 years. She understands hearing loss in a unique way, having grown up as one of three siblings with congenital hearing loss. She has worn hearing aids since the age of six and received a cochlear implant in 2009. She now has bimodal hearing (one hearing aid and one cochlear implant). Dr. Sjoblad has been a member of the faculty at UNC-Chapel Hill since 1999 and the Clinic Director for the UNC Hearing and Communication Center since 2001. Her practice incorporates the most current research in audiology/communication.

     

     

    Zoom Movement Classes, Support Groups, and Education Programs Links Are on Our Website www.fearringtoncares.org

    Occasionally Zoom program IDs and passwords will change; if you have saved a link it may eventually become inactive. Use the links on our website for a quick, current connection to all Zoom programs. If you would like to practice a Zoom connection and meeting, email info@fearringtoncares.org and we will set that up.

     


     

    Join Movement Classes via Zoom
    www.fearringtoncares.org

    All classes 11:30 am

     

    Mondays—Chair Yoga

    Wednesdays—Otago Fall-Prevention Exercises

    Join Support Groups via Zoom
    www.fearringtoncares.org

    Caregiver's Support Group:
    Wednesday, February 3 and 17, 12:30–2:00 pm

    Parkinson's Support Group:
    Wednesday, February 10, 3:30–4:30 pm. (New
    members can contact Jan Cope-Kasten
    (jcopekasten@gmail.com) or Karen Metzguer
    (karen@fearringtoncares.org) for information.)

    Living with Chronic Conditions:
    Thursday, February 4 and 18, 1:00 pm

     

     

    Like to Socialize? Become a Fearrington Cares Ambassador!

    Have you already broken some of your New Year’s resolutions? Here’s one well worth making and keeping: Resolve to help your neighbors by becoming a Fearrington Cares Ambassador; no diplomatic experience necessary.

    Launched as a pilot project in 2016, the Fearrington Cares Ambassadors Program trained a group of volunteer residents to represent Fearrington Cares. When opportunities arose, the Ambassadors explained the various services and educational, health-related, and social programs offered by Fearrington Cares or referred Villagers with questions to the staff. The need for this program is even greater now because it can help Villagers cope with the various limitations on their lives imposed by the pandemic.

    One of the many goals of the Fearrington Cares Board is to revitalize and expand the Ambassadors Program in 2021. To find out more about this program or to explore the possibility of becoming an Ambassador yourself, please contact Karen Metzguer, RN, Executive Director of Fearrington Cares, at 919-542-6877 (weekdays, 9:00 am to 1:00 pm) or at www.fearringtoncares.org.

     

     

    You Can Be an Immediate Responder

    Social psychologists have identified something called the “bystander effect.” When encountering an emergency situation, people who are alone will more likely take action than if they are in a group. This idea is still somewhat controversial, but what is not controversial is that if you identify someone who needs help, try to help them. You can be an Immediate Responder when our First Responders are minutes or longer away.

    Fearrington Cares normally offers CPR classes at this time of year to help people be First Responders. Clearly, this is not a good option this year! However, you can still prepare yourself beforehand in order to help someone while 911 assistance is on the way. This is the true meaning of FIRST Aid. The Red Cross has a web site that describes necessary steps in providing this aid https://www.redcross.org/take-a-class/first-aid/performing-first-aid/first-aid-steps. Please review the five steps outlined. Some of the links to CPR videos don’t work (a common web issue!), but there are detailed instructions linked here: https://www.redcross.org/take-a-class/cpr/performing-cpr/cpr-steps. While obviously not as good as hands-on experience, this information can provide an introduction to you and a refresher if you’ve already had a CPR course. And when life finally returns to normal, watch for Fearrington Cares CPR classes!

     

     

    Protect Yourself with Smoke and CO Detectors

    Installing and properly maintaining smoke and carbon monoxide (CO) detectors in your home can save your life. CO detectors are needed even in all-electric homes because CO can seep into the house from an attached garage or a backup generator that is used during a power outage.

    Everyone knows that the backup batteries in smoke and CO detectors need to be replaced at least annually. However, many homeowners are not aware that both types of detectors have a limited lifetime. Smoke alarms should be replaced every 10 years; even if the test button on the alarm sounds when pressed, the sensors inside may no longer be able to detect smoke. CO detectors have an even shorter lifespan: they should be replaced every five years.

    For more information on smoke detectors and CO detectors, consult the Consumer Reports buying guide: (https://www.consumerreports.org/cro/smoke-carbon-monoxide-detectors/buying-guide/index.htm).

     

     

    Covid-19 and Vaccine Information

    Fearrington Cares maintains a web site with county, state, and national information about the pandemic and the virus: fearringtoncares.org/resources/covid-19-coronavirus-current-information/. Vaccine information is changing frequently, so check the links on the website for the most current information.

    Details on the COVID-19 vaccine rollout in Chatham County are online at https://www.chathamnc.org/services/health/coronavirus/coronavirus-vaccine. To be notified when it is your turn to receive a vaccination, click on the “COVID-19 V.I.T.” tool in the center of the page. After filling out the survey, you can choose to be placed on an email list to receive these notifications.

     

     

    Open Part-Time Position at Fearrington Cares

    Are you qualified and available to join a small, dynamic, mission-driven team and to work 20 hours/week? Fearrington Cares is hiring an Administrative Coordinator responsible for a portfolio that includes bookkeeping, database management, and communication functions for Fearrington Cares. The Administrative Coordinator maintains all financial records and documentation required for grants, ensures that revenues and expenditures are properly recorded and documented in a manner consistent with adopted fiscal policies, and supports the Board Treasurer. Additionally, the Administrative Coordinator coordinates Fearrington Cares communication and helps manage the facility. Download the complete job description from https://fearringtoncares.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Fearrington-Cares-_ADMIN-COORD_final.pdf.

     

     



     

    Fearrington Directory Changes

    Welcome to Our New Residents!

    The following persons have been added to the Fearrington Village Directory between December 16 and January 15:

     

    NameAddressContact Information
    Ellen and Rex ADAMS  18 Caldwell (1167) Ellen's Email: ellenadams@gmail.com
    Home: 919-824-1183
    Barbel E. BESSEYRE
    and
    Stan I. CHEREN
     130 Shadowbrook

    Barbel's Email: barbelbesseyre@gmail.com
    Stan's Email: ranchopark@gmail.com
    Home: 919-942-9493
    Barbel's Cell: 919-259-2886
    Stan's Cell: 919-259-2665

    Susan B. DRESNICK  37 West Madison (1176) Home: suesinnet@gmail.com
    Susan's Cell: 305-607-6112
    David L. (Dave) and Dremea L. HILL 1356 Bradford Place 

    Dave's Email: dlh25130@aol.com
    Dremea's Email: dremeahill@gmail.com
    Dave's Cell: 304-784-0214
    Dremea's Cell: 304-784-7877 

    Ruth LANDA 371 Linden Close

    Home: klanda@gmail.com
    Ruth's Cell: 919-244-5558

    James P. MCALLISTER
    and
    Pam G. PATTERSON

    25 Caldwell (1185)

    James's Email: jamespam25@charter.net
    Pam's Email: p2patterson@gmail.com
    Home: 980-297-9290

    Diane C. SHUGARS 4321 Millcreek Circle

    Home: diane_shugars@unc.edu
    Home: 919-810-9395

     

    Are you a new resident? Be sure to register on our FHA community website. Doing so will give you full access to website features and allow you to be added to our resident directory. Log on to FearringtonFHA.org and on the top menu click on “Directory.” Then, in the drop-down menus click first on “New Resident” then “List Me in the Directory.”

    Are you an existing resident whose contact information has changed? Don’t forget to update your listing on the FearringtonFHA.org web site. On the landing page, click on the Directory tab on the top menu and then on Update Preferences on the drop-down menu. When you update your contact information online, the updates will be included in the FHA Directory & Handbook printed in January each year. Stay in touch with your fellow residents by keeping your contact information current.

     

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    February 2021 Calendar

    Fearrington Village clubs and groups will be meeting on these dates. Events are usually held at The Gathering Place unless stated otherwise. However, The Gathering Place is currently closed due to Covid-19 restrictions. Therefore, if you have questions, be sure to check with the person or web page listed in the “Contact” column for the most up-to-date information.

     

    Day/Date/TimeOrganizationEventContact
    Tuesday
    February 2
    7 pm 
    Havurah  Zoom Meeting  Beryl Sherman
    919-704-8018 
    Tuesday
    February 9
    3 pm 
    Genealogy Group  Zoom Teleconference  Linda Grimm
    919-533-6296 
    Friday
    February 12
    9:30 am 
    Women of Fearrington  Welcome Coffee  Barbara Fearrington
    704-351-1432 
    Wednesday
    February 17
    1:30 pm 
    Women of Fearrington  Arthritis Webinar  Tracy Bailey
    302-561-1298
    Tuesday
    February 23
    7 pm
    Fearrington Democratic Club Speaker Topic:
    Prospect of Voting Rights in the South
    Vickie Shea
    919-545-0024
    Coming in March…   
    Monday
    March 1
    7 pm
    Women of Fearrington Welcome Coffee Jo Anne Rosenfeld
    302-270-7774

     

     

     
  • FHA Newsletter, July/August 2020

    newsletter

    HOMEOWNERS’ ASSOCIATION NEWSLETTER
    July/August, 2020 Volume 39 Number 7

    LATE BREAKING NEWS

    Open Meeting/Webinar Scheduled for Thursday, July 16 at 7 pm

    The FHA board invites you to a webinar in which board members will present an overview of important issues that confront the FHA. This is in lieu of an open meeting that we would normally hold at this time of year. Three presentations are planned.  Click on a link to read an update on a specific topic.

    Before attending the meeting, you will need to download the Zoom Client for Meetings. You can do this for free, and it should work on most recent operating systems.

    More information will be sent by email to all Fearrington residents, including instructions on how to access the meeting.

     

    PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

    Old-ER

    “Old age ain’t no place for sissies” said Bette Davis. If you are old enough to have a solid memory of her, then you are old enough to know what she meant. Of course, like me, when we look into the mirror we do not say “I am old”, we say “I’m getting older.” Perhaps this is not merely avoiding reality, for as Mark Twain observed, “I am aware that I am very old now, but I am also aware that I have never been so young, in spirit.”

    While there is some diversity of ages in Fearrington Village, most of us fall into the “old-ER” group. And most of us probably have the same reaction as Twain. I often wonder what there is about our village that attracted so many accomplished, spirited, and very smart people. These are people who have often fled the hectic pace of cities for our semi-rural village, where our entry is greeted by whirligigs and cows and goats in a field.

    It seems clear that our landscaping is one attraction. Unlike many developers who take the easy path and clear cut all the trees to build, Fitch Creations has built to save the trees and create some level of privacy. But I think the big attraction is community – people who share and support each other in neighborhoods as people do in small towns. A perfect example is Fearrington Cares, an organization of volunteers who believe that when neighbors help neighbors, everyone benefits. Today, Fearrington Cares is recognized as one of the most dynamic and effective non-profit community care organizations in the nation.

    The sense of community is strengthened when I meet residents on my walks. I do not pass anyone without saying hello, and the response is always positive. Try that in many cities and it would frighten people. We all need the support our village offers.

    However, some things might surprise people in our community, which has grown to the size of many small towns. We rely on our residents to provide the backbone of services; our FHA Board, its committees and many volunteers, make things work, where in a town there would be a structure of paid employees. This takes a lot of work. Take, for example, the work being done to ensure a good waste treatment process. Many, like me, may have asked if the village had a sewage system; glad to hear “yes” we find later that it is a village system, not one provided by the County. Now we rely on a committee of volunteers to determine what this might imply for the future of the village.

    Our community differs from cities or large towns in that we who live here must take care of our properties, down to the street level for things like tree limbs that block visibility on roadways, or drainage canals that border or cross our property. We all rely on each other to observe our village covenants. In our village those are not just meaningless rules, they are guidelines that are needed to preserve the quality of life that all of us enjoy.

    To help FHA keep us an informed village takes new approaches to communications. By the time you read this we will have announced our first open meeting via webinar (see above). We did it in response to the Coronavirus, but it may offer a new path for reaching more of us than the 100 or so who typically attend the open meetings, and perhaps use it then for other presentations. Our newsletter has taken a new path for more articles and features in an electronic format and we have gotten a lot of positive feedback on that. Our website has been evolving. All this is to better inform us all and provide a way to hear from more of us. The goal is to maintain and improve the village feel that caused us to choose a home here.

    Carl Angel
    President@fhaboard.org

     

     

    NEWSLETTER-CALENDAR EDITORS

    Dinah McAllister
    Caroline Taylor
    Diane Vannais

    Email all submissions to: editors@fearringtonfha.org, in the body of the message or as an MS Word attachment. No PDF files please.

    NEWSLETTER PRINTERS

    Judith Andersson, Arleen DeLuca, Carol Kurtz, and Marji Maarschalkerweerd (chair)

    Deadline for submissions to the September issue:
    August 15

    • All submitters will receive a confirmation email. Contact the editor if you don’t receive this confirmation.
    • Submissions are limited to 150 words for village groups and 100 words for outside groups. FHA submissions are not restricted.
    • Items to be listed on the calendar page must be listed separately.
    • Articles may be edited for space and formatted at the editors’ discretion

    For more information: see website: www.fearringtonfha.org


    FHA BOARD MEMBERS

    President: Carl Angel

    Vice President: Rose Krasnow

    Secretary: Leslee Shell

    Treasurer: Tony Daniels

    Director-Communications: Gordon Pitz

    Director-Community Affairs: Margaret (Maggie) Tunstall

    Director-Covenants: Eric Frank

    Director-Grounds and Landscaping: Jesse Fearrington

    Director-Health, Safety and Security: Warren Ort

    Director-Infrastructure and Facilities: Mark Haslam

    NEWSLETTER NEWS

    Dear Readers,

    It is with full and grateful hearts that we are saying farewell as editors of your monthly FHA Newsletter, effective with this issue. The future looks as though there will be a decided emphasis on the electronic version for people to read more easily on computers, smartphones, and tablets. Because of this technical trend, formatting as you have been used to seeing in the print version will not be necessary. These upcoming changes convinced us to pass the baton to others, led by Communications Director, Gordon Pitz.

    Serving as your editors has been a privilege and a labor of love. We hope that we have provided you with accurate and pertinent information, all of which was generated by the articles you submitted for publication. It’s been a cooperative effort and we applaud your participation in making the newsletter a vital communication tool for the community. Our hope is that the newer tool will be a successful.

    Thank you for your support of us and the work we have done. We leave with many great memories of the years at this “job.” We will miss working with those of you who volunteered to be the voice for your particular club or group. Please continue to see that your news gets out to the community because it is so important.

    Again, thank you for allowing us to serve. Volunteering never felt so good and we heartily recommend it.

    Gratefully,                        
    Dinah, Diane, and Caroline

     

    FHA NEWS

      

     

    CHANGE IN NEWSLETTER EDITORS

    It is with great regret that the FHA Board must say farewell to the three editors who have guided and nurtured the newsletter for over 15 years. Dinah McAllister, Caroline Taylor, and Diane Vannais have shared the editorial duties, and steered the newsletter through a number of changes at the local and national levels. They have asked to step down once the July issue is safely completed. The board is very, very grateful for all the time and effort they have invested, and for what they have accomplished.

    Fortunately, two highly qualified residents have agreed to take over the reins. Jan Kowal has lived in Fearrington for six years. She spent most of her working years with Berkeley County Library System, where she founded and developed newsletters for them. After moving to Fearrington she has edited the newsletter for a church where she was secretary. Most recently she has helped prepare features and news for the FHA website.

    Ann Fox Melchior is a relative newcomer to the village. Beginning in high school, she has had extensive experience writing for and editing newsletters and other publications. She worked on community newsletters for two large residential communities in Maryland, as well as creating and editing material for newcomers in these communities.

    Are you interested in helping to edit the newsletter?

    The success of the newsletter has always depended on the willingness of volunteers to manage every stage of its production. The work involved in editing the newsletter is more than can be asked of two people.

    We seek a few people who are interested and willing to assist. Prior experience would be helpful but is not essential. Someone who has experience with layout, design, editing, and proofreading, and some proficiency using software such as MS Word, would be welcomed. But anyone who is interested in promoting communication between residents, the clubs, and the FHA Board, using the newsletter as the vehicle, would be of great help. We can offer training in the necessary skills.

    If you are interested in exploring this opportunity, please send an email to communications@fhaboard.org, with the subject “Newsletter Editor”.

     

    THE SLOW PACE OF RECOVERY FROM THE PANDEMIC

    A few weeks ago, when the state initiated Phase 2 of its reopening plan, it appeared there could be a gradual but steady relaxation of the restrictions that had been imposed earlier. Unfortunately, the published statistics on COVID-19 since then have been disappointing, and given our more vulnerable population we must exercise extra care. Plans for opening facilities in Fearrington have progressed slowly. Some shops in the village are open, if only for limited hours. The Belted Goat does not yet offer indoor seating, and the Roost is open but without live music.

    FHA had hoped to partially reopen the Gathering Place. However, doing that may place at risk the volunteers who have staffed the Hospitality Office at The Gathering Place. These volunteers feel it is not yet safe enough. We continue to explore ways in which a partial opening could eventually be implemented, but we cannot predict how long that will take.

    The changes in distribution of the newsletter, delivering paper copies only to those who could not access the newsletter electronically, will probably continue through the fall. Meanwhile we are discussing ways in which paper copies might eventually be made available for those who prefer them. It is still not possible to say when or if this might happen.

    The continued threat and uncertainty reemphasize the need to preserve a sense of community within the village, but perhaps in different ways. One way the FHA Board will try to do that is by holding the equivalent of open board meetings online. By the time you read this we may have held our first webinar. It is an experiment, but we hope to do this again and do it better with experience.

    All of us have to look for ways in which we can help one another. Often this involves nothing more than sensitivity to others. A friendly greeting, even at a distance while wearing a mask, is never unwelcome. And gestures to indicate that one is concerned about the health and safety of fellow residents are never amiss.

    -- Gordon Pitz, communications@fhaboard.org

     

    THE INSIDE SCOOP – MAINTAINING THE VILLAGE GROUNDS

    The FHA Board is keenly aware of the need to ensure that expenditures are in line with our fiscal responsibilities and residents’ expectations. This year the Board is addressing two key concerns in preserving our community. Probably neither of these is foremost in residents’ minds. Yet they are most important, largely because maintaining our grounds is the usually the single largest expenditure for the FHA.

    1. An outside engineering firm has been hired to evaluate the Beechmast pond area and provide alternatives for its use. Over the last four years we have spent an average of just over $14,000 a year to maintain the area. Much of the expense involves removing sediment from the pond. Are there alternatives for the land that the pond occupies? Once the evaluation is complete, the community will have an opportunity to review the options and vote on which is preferred. Of course, maintaining the status quo will be one of the alternatives.
    2. Transfers of parcels of land containing our forests and walking paths, referred to as "common properties," from Fitch Creations to a Homeowners Association (HOA) has proven to be a major undertaking. In 1999 the state passed laws regulating the transfer of "common properties" to an HOA. Since Fearrington Village was formed prior to these regulations, the Long Range Planning Committed (LRPC) requested that the board engage a lawyer to understand our obligations. The lawyer’s conclusion is that Fitch Creations will be transferring common property to either the FHA or to a Service Group. At this time, the LRPC has not presented its recommendations to the board.

    Presently Fitch Creations wants to transfer two retention ponds and the walking paths along East Camden and Millcroft. This is estimated to add approximately $9,000 in additional expenditures on an annual basis.

    Many of our residents move to Fearrington Village from towns or other municipalities. Municipalities provide many services to their residents that are not provided by the FHA. Responsibility for these services thereby falls on our residents. Recently the Board has received complaints about ditches that are not draining properly, and trees that are interfering with traffic along our roads. In responding to these complaints we found in every case that the problem lay with property that is not owned by the FHA. While the FHA and service groups have continued the practice by Fitch Creations of mowing the shoulders of our roads, the FHA is not responsible for maintaining the ditches and trees unless they are on FHA property.

       

    FHA BEGINS COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT SURVEY PROCESS

    When we purchased homes and took up residence in Fearrington Village, in effect we bought into the vision of the Village, its physical setting, its ambiance, and its lifestyle. The Fearrington Homeowners Association (FHA) is developing a Community Assessment Survey to ascertain the views of Fearrington residents about life in the Village. This survey will seek your opinions about issues affecting the unique lifestyle and infrastructure that defines our community.

    Over the next several months the FHA’s Long-Range Planning Committee (LRPC), through its Lifestyle Subcommittee, will design, conduct, and analyze a survey of all residents of the Village. This process will involve several steps and will eventually provide information about issues that residents believe are important. The process is still evolving, but will include an initial questionnaire followed by a survey using an on-line survey tool. The survey will be supported by a research professional who will assist in question development, making sure we eliminate bias, and in the analysis of results.

    In the next several weeks, random residents will be contacted, asked to participate, and sent an open-ended questionnaire to help define issues of importance. From the preliminary data, a survey instrument will be developed and distributed by email, post, or hand delivery to all Village residents in the Fall. After analysis of the data, using appropriate statistical procedures, the results will be reported to residents, by both written report and by one or more open meetings.

    This study will provide a set of guidelines for the Village within which change can occur. We hope that everyone will participate. You are Fearrington Village, and it is essential that your voice be heard. We look forward to receiving everyone’s input!

     

    FINANCIAL TIMES (JUNE 25, 2020)
    BUDGETS ARE LIKE WEATHER FORECASTS

    I sometimes make the analogy that budget reports are like weather reports – they are only accurate for the day they are given, and they are influenced by many factors beyond our control. In order to project the future, budgets are made largely on the basis of historical data, which are susceptible to any number of intervening forces.

    This is the summary balance sheet from the end of April, taken from financial reports provided by the management company (May figures are not available at newsletter deadline). If you want to see the entire updated budget (including May) it will be posted on the FHA website.

    Balance Sheet (2020-04-30)

    ASSETS:   Operating Accounts:      $211,517.39  

                     Reserves:                   $660,199.86

    TOTAL ALL ACCOUNTS:               $871,717.25 Accrued method

    YTD 2020 Operating Expense Budget: Annual: $230,252.25 (after $70,040 to Reserves)

    Operating Income:                      YTD Budget: $196,118.93           Actual: $209,683.07

    Operating Expenses:                   YTD Budget:   $81,947.72           Actual:   $80,491.16

    Minor Showers are expected. They are listed here because we are mid-way through our budget cycle and a few line items are either over or under budget, largely due to some upheaval in economic forces. COVID-19 has interrupted all our daily lives. We are staying home more, changing entertainment expenses, and experiencing shortages at the grocery store. FHA budgets are also impacted. We have lost revenue from Gathering Place rentals, copier usage and the like, but we have contracts to honor and the grass still grows. Like you, the board has had to change the way it communicates and hold meetings, so our software and technical support costs have increased. It just means that in order to balance our budget by year-end we will need to be judicious in other line-item expenditures.

    1. Short-term Revenue Short Falls: GP rentals, copier usage, fax machine
    2. Expense overage concerns: Computer technical help, Legal Fees for understanding land transfers and Wastewater options.

    Mitigated Storms are forecast, but these were anticipated, and are within our budget and reserves.

    1. Creekwood Mail Kiosk is to be rebuilt this summer. Mark Haslam, Facilities Director has posted proposed changes at the kiosk and is getting resident feedback. $29,000 are identified in Reserves plus $45,000 for letterboxes to be used at separate times. However, it is important to have a solid foundation before replacing various elements. We intend to take out a couple of trees, replace decking, expand the roofline, and replace the boxes with newer ones. We are currently getting contractor bids. During reconstruction postal service will temporarily be transferred to the Swim and Croquet Kiosk.
    2. A Community Assessment Survey ($12,000) will be conducted this year. The Long Range Planning Committee is preparing a several step process, but everyone will have an opportunity to participate in the eventual survey. We will retain an outside consultant to review the process and interpret the findings, which we will share with you. Your survey input will help guide our budgeting process for the next few years. (See separate article on FHA Assessment Survey.)
    3. An Environmental Engineer’s Study of Beechmast Pond ($7,500) is currently underway and is included in the reserve funds. Decisions about future modifications will need your input, and will have to be addressed in future budgets.

    Major Depressions are circulating. Some of these may affect us directly, or may be mitigated by outside high or low pressure systems and may resolve themselves. Final impacts are currently unknown until the issues develop further and more information becomes available.

    1. Management Company Contract – Our contract with Towne Properties is up for renewal. Requests for Proposals have been distributed to a dozen companies.
    2. Wastewater Treatment (see article published next in this newsletter)
    3. Future Land Transfers – These are part of the agreement set in the original articles. Most of these are not large, but they will require new maintenance expenditures. Although land transfers do not occur every year, several will probably come our way by year’s end. (See the article in this issue on Maintaining Village Grounds.)
    4. Beechmast Pond Results – The report from the engineer study will be available late this summer. Community input will then be needed to determine the final direction and costs. (Again, see the article on Maintaining Village Grounds.)
    5. Implementing Community Survey Findings – The findings won’t be known until year-end, but will they will establish priorities that guide future spending and investment.
    6. Covenant Reform – Assessment, Governance

    Final outcomes of these developing storms may take several years of collaboration among all of us, as individuals and organizations, to complete.  Some revision of the covenants may affect who is responsible for what and who pays any assessments. An equitable sharing of responsibility and costs is essential in preserving our bucolic Village lifestyle and amenities. Unfortunately nothing we enjoy is free.

    Additional question or comments?  Please email Tony Daniels, treasurer@fhaboard.org.

     

     

    WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT TASK FORCE

    The Wastewater Management Task Force continues to meet on a regular basis to discuss issues related to the Fearrington Wastewater Treatment Facility. The Evidentiary Hearing, which had been postponed from January to June to allow all the parties time to address the information presented at the Public Hearing, was once again postponed, this time to an unspecified date in September. Now that the FHA is officially a party to this matter, our testimony will be due thirty days prior to the September date. We continue to refine our analyses and gather additional information.

    A second meeting was held with Fitch Creations with Laura Morgan and Greg Fitch attending for Fitch, and Carl Angel, Rose Krasnow, and Fran DiGiano attending on behalf of residents. It was agreed that a small group (no more than six – given the tight space and the need for social distancing) would be allowed to tour the existing facility.

    Task Force Chair Rose Krasnow made a presentation to the Green Scene via Zoom at their regularly scheduled meeting held June 10, 2020. Rose and Fran Digiano will also be presenting new information at the next open meeting of the Board, planned for July.

    Interviews are underway to find a consulting engineer. This person will be asked to evaluate our cost analysis to determine whether it might be more cost effective to rebuild our current plant than to pump sewage to Briar Chapel. The engineer will also advise us as to the best way to minimize the footprint of the new plant if it is built onsite, whether it makes more sense to use a pre-built package plant or a longer lasting concrete plant, and what type of treatment would be most cost effective over time while still meeting the Jordan Lake standards for discharge of the effluent.

       

    VOLUNTEERS CORNER

    Our dedicated hospitality office volunteers met online in June to discuss the possible opening of the Hospitality Office. The unanimous opinion of the volunteers was that it is not yet safe. We agreed to keep our eyes on the North Carolina Covid 19 statistics to determine when it will be safe. Watch the FHA website for updates.

    Although the hospitality office is closed and the business office is on limited hours, your FHA Board and various resident committees have continued to work hard on your behalf. It’s not clear when VP Rose Krasnow sleeps but she and her committee have been working nonstop on sorting out sewage issues and the Long Range Planning Committee that she chairs have been working regularly on issues that will keep FV the great place it is to live.

    Jesse Fearrington and his committee have been working on all sorts of grounds issues and Gordon Pitz and his volunteers have done a spectacular job of enhancing the online newsletter and maintaining the front page of the website with the most current information about the Corona virus and how it is affecting village life. Gordon is looking for help with editing the newsletter. If interested contact him at communications@fhaboard.org.

    Warren Ort has been working on ways to enhance safety in various routine and emergency situations. He is looking for volunteers for his safety committee. You can reach him at healthsafetysecurity@fhaboard.org.

     

    CLUB NEWS

    WOMEN OF FEARRINGTON

    We are very happy to report that this year Women of Fearrington is able to grant $33,190 to support organizations that help women and children in need in Chatham County in significant ways. We are most grateful to our sponsors and to those who donated to our Wonderful Options Fund, attended cooking classes, and made purchases at our Holiday Bakery & Market.

    Please join or renew your membership to WoF. We have an exciting year planned! To access the membership form, go to WomenOfFearrington.org and click on Forms.

    WoF’s Reaching Chatham Children team awaits word from Chatham County schools about the support it will need in the COVID-19 environment. By summer’s end, we hope to have information about plans for keeping children, staff, and volunteers safe. If you would like to know about volunteering in local schools when more information is available, please contact Adrienne Lallo (512-619-1365) or Cathy Somer (919-533-6559).

       

    FEARRINGTON HAVURAH

    The Board and members of Fearrington Havurah extend wishes for good health and a safe and enjoyable summer to the entire community. During this time of great challenges, we are moving ahead with planning a full season of meaningful programs and events for our members and guests and we look forward to safely meeting again soon.

    Fearrington Havurah is a Jewish-sponsored social, cultural, and educational organization open to all members of the Fearrington Village and Galloway Ridge communities. We usually meet the second Tuesday of each month in the Gathering Place at 7:00 pm. For more information, contact Beryl Sherman at bisherman3@gmail.com.

    FEARRINGTON DEMOCRATIC CLUB

    The Democratic Club is continuing its summer series of Zoominars with statewide and local Democratic Candidates.  Events scheduled include Jen Mangrum (Dept. of Public Instruction), Wayne Goodwin (Insurance), and Beth Wood (State Auditor).  More candidates are being scheduled and all Zoominars are being recorded and posted on the Club’s website.  Fearrington and Galloway residents are welcome to attend live or view the recordings.  For the latest information about dates, times, registration, and recordings check the club’s website: FearringtonDems.org.

    FEARRINGTON YACHT CLUB

    Ahoy, Mates! In view of the continued uncertainties connected to the Coronavirus, all fall Yacht Club plans are still on hold for the fall. Once we see how things are developing we will plan appropriately. So far the cruise to the eastern Caribbean for February 21 of 2021 is still on. Hopefully, there will be a vaccine developed before then. Membership is open to residents of Fearrington Village and Galloway Ridge. NO YACHT REQUIRED! For event information and membership form, log onto the FYC page at https://group.fearringtonfha.org?yacht. For general membership questions, contact Treasurer Sally Muncy, at 919-619-8817. For cruise information contact Doug Ashby at 401-954-7680. For club activities, or to volunteer with events, contact Commodore Maggie Tunstall at 919-542-0031.

    CHATHAM COUNTY:  CHATHAM CONNECTING

    Many agencies listed with Chatham Connecting are struggling during the COVID-19 pandemic. CORA and other organizations that feed our Chatham County neighbors are busier and more stressed than ever. The SNACK! program - aimed at providing nutritious meals to children facing food insecurity - hopes to serve nearly 2,000 children this summer. The Chatham Solidarity Fund, a collaborative effort of 7 non-profit organizations with support from the Chatham Health Alliance is helping the most vulnerable Chatham County families through the pandemic crisis. Other organizations would appreciate volunteers and several offer opportunities to volunteer from home. Listing over 120 non-profits and agencies, Chatham Connecting (chathamconnecting.org) is a one-stop resource for finding a place where you can volunteer and donate. Your help will be appreciated.


     

    DIRECTORY CHANGES

    The following people have been added to the directory:  Welcome!

     

    CASSELL, Bob, Michelle
    492 Beechmast

    Home: cassellbob@aol.com
    Michelle's Email: wrytrsblock@mac.com

    Home: 410-570-1233
    CONNOLLY, Michael
    WHITENER, Gae
    631 Spindlewood
    Michael's Email: smuconnolly@hotmail.com
    Gae's Email: gaewhitener@hotmail.com
    Home: 919-542-0080
    Michael's Cell: 214-732-7854
    Gae's Cell: 214-724-5811
    DAHL, Eric C
    WAGNER DAHL, Margaret G
    605 Stoneview
    Eric's Email: ericdahl2012@gmail.com
    Margaret's Email: mwdahl2012@gmail.com
    Home: 919-533-6865
    Eric's Cell: 706-340-9080
    Margaret's Cell: 706-338-5023
    FIELDS, Catherine K (Cathy), James R (Jay)
    326 Sycamore Close
    Home: Jamesfields1@me.com Home: 860-733-5025
    Cathy's Cell: 860-733-5024
    FUENTES, Darlin I, Marvin J
    381 Wintercrest West
    Home: fountain9192@gmail.com
    Darlin's Email: darlin2014cruz@gmail.com
    Marvin's Email: texas.89mf88@gmail.com
    Home: 919-799-3009
    Darlin's Cell: 910-986-7015
    Marvin's Cell: 984-265-9500
    HAUSER, Martha
    26 Caldwell (1207)
    Home: Marthahauser@gmail.com Home: 770-329-9091
    ISAEVA, Natalia, Victor
    35 Benchmark
       
    LEWANDOWSKI, Daniel J (Dan)
    WHITENER, B Lynn
        560 Weathersfield
    Dan's Email: dlewandoman@gmail.com
    Lynn's Email: infopac@embarqmail.com
    Home: 919-542-3331
    Dan's Cell: 919-444-9599
    Lynn's Cell: 919-444-0765
    MASON, Jacqueline B (Jackie)
    385 Lyndfield Close
    Jackie's Email: jackiemason42@gmail.com Jackie's Cell: 919-200-2446
    MILLS, Andrea (Andy)
    226 Windlestraw
    Andy's Email: aleemills45@gmail.com  
    PIERSE, Kate
    WASSEL, Jim
    1308 Langdon Place
    Kate's Email: kpierse@hotmail.com
    Jim's Email: jimwassel@gmail.com
     
    WEEKS, Art, Donna
    522 Swim and Croquet
     Home: Dwweeks@centurylink.net Home: 910-584-3153


     

     

     

    fcares logo

     

    ZOOM Education Programs Links Are On Our Websitewww.fearringtoncares.org

     

    A Note from Karen Metzguer, RN, Nurse and Director

    The Fearrington Cares Center remains closed for two reasons: because of state guidance related to COVID-19 and to complete our building renovations.

    The heart of Fearrington Cares is our 250+ Volunteers, the majority of whom are considered at high risk if infected with coronavirus. Additionally, ~97% of our services put a Volunteer within six feet of you; this is the minimum distance recommended for physical distancing. For these reasons, Fearrington Cares “traditional” services are suspended.

    Unable to perform our services during the NC Stay at Home executive orders, on my recommendation, the staff and I have been furloughed for past two months. We will eventually reopen. However, we now have education programs, movement classes and a support group online. We are loaning equipment and picking up prescriptions and prepaid groceries.

    Please visit www.fearringtoncares.org to join/log into classes and support groups and to stay informed about State recommendations related to the pandemic.

     

    A Note from Barbara Hummel-Rossi, President, Fearrington Cares

    Great News! The addition to our Fearrington Cares building is done! All inspections have been completed and we have a certificate of occupancy for the addition. Work has begun on the remodel of the original building and we have moved furniture from there into the new addition. Updates on the project can be found on our website. Drive or walk by to look at the new addition, but please don't walk around as the ground is uneven and it is still a construction site.

    You can still contribute to our Building Campaign; you can drop off a contribution in our Fearrington Cares box at the Swim and Croquet mail kiosk; mail a contribution to Fearrington Cares, 2020 Fearrington Post, Pittsboro, NC 27312; or make a donation on our website (fearringtoncares.org/donate/).

     

    Caregiver’s Support Group Meeting

    June 10 and every other Wednesday, 12:30—2 pm  Find Zoom link at www.fearringtoncares.org.

     

    How to Stay Balanced—The Importance of Regular Exercise During Social Distancing

    Thursday, July 9, 7:00 pm

    Tiffany E. Shubert, PT, PhD is a physical therapist and a researcher with expertise in healthy aging and injury prevention. She has spent several years studying alternative ways for older adults to stay active using mobile apps, virtual reality and ZOOM. Dr. Shubert will offer suggestions for maintaining your balance with gyms closed and normal activities curtailed. Her suggestions are perfect for the hot, humid North Carolina summer and include Fearrington Cares’ own ZOOM offering “Welcome to OTAGO* with Vickie Mendes” on Wednesdays.

    *OTAGO is an in-home exercise program that has proven effective in reducing falls and related injury risk for participants by 35%.

     

    Navigating Change Through the Pandemic

    Wendesday, July 15, 1:30 pm

    Navigating the stages of any life change can bring a range of challenges—mental, emotional and physical. Join us to explore the normal dips and curves of change. Plus, learn tips to build a personal “pandemic survival kit,” filled with strategies for navigating the challenges of change we face at this moment. Vicki Field is our presenter and has worked with 300+ organizations, as a consultant, coach and Learning and Development Director. Vicki now also leads a program for new residents of Fearrington Village, “Adjust to a Move, Make New Connections.”

     

    How to Help Physicians Help You

    Thursday, July 23, 1:30 pm

    We all have heard that we should advocate for ourselves in our health care. But how do we do that effectively? Social psychology and health care research can give us guidance. In this presentation, Liz Welfel, a Village resident, will describe several of the ways in which we can help ourselves get the care we need.

    Dr. Welfel earned her doctorate in psychology from the University of Minnesota and served on the faculties of Boston College and Cleveland State University. Her research and writing spanned several areas, but her major focus was on promoting the ethical practice of psychology.

     

    A Good Night: Sleep Strategies for Older Adults In These Difficult Times

    Thursday, August 13, 7:00 pm

    Sleep patterns change as we get older, but nighttime sleep problems and daytime sleepiness (or fatigue) are not part of the normal aging process. Meg Danforth, PhD, Certified Behavioral Sleep Medicine Specialist, returns to Fearrington to provide strategies for getting a good night’s sleep, identify the common causes of sleep problems in older adults and discuss resources for treating sleep disorders. Dr. Danforth is the Director of the Duke Behavioral Sleep Medicine Clinic.

     

    Innovative Care Options for Living with Dementia

    Thursday, August 27, 1:30 pm

    The Duke Dementia Family Support Program (DDFSP) has been serving NC dementia family caregivers, persons living with dementia and professionals for over 40 years. They offer free educational programs, support groups and personalized consultation services that work to link individuals to available community resources. Their community-based services have never been limited to the Duke community or Duke patients. This presentation will cover the broad array of education and services available from this program. The co-presenters are Lisa P. Gwyther, MSW, LCSW and founder of the DDFSP, and Janeli McNeal, MSW. Lisa is an associate professor in the Duke Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Janeli has provided a range of social work services at the DDFSP.

     

    Join Movement Classes via ZOOM
    www.fearringtoncares.org
    All classes 11:30 am

    Mondays—Chair Yoga  

    Wednesdays—OTAGO exercise program

    Thursdays—Line Dancing

     

    Local Mask Resources

    1. Call Sue Merritt (in the directory) to purchase a mask for $5 and arrange contactless pickup on her porch.
    2. Nancy Cherniak will give one free mask to anyone who makes a donation to CORA through PORCH (fearrington.porchcommunities.org/donate). Make a donation and then email Nancy at nancy.cherniak@gmail.com to request a color. Nancy will leave the mask in a plastic bag identified by your name to be picked up contact-free.
    3. Call Sara Hulme (in the directory) to purchase a mask for $5 and arrange contactless pickup on her porch.

     

    Website News!

    If you are using the internet, you are likely finding lots of interesting documentaries, brain games and movement classes. The NEWS feature on our website recently posted information about a free site that addresses all three areas: seniorplanet.org/—check it out! Our site, www.fearringtoncares.org, also has information about joining a ZOOM call, virtual classes at the Chatham Library and links to join our movement classes and our education programs.

     

    Hurricane Preparedness—It’s Not Just for the Coast!

    The Atlantic hurricane season officially runs from June 1 to November 1. NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center is anticipating an above-normal 2020 season, with 13 to 19 named storms and possible major hurricanes.

    Fearrington Village is over 200 miles from the coast, but our area can still be threatened by the high winds, heavy rain, flooding and tornadoes generated by a hurricane. We all need to be ready BEFORE an emergency develops! Many valuable suggestions are available from the National Weather Service (www.weather.gov/wrn/hurricane-preparedness), the Department of Homeland Security (www.ready.gov/hurricanes) and many other government agencies.

    The Red Cross also has a number of excellent hurricane safety resources, checklists and guides (www.redcross.org/get-help/how-to-prepare-for-emergencies/types-of-emergencies/hurricane.html).

    Closer to home, the FHA Health, Safety and Security Committee blog has curated emergency preparedness resources (fhahss.blogspot.com/p/p.html). The blog also explains how to sign up for emergency email notifications from the FHA about conditions that are of immediate concern and could affect Fearrington.

    Chatham County Emergency Management’s “READY Chatham” initiative provides an extensive list of resources related to hurricane preparedness (www.chathamnc.org/government/departments-programs/emergency-operations/ready-chatham). Village residents can register for the free “ALERT Chatham”, which will notify you about imminent threats to health and safety, such as severe weather, flooding, gas leaks and police activity (www.chathamnc.org/government/departments-programs/emergency-operations/alert-chatham).



    fearrington NL logo

    Newsletter Supplement, July/August 2020

    You can click on a photo to see the caption and credits.

    The summer edition is devoted to the vegetable kingdom. It celebrates the joy of plants, wild and cultivated, and recognition of those who tend them. The animal kingdom is not forgotten though, and we have included a few delightful images of Bluebirds, a Summer Tanager, and a Red-tailed Hawk.

    Bird Life in Fearrington

    Akiba

    The photos were submitted by Betty Akiba. The red cedar bluebird house you see was made by her husband Joe Strain on his woodturning lathe from a red cedar log found in the neighborhood. The Historic District is filled with people who love trees and have a lot of them on their property. Joe and Betty have lived in Fearrington for 15 years, and Joe is a member of the Chapel Hill Woodturners Club. Joe says his birdhouse is sized with an appropriate hole for use by bluebirds and is easily accessible for cleaning.

    Red tailed hawkJoe’s new house (which he just finished and put up in the backyard) may now have a couple! The male was clearly courting a lady friend—see the picture where he was doing his display. She looked interested and poked her head into the house numerous times. He has continued to come to the yard daily to eat and hang out. She shows up occasionally and pokes her head into the house, but doesn't stay. Betty and Joe are not sure how bluebirds feel about having a cedar house that smells like a coat closet!

    Recently Betty reported seeing a Summer Tanager – the first one they’d ever seen! Has anyone else seen them?

    And here is a dramatic photo by Tony Daniels of a Red-tailed Hawk taking off from its perch, perhaps in search of its next meal.

     

    Plant Magic

    By Betty King

    plants

    As all my friends will attest, I am a plant nerd. You would be one, too, if you could only look through my eyes, for I see beauty and fascination in every growing thing. Take for instance, the rarely noticed little plant named lyre-leaf sage. Botanists call it Salvia lyrata; most people just call it a weed. What I see is lovely, dangling, light blue flowers rising above a flat plate of deeply cut basal leaves. The flower is comprised of two lips, the lower one much larger than the top and protruding – a perfect landing pad for pollinators. There’s a trick going on, however. When weight is placed on the landing pad, pollen is released from above and showers the visiting insect, which soon travels to another flower and in so doing, pollinates it. Who knew this unassuming plant had such a master plan?

    Take a closer look at our native wildflower and favorite woodland plant, the columbine.  Its flower is a hodge-podge of botanical parts and resembles the creation of some mad scientist.  Five little horns top the flaring red skirt encircling yellow petals.  Shooting out of the center, like the sparks from a child’s sparkler, are clusters of yellow stamens.  It’s a botanical mess, but this little oddity has a secret.  Those diabolical-looking horns above the flower contain the nectar, which means only certain birds with specialized parts can access it.  Even so, to us mere mortals, it is a delight to behold.

    Betty King coneFerns are everywhere, and that’s a good thing, for they are some of my favorites.  I love the variety of size and shape of their fronds, and their aura of wildness.  But look closer and there’s even more to appreciate. Every fern begins its new growth as a fiddlehead.  Resembling the neck of a violin, it slowly uncoils from a tight little knob at the center of the fern base to its mature and graceful frond.  The uncurling of the developing frond reveals a clue to its identity.  Some are covered with white, woolly hairs (the Christmas fern), some frankly resemble a grotesque, black-haired unborn thing (the autumn fern), and some just seem a bit naked (the royal fern).  Nevertheless, each is unique and profoundly wonderful.

    Fascination is everywhere in Nature.  Did you ever pick up a pine cone and look at its fat end?  The opposing spirals of scales are examples of the Fibonacci Sequence,* a mathematical pattern of growth.  You can see this natural phenomenon in many places – the center of a sunflower, seashells, even the curled form of a hurricane.


    fibonacciFor readers who have never heard of the Fibonacci Sequence, it is a sequence of numbers starting with 0, 1, in which every following number is the sum of the two preceding numbers, i.e, 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8….

    There, aren’t you glad you asked? You may have seen graphic illustrations of the sequence that form a spiral. The spiral is made up of a series of squares; the size of each square represents the increasing numbers. The astonishing thing is that because of the way living things grow, these spirals appear throughout nature: flowers, leaves, shells, pine cones, and many other examples. No wonder nerds of all kinds love the Fibonacci!

    Gordon Pitz   


    Gardens of Fearrington Village

    Article and photos by Sheila Creth
    R.B.Fitch and his late wife, Jenny, admired the smaller villages of England. They wanted to create a “coming together place” . . . enjoyed in a garden setting. [from The Story of Fearrington, https://fearrington.com/history/]

    During spring 2020, as residents of Fearrington Village adjust to the COVID-19 pandemic, many have found pleasure and distraction with walks around the gardens of the Village Center. In an area of 10 acres there are approximately 60 garden areas or beds.

    Donna MearsDonna Mears is one of four gardeners currently working at Fearrington Village who keep the many gardens with varied plants and colors looking beautiful. In October 2020 she will celebrate thirty years (30) years as a gardener with Fearrington Village. Donna began gardening here shortly after Jenny Fitch had begun installing and designing the Village Center gardens. Ginny Gregory, who had a small flower farm nearby, was hired by Jenny Fitch as the gardener for the Village. Ginny in turn hired Donna, whom she knew from when they were pre-school teachers together. For Donna it was initially a part-time position, but she quickly turned to cultivating beautiful gardens as her profession. Donna often will be seen gardening around McIntyre’s Books and the Belted Goat, though she’s also responsible for the gardens by the Barn, the Dovecote, and the center area where the Whirligig is located.

    Village center sDonna also manages the two cutting gardens that are maintained to provide flowers for the restaurant as well as for weddings. Maintaining the cutting gardens requires constant attention so that the plants do not go to seed but continue producing flowers throughout the season. By one cutting garden, a sign indicates people are free to “Browse” – presumably a gentle reminder not to cut the flowers. Donna laughed at the wording but said there has not been a problem with residents assuming the cutting garden was for them.

    During the dry months of spring and summer, Donna indicated that a major activity is keeping track of the watering schedule for the gardens that she oversees. While there are watering systems, Donna has to turn them on and off on a schedule and has lots of papers tracking the schedule. The worst, she said, is when on occasion she arrives home and worries that she might not have turned off a particular water system – she then returns to the Village to check.

     

    The GoatThere are many aspects of her job that Donna enjoys including the ability to set her own schedule based on what needs to be accomplished throughout the year. The month of January is a favorite time; it is when she designs the gardens and orders seeds for the many plants she grows in the greenhouse. She enjoys the winter months as a time for reading catalogs and other garden publications to learn about new plants and other aspects of gardening.

    She is free to design and select plants, while keeping in mind the Fearrington ‘taste.’ Her favorite plants are annuals; they provide the color in the gardens from spring through fall while perennial blooms come and go. Donna estimates that annuals are about fifty percent of the garden plants. She does enjoy exploring new plants, such as a beautiful Rice plant (a type of grass) that she grew two years ago from which they harvested some rice.

    During her time at Fearrington Village, Donna recalled some of the memorable natural events that have occurred – Hurricane Fran in 1996, the ice storm of 2002, and the state-wide severe drought of 2007. All of these events alter the landscape, she said, causing damage to trees and garden plants.

    Donna finds one of the most satisfying aspects of working at Fearrington Village is the “family feel” here. She enjoys the friendliness of staff, from people in housekeeping to the realty office and the shops, many of whom she says have been here a long time. Village staff know each other and are friendly as are the residents of the Village.

    Gardens

    Other Gardeners at Fearrington Village.

    Ridley Wendy Moses

    Wendy Moses, whose garden domain includes the gardens around the Inn, the reception and courtyard areas, and behind the Inn.

    Ryan Cadwalader is responsible for gardens in front of the Restaurant, the Park Building, and around the Roost, and he takes care of trees in the Village Center and Camden Park.

    Emily Houck is the Culinary Gardener and she takes care of the Herb Garden, and works with the restaurants to grow specialty produce served to guests.

    The Fearrington Village gardens are a gift for residents and visitors to enjoy throughout the year. When you see one of the gardeners out working, be sure to say hello and thank them for bringing beauty into our lives.

     

    Fearrington Adapts to a New World

    Plants and non-human animals may have suffered little from the pandemic that has affected humanity world-wide. Village residents, however, have been forced to adapt to new constraints. Social gatherings are largely restricted to outdoor settings; we are grateful when the weather cooperates.

    Soiree

    Rutherford Close MemorialA small memorial has been created in Rutherford Close to offer inspirational messages.

    And every sunrise offers a suggestion that one day things will improve.

     

    Sunrise at Camden Park Lake


    Where in the Village Is... ?

    Below is the third in a series of puzzles we hope will encourage you to explore the village. For each of the four photos below, can you identify the location shown in the photo? They were all taken from a spot on or near public roads, paths, or trails. This should be easier than the May puzzle, which turned out to be much more difficult than I expected. Again, the numbers in parentheses refer to the map numbers that contain the location for a photograph.

    Gordon Pitz   

    Where is...

    Left to Right:  “Walk this way …” (1)   Log hut (2)   Ventilation Shaft (5)   Lawn and landscape (5)

     

    Where was...

    Where was... 

    Here are the answers to the May puzzle, left to right: 

    146 Windstone, 628 Spindlewood, Bush Creek bench beside North Langdon Trail, Cattle pasture near corner of East Camden and Weathersfield.

     


     

    Water Feature

    Coming Next Month

    Of course, there is no newsletter next month—That's why this issue is the July/August one.  However, in September and through the Fall months we have a number of features planned.  In particular, as a follow-up to this month's feature on Fearrington Gardens, we plan one on Hidden Gardens—those little gems hidden away out of sight, sometimes on a resident's property.

    Do you know of any?  Do you have photos?  Please send what you have, with an explanation, to communications@fhaboard.org , with "Hidden Gardens" in the subject line.

     

    Supplement Editor:  Gordon Pitz, communications@fhaboard.org.

    Send photos (with caption, location, and credit) to the above address.  Please send high quality files, resized to 1000 pixels on the longest dimension.  If you are not sure how to do that, please contact us at the above address.

    With many thanks to Jack Brinn, Tony Daniels, Jim Brooking, and Helene Carlson for their help and advice, and to all those who have been kind enough to provide photos. I regret that I can use only a selection of those we receive.

     

  • FHA Newsletter, June 2020

    newsletter

    HOMEOWNERS’ ASSOCIATION NEWSLETTER
    June, 2020 Volume 39 Number 6

    PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

    Worries and Action

    As the 14th Dalai Lama observed, "If a problem is fixable, if a situation is such that you can do something about it, then there is no need to worry. If it's not fixable, then there is no help in worrying". There are many problems facing us that we can do nothing about. But there are many problems we can deal with, and acting on them can dissipate those worries. So, our FHA worries about things that sustain or improve our quality of life and our property values, and it acts on those worries. We look toward improvements in many areas.

    One might think that in our time of Coronavirus the FHA has less to do, but we are in fact busier than ever. Fortunately our FHA Board is strong and acts as a team, and we have acted to draw on the amazing talent repository that is Fearrington Village to create committees for action.

    There are other articles in the Newsletter or on our website which go into some detail on many of our action items, but the summary below highlights a few:

    • Wastewater Management – Our Vice President, Rose Krasnow, has formed a task force to watch over the system in Fearrington Village which either will require substantial upgrading or become part of a project to connect it to a facility in Briar Chapel. The latter would require pipes to be laid in some areas, and FHA has serious concerns about the plan and about the capabilities of the company (Envirolink) which would operate the system. It is up to the North Carolina Public Utilities Commission (NCPUC) to approve or disapprove of that project.  Our task force has people with considerable expertise in this area to act for all of us. It is important that the NCPUC hears our concerns; to that end we have engaged an attorney to take the necessary steps to allow us to “intervene” at hearings to be held.  Of course, that creates an additional expense, putting pressure on our already stressed budget.
    • Grounds and Roads – These make up a significant part our quality of life and property values, and our team watches over these areas. That requires a lot of work. Our walking paths and trails are an important component also, and we must consider how to manage those as we move forward.  Fitch Creations will transfer more land to FHA, which will require more expense.  Costs of servicing the paths mount each year and that, plus having new land to manage, also put pressure on our budget.  We will need to ask approval for additional budget above the 5% currently allowed.
    • Gathering Place - Our Director of Health, Safety and Security (Warren Ort) has formed a committee to determine how and when the Gathering Place can safely be opened. This team includes people with medical expertise to guide our decisions.
    • Financial Management - This year our contract with the Management Company, Towne Properties, is up for renewal. We must evaluate our requirements, as well as their performance and costs. We will request proposals, and compare Towne Properties with alternative companies.  Our Treasurer, Tony Daniels, has formed a finance committee to manage this process and make recommendations to the board.  He and his team must also manage our budget and forecast our needs for next year; this will include any proposals for an increased budget, above the normal 5%, that might be required to meet the needs of Fearrington Village.
    • Covenants – Our covenants committee is remarkably busy as requests and complaints seem only to have increased. That committee contains only three members and we continue to stress how important it is that residents approve a covenants change to increase the number of people on the committee.
    • Communications – the board holds its meetings via Zoom, and we meet face to face only outside, in small groups with social distance.  However, we need to consider how to reach all of you, since we cannot hold our usual open meetings.  Our Director of Communications (Gordon Pitz) is designing a plan for holding an online Zoom meeting so residents can see presentations and ask questions in some form.  He is working with board members and others who have expertise in such technology.

    As we move forward and take action, you will see more detail on all these topics, either on the FHA website or through occasional emails. We are acting on behalf of all of us to preserve and improve quality of life and property values. What I want to stress is that the “WE” are board members who work as teams, with incredibly talented volunteers, on various task forces or committees. It shows the strength of our community, both in terms of talent and in the willingness of people to interrupt their lives to volunteer.

     Carl Angel
    President@fhaboard.org

     

    NEWSLETTER-CALENDAR EDITORS

    Dinah McAllister
    Caroline Taylor
    Diane Vannais

    Email all submissions to: editors@fearringtonfha.org, in the body of the message or as an MS Word attachment. No PDF files please.

    EMAIL DISTRIBUTION

    Jim Brooking, Jan Kowal

    NEWSLETTER PRINTERS

    Judith Andersson, Arleen DeLuca, Carol Kurtz, and Marji Maarschalkerweerd (chair)

    Deadline for submissions to the July/August issue is
    Monday June 15

    • All submitters will receive a confirmation email. Contact the editor if you don’t receive this confirmation.
    • Submissions are limited to 150 words for village groups and 100 words for outside groups. FHA submissions are not restricted.
    • Items to be listed on the calendar page must be listed separately.
    • Articles may be edited for space and formatted at the editors’ discretion

    For more information: see website: www.fearringtonfha.org


    FHA BOARD MEMBERS

    President: Carl Angel

    Vice President: Rose Krasnow

    Secretary: Leslee Shell

    Treasurer: Tony Daniels

    Director-Communications: Gordon Pitz

    Director-Community Affairs: Margaret (Maggie) Tunstall

    Director-Covenants: Eric Frank

    Director-Grounds and Landscaping: Jesse Fearrington

    Director-Health, Safety and Security: Warren Ort

    Director-Infrastructure and Facilities: Mark Haslam

     

    FHA NEWS

      

     

    ARE YOU PREPARED?

    While trying to cope with the COVID-19 pandemic, it is easy to forget that there may be other reasons for concern about your safety. An active hurricane season is expected to begin in June. Are you prepared for it?

    Let’s find out. Do you know the answers to these questions?

    What should I do if told to evacuate?
    Can the Gathering Place serve as an emergency shelter?

    May my dog come with me to the emergency shelter?

    How long will frozen food last after a power outage?
    What should I do if my home is in danger, and I cannot get through to 9-1-1?

    It is much better to learn the answers to these questions now rather than during the emergency. Answers, and answers to other important questions, can be found in the Emergency Preparedness List, available on the Health, Safety, and Security (HSS) website, at https://fhahss.blogspot.com/p/p.html.  You can download a copy of the list that can be printed and laminated, and kept handy for an emergency.

    The list is part of a portal provided as a way for residents to locate, read, and subscribe to key HSS news and files. The home page for the portal is at https://fhahss.blogspot.com/. To see the range of topics covered, check out the tabs on the top (main) menu. You will find this to be a very valuable resource.

     

    THIS MONTH’S SUPPLEMENT

    Readers who have received the email version of the newsletter will find another supplement at the end of the main newsletter. As usual, it contains illustrated articles about features of Fearrington Village.

    This month there are two special items. Ann Fox Melchior addresses the concerns of dog owners about the care of their dogs during the pandemic. Ann taught classes at the Capital Dog Training Club of Washington DC before moving to Fearrington, and uses her expertise to address questions we might have. The article is accompanied by a collection of photos of several dogs belonging to Fearrington residents.

    The supplement also features birds of the region. Maarten Simon Thomas has created 13 scale models of birds that might be seen in or near the village. These have been mounted along the North Langdon Trail. If you are not familiar with this nature trail, it is well worth exploring. It lies across Millcroft, directly opposite The Knolls Place. Photos of the birds are available; see how many you can find. Some are easy to see; some less so. But unlike real birds, they will not fly away or try to hide as you approach.

     

    THE INSIDE SCOOP – WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT AND LONG RANGE PLANNING

     FHA vice-president Rose Krasnow heads two committees charged with the study of issues that may have a major impact on Fearrington residents. Here is a summary of what these committees are doing.

    Wastewater Treatment Task Force

    Plans to transport Fearrington Village’s wastewater to Briar Chapel for treatment have been a source of controversy for many months. At the recommendation of the task force, the FHA Board voted to file a Petition to Intervene with the North Carolina Utilities Commission, and authorized the expenditure of $5,000 as a retainer to hire attorney Dwight Allen of Raleigh to advise the FHA. The Petition was filed on May 7. Assuming that the Petition is accepted, Fearrington’s testimony for the evidentiary hearing scheduled in June must be submitted by May 15th, although it appears that these dates may be delayed until September.

    The task force has carried out extensive research to determine whether replacing our current plant with a new plant intended only for Fearrington Village would be more desirable than the proposal to connect to the Briar Chapel system. The advantages to remaining separate are (1) there would be no impacts on the buffer between Fearrington Village and the commercial area of Briar Chapel along 15-501, (2) no construction would be required on Trundle Ridge or along Creekwood, (3) we would have more control over management of the system, which is important given the many problems Briar Chapel has experienced over the last several years, and (4) our wastewater utility rates may be more reasonable.

    As the hearing date approached, the task force has learned that Chatham North has scaled back the proposed size of the expansion of the Briar Chapel plant from 1 million gallons per day to 875,000 gallons per day. They no longer plan to use PVC pipe to run our sewage to Briar Chapel, because they recognize that the PVC pipe currently installed in Briar Chapel has experienced frequent breaks. Finally, they recently revised the purchase agreement between Fitch Creations and Chatham North, in response to concerns from the Utilities Commission that some of the terms would adversely affect rates. At the same time, however, the clause that said Fearrington Village’s utility rates could not be increased by more than 60% for the first two years was removed.

    It is important to recognize that our rates have remained the same for the last three years due to an agreement struck when the management of Fearrington Utilities was first turned over to Envirolink. There is no question that our rates will rise in the future. Briar Chapel currently pays just over $42/month, and nearby communities such as Governor’s Club pay $69/month. Although a rate increase is not in front of the utilities commission at this time, the task force is looking for a solution that will keep future rate increases to a minimum.

    Long Range Planning Committee

    Three important concerns have been identified that could determine the future of the village: (1) Governance, or how the FHA operates in conjunction with Service Groups and with Fitch Creations (2) Transition as control of various areas and amenities is transferred from Fitch Creations to the FHA, and (3) Lifestyle, or how to preserve and nourish features of the village that we value. Subcommittees were recently formed to address each of these concerns, and each group has begun to define the primary objectives they wish to work toward. To this end, the LRPC will resume efforts to design a community needs assessment survey, which had been put on hold following lock-down regulations. Rather than relying on face-to-face Coffee and Conversation meetings with residents, the committee hopes to conduct sessions using online Zoom meetings.

     

    WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE?

    In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, many changes in village operations were forced upon us.  The situation changes almost daily, and we all struggle to respond appropriately.  The FHA board has been discussing how we might best deal with the crisis.  Here are just some of the issues that are under discussion.

    The Gathering Place

    In response to directives from the Governor, the Gathering Place was closed in late March, and has been closed to meetings ever since.  However, as the state begins to ease some of the restrictions imposed during the last two months, the board has started to consider a possible reopening.

    Clearly we cannot suddenly return to operations as they were prior to March.  We need to develop a plan that specifies under what conditions a partial reopening of the Gathering Place might be possible, and what restrictions must continue to be imposed.  It is essential that steps be taken to protect the health of all village residents, as well as allowing groups to use the facilities in a way that would be beneficial to everyone.

    A committee of board members and medical professionals has been established to discuss how these goals can be met, and to prepare a proposal to be presented to the full board.

    If you have comments or suggestions concerning this issue, please contact the chair of the committee, Warren Ort, at healthsafetysecurity@fhaboard.org.

    Newsletter

    For the third month in a row, newsletters have been sent by email to everyone for whom there is an email address in the FHA Directory.  A very small number of printed copies has been made available to residents who are unable to access it through email.  The reason for moving to email was that printing and distributing the newsletter carries the risk of transmitting COVID-19.  More than 100 people are involved in the process, and we were not willing to expose so many in this way.  It is likely that the risks will not soon fall to an acceptable level, so we can expect the emphasis on email delivery to continue.

    There have been no serious complaints from people who had previously received paper copies.  Certainly there has been grumbling from those who might miss the convenience of a paper copy, but everyone understands why this is happening.

    There are many benefits to receiving the email version.  The supplement featuring photographs and special features is only available that way.  Many savings are realized by cutting back on printing.  It has been a major budget expense for the board (this is your dues money being spent), a large number of volunteers have devoted hours to making sure the newsletter is delivered, and there is a savings in paper and other resources that would otherwise be depleted.

    It is not unusual for organizations to rely on email to deliver their newsletters.  We are looking at ways in which we might make the process more efficient, and improve the overall quality of the newsletter.

    Remaining Up To Date on News

     The newsletter is published only once a month, and much of the information contained in the newsletter is out of date by the time it appears in your email or on your front door step. How can you learn what happens on a more timely basis?

    The FHA website features a summary of important developments that is revised as soon as relevant events occur, or whenever new information is available. If you connect to https://www.fearringtonfha.org/, you will see this summary front and center, followed by a link that will take you to a fuller explanation. We recommend you check the website on a regular basis to find out what is happening.

     Gordon Pitz, communications@fhaboard.org

     

    OPEN BOARD MEETINGS IN A STAY-AT-HOME WORLD

    The COVID-19 pandemic has forced all of us to find new, safe ways to perform old tasks. The closing of the Gathering Place has required groups that regularly met there to find new ways of communicating. Like many others, the FHA Board of Directors has turned to online meetings as a way to conduct business.
    Now we are inspired to widen our horizons, and consider how to hold a meeting that would be open to all village residents. It appears that we can expand the number of attendees at Zoom meetings to accommodate the needs of our open meetings.

    Before stay-at-home directives were issued, an open board meeting had been planned for June. The board has decided to go ahead with the meeting using the Zoom platform. Many details remain to be settled, but here is what to expect:

    The meeting will be scheduled for one evening the week of June 22. You will receive an announcement via email that will include an invitation to the meeting. Details of how to sign up and attend will be provided. If you do not have access to a computer you will be able to connect by telephone, but a computer connection will provide a more satisfactory experience. The board is exploring the possibility of recording the meeting so it is available for later viewing by residents who are unable to attend.

    The agenda is yet to be determined. You can expect there to be three, perhaps four presenters, each person talking about issues that are important to residents at this time. The presenters will be on camera; we need to work out a system so that audience members can request a chance to speak and ask questions.

    Obviously, if a large number of audience members want to ask questions or make comments, it will be necessary to limit the permitted time, and to work out a way for as many people as possible to be involved.

    Unless you are a frequent Zoom user, the first online open meeting will be a learning experience for you, as it will be for the board in hosting a community-wide meeting. Even if you are familiar with Zoom meetings, their use for groups of a large size will be rather different. The board plans a practice session ahead of time, but we ask your indulgence if the meeting does not proceed as smoothly as we would like.

    More information will be provided later as the details are worked out.

     

    FRIENDLY REMINDERS: SURVIVAL IN A PANDEMIC

    We are all familiar with the guidelines that have been issued for staying safe during the pandemic. Surveys show there is overwhelming support for the guidelines, and most people try to comply. Unfortunately, no matter how well intentioned we might be there are situations where distractions or other obligations cause us to drop our guard.

    Using the mail kiosks is one activity that can create close contact in a confined space. Wearing masks in this case is recommended. Whenever we engage in conversations with other people, it is easy to get closer than 6 feet without realizing it. Collecting pickup orders creates similar problems. In these situations our attention is directed elsewhere. Masks can be helpful, but remaining at a safe distance is better.

    The best solution is to remind ourselves to look out for such situations. Only by practice can we learn to avoid the dangers. And if we see someone else who has fallen into one of these traps, a friendly reminder is a more effective recourse than becoming angry.

     

    GREEN SCENE

    On October 14, 2019, the Fearrington Homeowners Association sponsored a community "Information Meeting" to share the preliminary outline of a plan for the Fearrington Wastewater Treatment System to be sold to a company that manages the Wastewater Treatment Facility for our neighbor community: Briar Chapel.  The plan involved the construction of a pipeline from Fearrington to the Briar Chapel Treatment Facility.  Our current treatment facility would be "de-commissioned", and replaced with a pumping station to force our wastewater uphill, through the pipeline, to the Briar Chapel Treatment Facility.  There would also be a second, parallel pipeline, coming back to Fearrington, to bring the treated "effluent" back, to be discharged into the same stream into which our current treated wastewater is discharged. This proposal is being considered by the North Carolina Utilities Commission, whose "seal of approval" is required for the transaction to be consummated. 

    In recognition of the complexity of this matter, and its serious implications for the future well being of the Fearrington community, the FHA formed a Wastewater Management Task Force, chaired by FHA Vice President, Rose Krasnow. That Task Force has been studying this issue, and meeting with significant parties of interest, for a number of months. Elsewhere in this Newsletter you will find a status report as of mid-May.  On Wednesday, June 10, at 11:00 AM, The Green Scene will sponsor a Zoom meeting to hear an update from Rose Krasnow, as well as to share an opportunity for questions and a discussion of the matter.  All Fearrington residents on The Green Scene e-mail list will receive an invitation to participate in that Zoom meeting.  Other interested parties may contact me for the possibility of meeting access, as long as the meeting is not "over subscribed". 

     Jason Welsch, Moderator, The Fearrington Green Scene, Home Phone: 919-533-6118

     

    CLUB NEWS


     

    FEARRINGTON TENNIS ASSOCIATION

    The tennis courts are available for use by members at their own discretion during this time. Groups will resume play as restrictions ease.

     

    FEARRINGTON HAVURAH

    Fearrington Havurah members will soon receive an emailed communication with information on election of officers for 2020-2021 and tentative plans for the coming year. If you have questions, or do not use email, contact Catherine Garland at 919-533-6329 (cgar613178@aol.com) or Beryl Sherman at 919-704-8018. (Bisherman3@gmail.com). We hope you are staying well and safe!

     

    WOMEN OF FEARRINGTON

    In late April, Women of Fearrington members elected the executive committee for 2020–2021, which starts July 1. Kathleen Angel and Ellen (Mif) Flaharty will serve as co-chairs, Robin Williams as secretary, and Ellen Spin as treasurer. Many other members have volunteered to lead or serve on WoF’s committees and teams. Although things may appear quiet, the outgoing and incoming chairs and committees have been working diligently to achieve a smooth and efficient transition and to make plans for 2020–2021. Great things are in the works, so be sure to watch for news about Women of Fearrington events and activities.

    This year’s executive committee is also hard at work reviewing grant applications. Recipients of Women of Fearrington grants will be announced sometime in June. 

     

    PORCH FEARRINGTON

    In these difficult times, we have modified our usual collections from 26 porches throughout the community. Instead, we have been encouraging cash donations to CORA, and, as of this writing, we have received almost $9,000 in online donations since the start of the pandemic, in addition to checks sent directly to the pantry. Thank you for your amazing generosity! In April and May, we also did a limited food collection and received almost 700 pounds in April. CORA needs our help more than ever, as they reach out to our Chatham County neighbors who have lost jobs and income.

    We hope to return to our usual collection model soon; in the meantime, you can help by making an online donation at: https://fearrington.porchcommunities.org/donate/

     

    FEARRINGTON DEMOCRATIC CLUB

    The Democratic Club is beginning a series of Zoom-based webinars with Democratic candidates for the fall elections. Fearrington Democratic Club members receive an email with directions for registering for each session. Non-club members can contact the Club for information about registering. Website: www.FearringtonDems.org or Club co-chair: Vickie Shea (919 545 0024).

    We are delighted to announce that our first speaker will be NC Supreme Court Chief Justice Cheri Beasley, who is the first African-American woman in the Court’s 200-year history to serve as Chief Justice. On Saturday, May 30, 2:00 to 3:00 pm, (contact is Therese St. Peter, 919-638-7062) Justice Beasley will speak to our community on the topic of “The NC Supreme Court and COVID-19.”

    We are planning additional candidate Zoominars all summer, but because scheduling these webinars may not conform to this newsletter’s publication deadlines, we encourage all community members to check the mail kiosks or www.FearringtonDems.org throughout the summer for updated information.


     

    DIRECTORY CHANGES

    4/16/2020 through 5/16/f2020
    The following people have been added to the directory:

     

    BARDIN, Patricia A (Patti)

        695 Spindlewood
    Patti's Email: pattibardin56@gmail.com Patti's Cell: 336-263-7550

    DROKE DVM, Dr Laurie

        154 Turtle Run
     Laurie's Email: fvhc.doctor@gmail.com  Laurie's Cell: 919-548-8413

    DUNKIN, Rita

        B-007 B Wing

        Galloway Ridge
     Rita's Email: ritadun@aol.com  Rita's Cell: 540-598-8725

    SPOTZ, Diane S

        132 Weatherbend
     Diane's Email: dianespotz@aol.com  Diane's Cell: 717-449-0359
     

    CHANGES

     

    BETMAN, Karen

        566 Weathersfield
    Home: kbetman@aol.com

    Home: 919-533-6464

    Karen's Cell: 561-252-0940

    BROCK, Brenda, Ken

        47 Trestle Leaf

    Brenda's Email: Pamperedbrendi@att.net

    Ken's Email: Ken-tucky@att.net

    Home: 919-542-4796

    Brenda's Cell: 919-906-8555

    Ken's Cell: 919-906-8039

    BROOKING, Jim

        242 Fox Ridge

    Home: jim@jimbrooking.net

    Jim's Email: webmaster@fearringtonfha.org
    Home: 919-542-7020 

    JACOBS, Lisa, Teddy

        58 Stone Ledge
     Lisa's Email: Lisaojacobs@gmail.com  

     


    fearrington NL logo

    NEWSLETTER SUPPLEMENT, JUNE 2020

    You can click on a photo to see the caption and credits.

    It may appear that this edition of the newsletter is going to the dogs, although some of it is for the birds as well.  In fact, the edition is devoted to a celebration of life in all its forms.  It contains an article about helping our dogs in a time of crisis, and an account of their role as therapy dogs.  We also have a puzzle that will introduce you to some of the birds to be seen in the village.

    New Life in Fearrington

    Tony Kids1Although travel outside the village is limited, there is plenty happening around us to keep us informed and entertained.  Last month’s newsletter reported the birth of two kids, unusually early for goats.  Several more have joined the flock since then, eleven at last count.

      

    Several varieties of wildlife are seen regularly.  The warmer weather encourages turtles to catch the sun whenever they can, even though they pay no attention to social distance rules that affect the human species.  The Great Blue Heron is a regular visitor to Fearrington ponds,  but the Yellow Crowned Night Heron though (pictured) is much more unusual.  The village lies at the very limit of its range.

    Yellow Crowned Night Heron 1Foxes are known to inhabit the area, but this year they seem to be more noticeable than usual.  You may have read that as humans remain at home, wildlife is appearing in many areas where they have rarely been observed.  It is unlikely that this explains the frequency of foxes in Fearrington.  But an earth of youngsters (the collective noun for foxes) was found in the woods not far from the Gathering Place.  A cub has been seen sunning itself on the grass outside the building, and another sleeping outside the Swim and Croquet Club.

    foxes

    Why do these sightings give us so much joy?  The New York Times reported on a den of foxes that had appeared under the Toronto boardwalk, and observed, “They are wild and free, when the rest of us feel trapped. They are new, beautiful life, while we are transfixed with death. And they offer hope that maybe we can make it through these hard times."


    Our Closest Friends

    OldFriends

    Parenting Dogs in the Age of Corona      

    By Ann Fox Melchior

    Shelter-in-Place…social distancing…facemasks…family dog tests positive for the coronavirus. As I write this piece in early May, it seems the pandemic news gets worse by the day. Roll with the punches I remind myself. But what about our dogs? Do they understand why their world, and opportunities for fun, are shrinking by the day?

    I also wondered, “How are my dog owning friends dealing with all this?” So I sent off an email to several asking, “Tell me the good, and bad, of the Coronavirus, from your perspective as your dog’s caregiver.”

    As the responses trickled in, I was not surprised that the most prevalent “good” response was… “I’m home more….my dog likes that.” However, the other responses, good and bad, proved quite diverse.

    Let’s start with the bad aspects of pandemic living my friends mentioned:

    • “I feel rude asking people not to pet my dog.”
    • Fewer places to go with businesses closed… where we can offer our dog the exciting “Wanna go for a ride?”
    • “I eat more meals at home…my dog gets more handouts…I now have to watch her weight.”
    • “No puppy socialization classes are being offered.”
    • “I am stressed and my dog senses it.”
    • “Our local vet has cut back on hours and I worry how far will I have to drive in an emergency.”
    • “It’s harder for dogs to socialize on leash when their humans have to stand 6 feet apart.”
    • “I mourn the loss of admiring petters for our young Golden Retriever as we sit outside our favorite bakery.”
    • “With school out…my dog can no longer volunteer as the Paws to Read dog at our local elementary school.”

    And the good aspects of pandemic living? A variety:

    • “There seems to be fewer people in the parks, so it’s easier to practice our skills,” noted my friend who seeks out novel locations to train for Nosework competitions. Public parks, she explained, are normally impractical due to proximity of others.
    • “My new puppy is learning the home routines nicely with us being home so much.” (Actually, several friends mentioned a more predictable “routine” with being home more as a good thing for their canines.)
    • “Time for longer walks and better health…and my dog has lost weight.”
    • “Extra time to discover new trails and new smells.”
    • “More time with my husband who is now working at home.” (From a friend whose new puppy had bonded more strongly with her.)
    • “More time to watch funny dog videos on YouTube.”
    • “More time to practice taking pictures of my dog and learn how to operate my old 35 mm digital camera.”
    • “I’m realizing how calming having a dog is when you feel anxious…and you have a constant companion to help fill lonely hours.”

    My friend from Asheville wrote:

    “Probably the biggest impact on our dogs is that because of social distancing, they are not getting their daily allotment of treats from the gatehouse attendants at the Arboretum. The first time this happened, the reaction was a whiplash, and disbelief. Gradually, their whines for the expectant treats have declined, but we still feel a big sense of disappointment from them!”

    Clancy AndyCan’t you just picture those two dogs thinking, “Whoa….wait…..go back!!” as she quickly pulled through the gatehouse? Like our friends, as my husband and I abide by the stay-at-home rules, we enjoy having more time to engage with “Clancy,” our yearling Welsh Springer. More time to train, take walks, and to host back-yard play with a few neighborhood dogs, including “Andy,” a 12 lb. Norwich Terrier. We get a sorely needed dose of laughter as we watch Clancy and Andy chase, tackle, and swap spit with abandon. Despite Andy being a mere third of Clancy’s size, he is a dogged little player, true to his terrier DNA

    My “bad?” of Coronavirus? Clancy’s home-alone training has taken a hit. Welsh Springers are a clingy breed, the type that leans against your leg and puts a paw on your foot. They can suffer from separation anxiety if not handled carefully. So, from the day we brought Clancy home, we have slowly increased his home-alone time, finally reaching our goal of 3-4 hours. We always scheduled our absences after providing Clancy ample exercise. And we left him with creatively stuffed Kongs (peanut butter, banana, carrots, apple) to ease him into a restful sleep. It was working nicely.

    ClancyBut shelter in place ended our non-dog outings….no restaurants, no movies, no adult classes…no place to go. A few weeks ago, I told my husband “We gotta go somewhere. Alone.” So, now we occasionally leave home, sans Clancy, whether we need to or not. Before we depart, I place several food-stuffed toys in his safe-space (our laundry room), just inside the closed baby gate. And I shut Clancy out. Yes, out. I want him to be so focused on his Kongs that he doesn’t have time to become upset about our impending departure. Instead, he’s focused on what awaits him on the other side of the baby gate. And he gives me the “when are you leaving????” look that tells me he’s ready and willing to “Kennel Up!”

    So what else can we dog parents do to make pandemic living easier for our dogs?

    Dogs are happier, calmer, and experience less stress when kept on predictable daily routines. Equally as important? Adequate exercise and enrichment. When I taught dog training classes I told my students that each day their dogs would arise with a tank full of fuel. The owner’s job, I said, was to judiciously deplete that tank throughout the day so the dog had little opportunity, or need, to get into mischief. This, I explained, was good management and just like raising kids…management is everything.

    For our uber-friendly Clancy, social distancing has been hard. He craves engaging with the dogs and people on our neighborhood walks. For many dogs, however, social distancing is probably just what they wanted all along. All our dogs, however, benefit from activities that challenge their brains and offer an outlet for breed-specific urges. And there are so many options. A tennis ball is all you need for a retrieving fanatic. Most dogs enjoy scent games played indoors or out (find the hidden treat, go find Daddy!). Try blowing bubbles…some dogs, especially bird dogs, love it. How about a plastic baby pool from Walmart to cool a water-loving dog? Or a snuffle-mat to hide a portion of your dog’s dinner kibble?

    Better yet? What about a daily walk where your dog dictates the pace? Let your dog sniff freely…where he wants, and for as long as he wants. You? You are at the other end of the leash just to keep him safe.

    For more ideas to keep your dog active and amused during a pandemic, or any day actually, Google “games for dogs.” The internet is loaded with inspiration. “Companion Animal Psychology,” a blog by dog trainer Zazie Todd, PhD, offers many ideas for enriching your dog’s life. Consider reading a book on dog play (Pat Miller’s “Play with Your Dog” a good choice). Or, even better, check out The Resource Center on The Association of Professional Dog Trainers web page (APDT.com). It offers a pick-of-the-litter list of training books for pet-dog owners selected by APDT’s members. You’ll find lots of ideas for enrichment and training there.

    Speaking of training? Have you taught your furry friend to Sit…on verbal cue…reliably? Is now a good time to refresh, or teach, the basics? Thanks to the pandemic we have some extra time on our hands. Take advantage of it.

    Ann Fox Melchior, her husband Art Gonzales, and Clancy recently moved to Fearrington Village. A retired investigator, Ann taught classes at the Capital Dog Training Club of Washington, DC for many years.

    chasing

    The Dogs of Fearrington

    Here is a collage of just some of the dogs you may encounter in Camden park or on the walking paths.

    Dog Collection

    Top row, left to right:  Dogs that know how to make themselves comfortable in a human environment, making the best of “shelter in place” requirements:  Martha Gray Stewart’s Winton, Helene Carlson’s Sugar, and Janet Keefer’s Brinkley; Warren Ort’s Fanny, a retired English Cocker Spaniel show dog, wears her most irresistible expression.

    Bottom row, left to right:  Debbie Liebtag with Lizzy and Cooper, English Springer Spaniels; Linda Smith’s German Shepherd Rudi, bred to be a companion for the deaf, who loves people; Melissa Crane’s Shi Tzu and furry friend Gabriel; Frank Huisking’s Llaso-Apso/Poodle mix Austen, perhaps intimidated by McIntyre’s bunny.


    Therapy Dogs

    C Ridley Luna at RMHOne of the more striking dogs you may encounter around the village is Luna, a Blue-Merle Collie belonging to Chris Ridley.  Collies are herding dogs, but generations removed from pasture duty.  Luna is also a licensed therapy dog trained to work with those in need in hospitals or assisted living complexes, and institutions that serve challenged individuals.

    Chris adopted Luna when she was a year and a half old.  Because of her calm disposition and friendliness, a friend suggested she might make a good therapy dog.  Chris took her to a six month training course, and worked with her diligently to ensure her success.  Luna passed an hour-long test by an AKC professional the first time out.

    No breed of dog is uniquely suitable as a therapy dog.  In this way they differ from service dogs or field dogs, which have an innate sensibility to perform specific tasks – eyes for the blind, alarm to danger, the nose for illicit drugs.  For therapy dogs it is the temperament and eagerness to learn that matter.  For any well trained dog, learning the necessary skills is fun.  Performing the task and receiving praise from the person they are serving is sufficient reward. 

    Therapy dogs work in many settings:  In hospitals, assisted living facilities, anywhere individuals might be needful in some way, and where discipline and adherence to regulation are required.  Luna has served those staying at the Ronald McDonald House and Residential Services Inc in Chapel Hill – see the collage below.  Unfortunately, the pandemic crisis has made such service impossible in recent months.  Chris and Luna look forward to seeing their friend again as soon as things can return to normal.

    If you have any questions about therapy dogs, feel free to contact Chris at cridley42@icloud.com.

    collage


    Where in the Village Are... ?

    This month, a puzzle that offers something a little different.  Recently Maarten Simon-Thomas, a village resident who is a fine woodworker, carved a series of 13 models.  Each is a copy of a bird that might be seen in the village or nearby.

    Maarten and his wife Betty placed the models in the woods along the North Langdon Nature Trail, and they invite you look for them.  The trailhead is on Millcroft, across the road from The Knolls.  Look for a sign to “Natural Habit Restoration”.

    Some birds are fairly easy to spot, others are quite difficult.  Of course, like the real birds, please leave them alone, and do not disturb them.  But unlike real birds they will not deliberately try to hide or fly away as you approach. 

    To give you a sense of what to look for, close-ups of the 13 birds are provided below.  If you need more help, photographs of the birds showing a wider view of their location are posted on the FHA website, at

    https://www.fearringtonfha.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=6471.

    Birds of the North Langdon Nature Trail

    Birds of the NLT

     

    Top row, left to right:  Great Horned Owl, Kingfisher, Robin, Indigo Bunting

    Middle row, left to right:  Eastern Towhee, Baltimore Oriole, Tufted Titmouse, Prothonotary Warbler

    Bottom row, left to right:  Cardinal, Blue Jay, Red Cockaded Woodpecker, Piedmont Barn Owl

    Inset:  Black Throated Warbler.

     

    The answers to last month’s “Where in the village” puzzle will be provided next month, in case you would still like to attempt solving the puzzle.  It turned out to be quite difficult.  The winning Fearrington Savant was Rita Bergevin, who spent at least 13 hours in search of the four locations.  Second place went to Maarten Simon-Thomas, third place to Barbara Harris.  Congratulations to all who knew any of the answers.


    Coming Next Month

    The July issue of the Newsletter Supplement will contain an article about local vegetation, written by a true plant lover.  There will also be an article about the gardens of Fearrington and the gardeners who take care of them.  And who knows what other surprises?  As always, attractive photos are very welcome.

     

    Supplement Editor:  Gordon Pitz, communications@fhaboard.org.

    Send photos (with caption, location, and credit) to the above address.  Please send high quality files, resized to 1000 pixels on the longest dimension.  If you are not sure how to do that, please contact us at the above address.

    With many thanks to Jack Brinn, Tony Daniels, and Jim Brooking for their help and advice, and to all those who have been kind enough to provide photos.

  • FHA Newsletter, June 2021

    FEARRINGTON  HOMEOWNERS  ASSOCIATION  NEWSLETTER
    June 2021        Volume 40        Number 6

     

    President's Message

    Carl Albert

    Magic in the Village

    A village means that you are not alone, knowing that in the people, the trees, the earth there is something that belongs to you, waiting for you when you are not there.

    —from The Moon and the Bonfire, by Cesare Pavese

    I grew up in a small town in Ohio, and I remember it fondly. There was a kind of magic to life there. People formed close relationships in neighborhoods and came together to help each other through problems. When relatives grew old and were alone, they often came to live with other family members. My great-grandmother came to live with us as I was growing up, and she lived to be almost 100. It added to my experience in a wonderful way. In our town it was not considered “magic,” simply normal. Yet looking back, it was indeed magic.

    For many of us, that magic disappeared as we moved into an era where children moved away to cities for their careers. City life is very different. It was later in life for most of us when we chose to move to Fearrington Village, for many different reasons, but I believe we all wanted to capture some of that feeling we had lost.

    Because I am often out walking my dog, and because of the role I have played in the FHA, I meet a lot of people and hear many stories. For example, I recently was discussing dog walking and was told how neighbors had pitched in to walk and care for the much-loved dog of a seriously ill resident. We all know how neighbors here help each other when health or other issues arise. What affects my old heart even more are the stories of people who act as caregivers for their spouse or another family member—even though they may have physical limitations of their own.

    Before moving here, I served as volunteer executive director of a home health agency, providing home health aides and other services to over 700 low-income elderly or disabled people. I learned a lot about the struggles people face for themselves and the stresses on caregivers. So, all the care our residents give to each other, or the support they provide to caregivers, is incredibly special.

    In our village, I work with a wonderful group of people on our FHA Board. They are all quite different in backgrounds and come from different areas of the country. Each has his or her own views on any subject. Sometimes we argue, but in the end, we come together in the best aspects of a team. Each spends considerable time and effort on FHA business, yet no-one has anything to gain from this other than the satisfaction of working for the benefit of everyone in the village.

    Even the worst curmudgeon must admit that this is surely a form of magic in our village.

    We are looking for more residents to join that team to fill out our FHA board as we head into 2022. Please, if you are interested, and if you too would enjoy the satisfaction of working as a member of a team, send a note to our Vice President, Rose Krasnow (vp@fhaboard.org). Rose will, I hope, be our president starting next November. That alone reassures me about how well the FHA will care for our village.

    Home is the place where, when you have to go there, they have to take you in.

    —from The Death of the Hired Man, by Robert Frost


     


     

     

    From Our FHA Board

     

     

    wastewaterWastewater Treatment Update

    Plans are moving ahead to upgrade the Fearrington Village Wastewater Treatment Plant. Fitch Utilities’ engineer is currently finishing the final in-house review of the plans. They will then need to get cost estimates from vendors and contractors, apply to the state (Division of Water Resources) for review and approval, and get a sediment and erosion control approval from the county. Since no work can begin until they have the necessary approvals, everything is dependent upon the timing of the review agencies, so we can’t yet tell you when the work will start.

    The new treatment plant train will have aerated sludge storage tanks just as the existing one does, but the volume of the storage tanks will be substantially larger than was provided in the original tanks. The project also provides a better means for transferring waste sludge to the larger storage tanks. This is beneficial when the sludge hauler’s disposal sites are too wet, due to lots of wet weather, to allow sludge applications. The hauler has to leave the sludge on-site in this case.

    Even though a new holding tank is being added on the existing site, the overall capacity of the plant will remain the same. Given the age of our existing tanks, Fitch Utilities plans to take each tank offline, one at a time, so they can completely scour it, make any necessary repairs, and recoat it. This work can only be done if the new tank is added, so that there will always be enough capacity to handle the current volume of wastewater. The changes being made should also improve the quality of the effluent being discharged into Bush Creek.

     

     

    Hurricane Season Starts Early This Year. Are You Prepared?

    Hurricane Fran, which struck the Triangle area in 1996.

    The National Hurricane Center (NHC) has moved the official start of the hurricane season from June 1st to May 15th. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climate Prediction Center forecasts an above-average season, with 14 named storms and 7 reaching hurricane strength. Three or four are predicted to become category 3, 4, or 5 storms

    NOAA map showing the tracks of all known hurricanes between 1851 and 2013 that came within 65 nautical miles of Virginia Beach.

    Chatham County is 170 miles from the coast. Nevertheless, Fearrington and the remainder of the county have been directly impacted by past storms, and, in the near future, are likely to be affected again. The NOAA map illustrates how many hurricanes have passed near us during the last 160 years.

    Fearrington Homeowners’ Association
    Board Members

    Our Fearrington Homeowners’ Association (FHA) is a volunteer, non-profit organization dedicated to the health, safety, and welfare of residents. In addition to fostering resident participation, the Board is responsible for maintenance of common property and covenant enforcement. For additional details, including job descriptions, visit the FHA tab on our webpage (fearringtonfha.org).

    Officers:  
    President: Carl Angel
    Vice President: Rose Krasnow
    Secretary: Leonard Kreisman
    Treasurer: Tony Daniels
    Directors:  
    Communications: Gordon Pitz
    Community Affairs: Pam Bailey
    Covenants: Eric Frank
    Grounds and Landscaping: Jesse Fearrington
    Health, Safety and Security: Warren Ort
    Infrastructure and Facilities: Mark Haslam
    The Belted Gazette

    Newsletter Staff:

    Jan Kowal Production Editor
    Ann Melchior Manager
    Deborah Repplier  Feature & Copyeditor; Proofreader
    Jackie Walters Feature & Copyeditor; Proofreader
    Leslie Palmer Graphic Designer & Photo Editor
    Gordon Pitz Tech Advisor; FHA Advisor

    Printing and Distribution:

    Carol Kurtz Barbara Amago

    This Month's Contributors:

    Corrie Biggers Ed Lallo
    Pat Biggers  Warren Ort 
    Josie Dickson  Doug Rhodes 
    Betty King Bill Sharpe
    Rose Krasnow Jackie Walters

    Submissions:

    Content deadlines are the 15th of the previous month. All persons submitting content will receive a confirmation email.

    Email submissions to: editors@fearringtonfha.org.

    Do you have content for an upcoming newsletter? Email us at the above address and we will send you the Newsletter Guidelines.

    The Belted Gazetteis produced by the Fearrington Homeowners Association (FHA), by and for the residents of Fearrington Village in Pittsboro, NC.

    The Belted Gazette contains community news, reports from the FHA Board members, items of interest to residents, and announcements of club and neighborhood activities.

    The Belted Gazette is published electronically eleven times a year (July/August is a combined issue). A link to the current issue is emailed to all residents who have an email address in the FHA Directory. A pdf copy of the current issue and back issues can be found on the FHA website (fearringtonfha.org).

    Being Prepared

    Loss of power for several days, structural damage caused by wind and falling trees, and even flooding, are all possibilities with a strong storm. NOW is the time to start thinking about what you would do without electricity for days and with your home damaged by falling trees. In the past, the NHC has given the county a seven-day window to prepare for the possibility of an approaching storm. You may believe this gives you time to prepare, but NOW is the best time to develop a hurricane plan of action.

    The Health, Safety and Security Committee’s Emergency Preparation web site goes into detail on how to prepare in advance for a coming storm. You and your family should review this information. You can access a convenient two-page PDF file on the FHA website.

    Here are some additional points to keep in mind when preparing:

    1. Charge all electronic devices̶—cell phones, laptops, iPads, etc. Remember to have chargers with you if you leave.
    2. Keep a full tank of gas in your car. Do not park under or near trees that could fall on the car.
    3. Have enough cash on hand. Cash machines will not work if there is no power.
    4. In the event that you must evacuate your home, the county will activate a facility as a refuge to allow impacted residents to get out of harm’s way until they can make other arrangements. However, Covid-19, lack of privacy, and limited bathrooms and showers make a shelter an unattractive place to spend much time. It is better to stay with out-of-town friends or relatives if you can.
    5. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) recommends a two 2-week supply of water, or one gallon a day for each person. If there is an interruption of water service, it’s not a bad idea to fill up a bathtub with water to use in order to flush toilets.
    6. Keep credit cards, insurance documents, current phone numbers, and passcodes ready to go with you.

    You can call the Chatham Emergency operations center at 919-545-8181 with any questions during a weather event.

    Illustrations taken from the Chatham Emergency Response Team website.

      

     

    Robocalls: What You Should Know About ThemPhone ok

    If you answer the phone and hear a recorded message instead of a live person, it’s a robocall. If you’re getting a lot of robocalls trying to sell you something, odds are the calls are illegal. Many are also probably scams.

    Yes, a robocall trying to sell you something is illegal unless the company has your written permission to call you. Current Federal Trade Commission (FTC) rules allow some exceptions. Examples of calls allowed without permission are political calls, calls that are purely informational (e.g., weather warnings), debt collection calls, calls from some health care providers (provided they are not trying to sell you anything), and messages from charities, provided the charities make the call themselves. If a charity hires someone to make robocalls on its behalf, the robocalls can only go to members of the charity or to previous donors. They also must include an automated option to let you stop future calls.

    So what should you do if you get an illegal robocall?

    Unfortunately, robocalls are cheap, and it is easy for scammers and telemarketers to make calls over the internet from anywhere in the world.

    Hang up. Don’t press any number. The recording might say that pressing a number will let you speak to a live operator or remove you from their call list, but it might instead lead to your receiving more calls. (The same goes for junk emails or spam that you receive on your computer. Do not click to unsubscribe, as doing so could result in only more spam.)

    You may be able to reduce unwanted calls by using the FTC Do Not Call Registry. Go to donotcall.gov, or call 888-382-1222 from the phone you want to register. There is no charge to register your phone. If you receive an unwanted call after your number has been on the National Registry for 31 days, you can report it to the FTC. Report the number given on your caller ID and any number that you were told to call back.

    This article was taken from the FTC consumer information website, consumer.ftc.gov.

     

     

    old time food truckFood Trucks at Fearrington

    Perhaps the pandemic has left you tired of eating the same home cooking every night? At the request of residents who felt that way, the FHA Board has agreed to have food trucks serving outside the Gathering Place on a trial basis. Volunteers agreed to organize the enterprise, and while we initially hoped to have six trucks over the course of six weeks, the reality is that trucks book weeks (if not months) in advance. The good news is that there are five trucks scheduled to visit the Village over the next several weeks. The details are provided on the accompanying flyer, which provides web links to menus. Also, worth mentioning is the food being offered appeals to all, with a full range of vegetarian items alongside seafood, poultry, and meat.

    The trucks will be in The Gathering Place Parking Lot from 5 to 7:30 pm on the dates given. Some trucks let you order ahead online, but not all. The expectation is that after you place your order and pick up your food, you will take it back home to eat. There will be no tables set up by the truck, and the Fitch’s have asked that residents not use the seating and tables at the Goat or at the Roost. Please avoid using the Village Center as a place to consume the food.

    If this initial trial is successful, we hope it will be possible to encourage other trucks to visit the Village.

     


     

    Features

     

     

    How to Stream Life

    Story and photos by Ed Lallo

    It has become a hot topic, even though it offers nothing but peace and calm. “Will it stay, or will it go?” That is the question.

    The Fearrington Village Homeowners Association Board is in the process of determining the fate of Beechmast Dam and the pond it has created from the waters flowing from the stream along the Creekwood Trail.

    Here are a few photos taken over the course of this year of the Creekwood Trail and the stream that feeds into Beechmast Pond. Both the trail and the pond are underutilized. Perhaps the question should be “How can we make the area pay for itself?”

    Ed Lallo collage June 2021

    About Ed Lallo

    My business card read “photographer”; actually, it should have read “problem-solver.” My career has been telling stories with a camera. Photography is a powerful communication tool that reaches a wide variety of audiences.

    A career that began in photojournalism for newspapers later expanded to contributing photographer for People Magazine and then work for corporate clients. I have traveled the world to places Google has yet to map; shooting for IBM, ExxonMobil, Learjet, Jack Daniels, Hallmark Cards, CSX Railroad, Walt Disney, Berkshire Hathaway and Dupont to name just a few.

    “Life is a journey with countless stories all along the way. The most compelling are punctuated with striking images that call you back time and again.”

     

    Many Residents Paused Their Saturday Routine for “Paws for a Cause”

    By Pat Biggers, Women of Fearrington Publicity Cochair

    Barbara Gilbert, event chair, shops at the sales table manned by Kate West.  Photo by Pat Biggers.

    In April, Women of Fearrington held a spring fundraiser for our Wonderful Options Fund grants program. Paws for a Cause, a first-time effort, turned out to be a big hit! Although the Covid-19 pandemic presented us with many difficulties in execution, it also presented us with greater needs than ever for the women and children of Chatham County whom we put front and center in our fundraising efforts.

    Jo Bolig registers with Debbie Liebtag and Joyce Brennan.  Photo by Ed Lallo.

    Bob Biggers and Tucker.   Photo by Corrie Biggers.

    Thanks to the generous response of many local businesses in providing raffle prizes and the equally generous response of our residents who participated, we were able to raise almost $4000 on Saturday, April 17—and have a lot of fun besides!

    Each trail was marked and hosted, as here by Kathy Coughlan.  Photo by Ed Lallo.

    Everyone involved enjoyed a lovely spring day. For a $25 donation, participants had their choice of trail and start time, and they received a goodie bag with trail maps, treats, and a raffle ticket for some great prizes. They also had the opportunity to visit our sales table, which featured Beltie cards and tea towels, homemade dog biscuits, and other treats. Many residents have asked for this to become an annual event. Stay tuned!

    d1 Neighbors

    Neighbors Verity Dunphy, Judy Dimon, and Jackie Castle enjoy their stroll with Bubby, Izzy, and Maxi.  Photo by Ed Lallo.

    Paws for a Cause is a good example of how Women of Fearrington has been able to adapt in this challenging year to maintain their mission of “Learn, Laugh, and Lead!” Instead of monthly meetings at the Gathering Place, we had interesting Zoom webinars, featuring such topics as Pauli Murray, recycling, and travel through wine. Road trips were closer to home and followed CDC guidelines, with trips to the M&M alpaca farm, Mark Hewitt Pottery, and hiking at Jordan Lake. Small group outdoor gatherings were added for some socializing, such a hit that we plan to continue these post-Covid.

    Cathy Morehead and Bailey start down the Millcroft Path.  Photo by Ed Lallo.

    Our Annual Holiday Market used online ordering and timed pickups and was a bigger success than ever. Our Christmas toy donation to the Chatham County Department of Social Services was expedited through direct donations via Amazon and, since we publicized it beyond our own membership, we had contributions from the whole area. We invited other Fearrington clubs, including the Garden Club, the Green Scene, and the Genealogy Club, to participate in some of our programs, and we plan to expand this in the future.

    Art Gonales and Ann Melchior ready to hit the trail at Camden Park with Clancy.  Photo by Ed Lallo.

    When we hear that “It takes a village,” now we understand which village that is! Thanks to all who did their part and more to make this an outstanding year for Women of Fearrington.

    As ever, for more information, go to www.womenoffearrington.org. We would love for you to join us!

     


     

     

    Celebrate 250 Years with Chatham County

    By Jackie Walters, Features Co-Editor

    Chatham250 012021 marks Chatham County’s semiquincentennial (i.e., 250th anniversary of its founding). Although the celebration kicked off with Founding Day on April 10, county residents still have many opportunities to mark the occasion before official events conclude in October.
    According to Hilary Pollan, Community Partners Analyst for Chatham County, many events offer both in-person and virtual ways to participate. For example, the Great Chatham County Campout on June 26 corresponds with the Great American Campout held annually in June. Residents are invited to camp at a designated campsite, in your own backyard or in a homemade fort in your living room, and, for one night only, at the B. Everett Jordan Dam in Moncure. Community organizations will be sharing videos about camping tips, conservation, and the natural environment of Chatham County.

    The campout, like most events, is sponsored by Chatham250, the official home of the celebration: HOME | Chatham 250. Its mission is “to celebrate Chatham County through diverse community centered events and activities that highlight Chatham’s uniqueness, rich history, and promising future.” There are five Celebration Themes: Creative Arts, Growth and Change, Agriculture, Diversity and Community, and Natural Environment.

    Five major events highlight these themes (Chatham 250 Events | Chatham 250). In addition to April’s Founding Day, these include the Chatham County Communities of Color virtual lecture series beginning May 28 and concluding on Juneteenth (June 19); an Agricultural Photo contest on August 1; a Sidewalk Chalk Festival on September 11; and the Grand Finale in Siler City on October 23—the Chatham 250 Parade/Carvana. Learn more and register for these events and for theme passports on HOME | Chatham 250.

    With over 31 community partners, Chatham 250 offers several ways to stay informed and be involved. According to Hilary, the best ways to stay abreast of opportunities are to register for the Chatham250 passport; check out Chatham County social media (e.g., Chatham250 on Facebook, Twitter, and Nextdoor); and subscribe to the Chatham News & Record and Chatham Magazine.

    In addition to being a participant, there are also volunteer opportunities. Fearrington resident, Kimberly Steiner, wrote about her volunteer project for the Chatham County NC Historical Association (CCHA) in the April issue of The Belted Gazette [“Newcomer to Fearrington Records Chatham County’s Historic Structures”]. A primary partner of the semiquincentennial, CCHA is collaborating on five history projects this year, including profiling county artists and compiling histories of county churches. Perhaps you’ve been curious about all the roads nearby with ‘church’ or ‘chapel’ in their names?

    Questions about events and opportunities? Email Hilary Pollan at chatham250thanniversary@gmail.com.

    Whatever term you want to use for this momentous occasion in the life of our county—semiquincentennial, Quarter Millennial or Sestercentennial, join in the celebration. The next significant 250th will be the United States’ semiquincentennial in 2026!

     

     

    It’s a Hit! It’s Outta Here!

    Story and Photos by Doug Rhodes

    Karen West, Covid-19 Slugger

    The neighbors on Woodham gave Covid-19 a mighty whack, sending it well over the fence for a true home run. This all happened when these residents resurrected their monthly face-to-face Wine on Woodham driveway gatherings. Now mask-less, neighbors had fun wearing nametags and making reintroductions over adult beverages and fancy hors d'oeuvres. The pleasures of the afternoon were well supported by two jazz musicians who played old favorites, took requests, and soloed with their own riffs.

    Jazz musicians “Griffanzo” Griffin and Danny Grewen

    It was the trussed up Covid-19, however, rendered helpless in its confines, that was joyfully sent to oblivion by eager celebrants. The bruised cantaloupe festooned with raspberries carried the day and signaled the return of the Fearrington spirit and bliss.

     

     

    Fearrington Puzzler96webThe Fearrington Puzzler

    Welcome Fearrington Puzzlers! We’ll offer this feature regularly for readers who enjoy learning more about our Village. We hope you’ll put on your puzzler hats, do a bit of research (on the FHA site perhaps), and then share your answers with your neighbors. You’ll find the answer to this puzzler in the next issue.

    June’s Puzzler

    Submitted by Bill Sharpe

    A large concrete block still sits on the back of a large lot off Barnsley Road at the eastern edge of Fearrington Village. What was it used for?

     

    The concrete block in June’s Puzzler

     

    Resurrection fern on a downed oak tree

     

    May’s Puzzler Answer

    Submitted by Fearrington horticulturist Betty King

    WHO: Resurrection fern
    Pleopeltis (Polypodium) polypodioides

    WHERE: Can be found growing on a downed oak tree across from 639 Spindlewood and also in the Woodland Garden at the entrance to Weymouth Close.

    Resurrection fern usually grows on tree trunks and branches and is not often found in Fearrington. It reproduces from spores, not seeds, and in spring, the new growth begins as a fiddlehead and uncoils to become a frond. During dry periods, the fern curls up and looks dead, but it revives once rains come.


     


     

    Announcements

     

    Fearrington Groups and Organizations


     

    Mah JonggJune Mah Jongg!!

    The Dragons are Ready to Play!

    Fearrington Dragons Mah Jongg plays on the second Saturday of the month from 1-4 pm. We will play on Saturday, June 12, at 1 pm. We meet at The Gathering Place and will play under their guidelines. (Read the policy.)

    As such we must limit our number to 36. (Sign up for a space.) Because of this limitation, it is important to cancel if you discover you are not able to play so someone else can take your spot. Annual dues have been waived for 2021.

    Bring your own beverage; no food is allowed.

    These games are for experienced players.

    May the jokers be ever in your favor!!

    Contact Robin Weinberger at weinrob@msn.com or 919-219-5228 or Polly Williams at pw82550@gmail.com or 919-478-4260 if you have any questions.

    Want to learn how to play? Contact Mary Donna Pond at mdpond@nc.rr.com.

     

     

    Fearrington Duplicate Bridge Clubduplicate bridge

    “Take a Detour from the Ordinary: Play Bridge”

    Fearrington Duplicate Bridge Club meets every Wednesday in June. Our game is held at The Gathering Place beginning at 1 pm. We play 24 boards.

    Since each partnership is compared to others who have points in their range, you can be successful regardless of your ability level. We also welcome observers so you can learn if it is right for you. Generally, we have five or more tables. We then ask that you come with your Covid-19 vaccination notification, your own drink (should you want one), and $7 (which covers the cost of the handouts, use of the room, and supplies). The first time you play with us, there is no cost.

    Should you be a single, you may bring someone outside of Fearrington who also has a love of duplicate bridge.

    Any questions? Please contact Jean Hjelle, 919-548-6216.

     

     

    Film ClubFearrington Film Club

    Covid-19 restrictions are relaxing, and we look forward to a time when the Film Club can resume showing movies at The Gathering Place. The guidelines that are in place by the FHA will be followed. There will be no popcorn and treats until the “No Food” restriction is relaxed or removed. We’re eager to see familiar faces and new ones. All past paid memberships will be honored, and we’ll welcome new members and guests once guidelines are in place that will allow us to show movies safely and at a level that is comfortable for audience and Film Club team members.

     

     

    NEW! Fearrington RV Club?RV Club

    We are RV enthusiasts and now own a 25-foot motorhome. From 2015 to 2017, we lived full-time in our 5th wheel and travelled the country. I would like to explore the possibility of starting an RV Club in Fearrington. If you are interested in gathering with other RV enthusiasts to discuss RV'ing and your favorite places to RV, please email Cathy Janis at cathyjanis@gmail.com.

     

     

    Swim Croquet Club logoFearrington Swim & Croquet Club

    Summertime is here! Plan to escape to the club to cool off in the pool and to relax on our deck and lawn. This year several tables and chairs are set up for picnics and games on the upper lawn where volleyball, tether ball, horseshoes, shuffleboard, cornhole and badminton games are available. You may want to find out if any food trucks are planned for the evening before you make dinner this season. Food truck details will be posted on our bulletin board as we get more information.

    The water aerobics class schedule is on our website and also posted on the pool bulletin board where last-minute updates are added.

    Looking for a croquet partner or foursome? Ask to be added to the Croquet Players list. The list will be shared with members interested in setting up play. Contact Jan Droke at jantomdro@gmail.com.

    We’re looking forward to welcoming new and renewing members this year. Dues are not increasing. Former members who did not join or who did not suspend their membership last year may pay the suspension fee now ($25 per adult member) and avoid the reinstatement fee of $100. To find our website, go to the Swim and Croquet page under the Group Section of the FHA website. If you have questions send an email to: fearringtonswimcroquet@gmail.com.

     

     

    Fearrington Village SingersFVS logo

    How Singing Influences Our Health

    The Fearrington Village Singers want to share the following benefits of singing—whether you sing in the shower or want to join us in the fall (if the pandemic allows). Experts recommend singing for at least 5 minutes daily, equating the benefits with that of physical exercise. (Adapted from AdiDisha Yoga.)

    • Singing communicates to the body the “right” vibes that increase our vitality
    • When singing, special chemicals release in the human brain that help us feel peace and joy
    • Singing improves blood circulation in the throat area, which has a beneficial effect on vocal cords, tonsils, and numerous lymph nodes in the throat—and therefore significantly increases local immunity (in other words, we rarely catch colds)
    • Singing improves the blood supply, which leads to brain activity intensification—the brain starts working more intensely, memory improves, any information is easier to perceive
    • Singing is very useful for lung diseases, as it creates respiratory gymnastics that promote the development of chest and proper breathing, while significantly reducing the number of acute lung conditions
    • With regular singing, the levels of immunoglobulin and hydrocortisone, which are signs of good immunity, increase in the body
    • Singing has led to methods that treat stuttering and help improve diction
    • Singing is used even in the fight against obesity—when nourished people still feel hunger pangs, singing two or three songs instead of eating helps to alleviate the urge to eat
    • Singing improves blood supply in the head and generally rejuvenates the body, improving skin condition

     

     

    WOF CMYK OvalWomen of Fearrington

    Activities of Women of Fearrington are winding down now for the summer break. We celebrated our successful, if unusual, year with a luncheon and tour at Lavender Oaks Farm in late May and look forward to a “new normal” year beginning in the fall!

    WoF members with a birthday in April, May, or June will celebrate at lunch from 12:00—2:00 pm on Thursday, June 10. Each person orders in advance from The Belted Goat, where we can enjoy outdoor dining.

    We plan on holding more birthday lunches in the coming months for those with birthdays in the second half of the year. For more information, contact Eileen McCorry: mccorrye@gmail.comPlease register here if you plan to attend in June.

    For continuing up to date information, do check our website, www.womenoffearrington.org.

     

     

    Community Agencies

    Chatham ConnectingChatham Connecting logo

    June is a great month to get going and get active. Chatham Connecting, www.chathamconnecting.org, lists more than 100 non-profits in our county that need help with donations and your volunteer time. With schools closed for the summer, check out our website’s special button that connects directly to youth volunteer opportunities. For adults, you can search for agencies or organizations needing volunteers and specific donations by clicking on one of the volunteer categories, with further information listed by both volunteer activity and interest. And if you prefer to work from home, we have a button that lists those opportunities. Chatham Connecting is a one-stop website to learn about all volunteer opportunities in our neighborhood. We thank you for your support.

     

     


    fcares logo

     


     

     

    Fearrington Cares Staff News

    Fearrington Cares is delighted to welcome Teresa Balatico (teresa@fearringtoncares.org) as the new Administrative Coordinator and at the same time wish Pat Skiver a happy retirement! Although Pat nominally retired years ago when she moved from Michigan to NC, she subsequently became the first direct employee of Fearrington Cares and has served creatively and generously since 2008. Years of Board volunteers (especially treasurers!) and FC staff have been inspired by her big heart and have been enriched by her friendship. We are all grateful for her service!

    Good fortune continues to shine on Fearrington Cares as we welcome Teresa. After an extensive search and now several days of orientation, we are discovering Teresa’s talents and compassion for others. Previous work has prepared her well for the multiple aspects of the role of Administrative Coordinator.

     

     

    FC Cooking ClassThree Sauces, Two Sides, and One Chicken: A Zoom Cooking Class

    Thursday, June 10, 7:00 pm via Zoom

    Nationally certified personal chef, former hospitality manager, and restaurateur, Leslie Chartier, is now the Chef/Owner of The Travelling Cafe (thetravellingcafe.com), where she offers a custom meal delivery service, dinner party catering, and cooking classes. At the Cafe’s culinary studio in Pittsboro, she and other local chefs teach and entertain via online, in-home private, and in-studio public cooking classes. She is also renowned for her bespoke cakes for special occasions and weddings. Leslie received her formal culinary training and bachelor’s degree in Hospitality Management at Chatham County Community College. She was a class lead and culinary instructor for The Cooking School at Southern Season during its final two years.

    Leslie will instruct us in the preparation of Mustard-Tarragon Cream Sauce (a tasty French classic), Zhoug (Israeli Spicy Cilantro Pesto), and Monkey Gland Sauce from South Africa (no monkeys will be harmed in the making of this Zoom class!). She will show us how to make haricot verts and new potatoes to accompany a roasted chicken and complete the lesson by using leftovers to prepare cold chicken and potato salads. Recipes will be provided.

     

     

    Advance Directive Check-Up

    No one should receive less care than they desire when living with a disability or chronic condition. How much medical care would you want if you had Alzheimer’s disease or another type of dementia? Many of us have real concerns that cognitive decline might impair our last years, but advance directives or living wills typically do not document our wishes in this specific situation. Unfortunately, dementia is an important factor that prevents people from guiding their own care. If, when you review your own documents, you find you want to add specific directives for dementia, a form may be downloaded from the nonprofit website dementia-directive.org.

     

     

    Ambassador, Anyone?

    Have you been wondering how to help maintain the high quality of life that Fearrington Village provides? One good way to “give back” is to serve as an Ambassador for Fearrington Cares. The main job of an Ambassador is to greet new neighbors soon after they move in and acquaint them with the services and programs of Fearrington Cares. Also, each Ambassador is asked to host at least two informal get-togethers a year—simple coffees or wine and cheese socials to which both new and established neighbors are invited to come, meet one another, and learn about current Fearrington Cares services.

    Fearrington Village has twelve Ambassadors now, but we are seeking many more to cover every neighborhood. We need Ambassadors for Bush Creek, Camden Park South, Countryhouse Closes(except Weymouth), Henderson Place, the Historic District, The Knolls, McDowell Place, Montgomery, Richmond, Rutherford Close, and The Woods.

    Please contact one of the following people if you’d like to know more about becoming a Fearrington Cares Ambassador: Janine Griffin (336-209-4204, jkgriffin001@gmail.com), Anne Henkels (919-542-2164, henkelsanne@gmail.com), Cathy Somer (919-533-6559, cathysomer2@gmail.com), or Karen Metzguer (919-542-6877, karen@fearringtoncares.org).

     

    Zoom Movement Classes, Support Groups & Education Programs Links Are on Our Website, www.fearringtoncares.org.

    Zoom Movement Classes, Support Groups, and Education Programs links are on our website, www.fearringtoncares.org. Click on the blue Zoom button on our home page and scroll to the correct program/class/support group. If you would like to practice a Zoom connection and meeting, email info@fearringtoncares.org and we will set that up.

     


     

    Join Movement Classes via Zoom
    www.fearringtoncares.org

    All classes 11:30 am

    Mondays—Chair Yoga

    Wednesdays—Otago Fall-Prevention Exercises

    Thursdays—Line Dancing

    Join Support Groups via Zoom
    www.fearringtoncares.org

    Caregiver's Support Group:
    Wednesdays, June 2 and 16, 12:30–2:00 pm

    Living with Chronic Conditions:
    Thursday, June 3 and 17, 1:00 pm

    Parkinson's Support Group:
    No June meeting

    Health Services Offered at the Fearrington Cares Center

    Nurse Consultation:
    Appointment required, call 919-542-6877

    Foot Clinic:
    Thursday, June 17, appointment required, call 919-542-6877

    Support Groups Meeting in Person

    Alcoholics Anonymous:
    Mondays 10 am, Fearrington Cares Center 

     

     

    Are Pet Owners Healthier? Our Pets & Our Heartspuppy in owners arms

    We all know our pets warm our hearts with their unconditional love and acceptance, but do you know how good they are for the physical health of our hearts as well?

    1. Pet owners have lower blood pressures, lower cholesterol levels, and lower triglyceride levels than non-pet owners, all of which reduce risk factors for cardiovascular disease. These markers also decrease after pet adoption. (American Heart Association)

    2. When pet owners encounter physical or psychological stress, they show smaller increases in heart rate and blood pressure and a faster return to baseline values after the stress has ended. The reactivity to stress is even lower and recovery faster when the person’s own pet is present. This resilience in the face of stress reduces cardiovascular risk. (American Heart Association)

    3. Petting and stroking a dog or cat decreases levels of cortisol (the stress hormone) and increases levels of serotonin (the “feel good” hormone). (Cleveland Clinic) Petting an animal also releases oxytocin, a hormone associated with bonding. (Scientific American) All of these chemical reactions benefit heart health and create a sense of physical and mental well-being as a bonus.

    The responsibility of a pet is not for everyone; if you choose it, Fearrington Cares encourages an ongoing thoughtful review of safety in your home with a pet. When we open our hearts to our pets, they may repay us by helping to keep those very same hearts healthy. In return for our care of them, our pets can take care of us, not only emotionally, but physically. Chatham Animal Rescue and Education (CARE) is a non-profit animal welfare organization that promotes responsible pet ownership through educating the community, providing targeted spay-neuter programs, and fostering homeless dogs and cats until they are placed in loving, permanent homes. Please visit them at www.chathamanimalrescue.org.

     

     

    Swallowing Disorders Support Group

    If you or someone you know has been diagnosed with dysphagia or another swallowing disorder, you are invited to join a local support group facilitated by speech pathologist Nancy Vallejo Smith that meets via Zoom. Email SSGCarolinas@gmail.com for more details and a link to join. Additional information is found on the National Foundation of Swallowing Disorders website at swallowingdisorderfoundation.com/swallowing-support-groups/.

      



     

    Beltie on a bench for emailweb96LPWelcome to Our New Residents!

    The following persons were added to the Fearrington Village Directory between April 15 and May 14:

    NameAddressContact Information
    Frank R. GAILOR
    &
    Cindy D. WATKINS 
    4031 South McDowell  Frank's Email: fgailor@hedgehogholdings.com
    Cindy's Email: dunnavantwatkins@gmail.com
    Frank's Cell: 919-656-3008
    Cindy's Cell: 336-504-0945 
    Lily T. GREEN
    &
    Gerald HASKINS 
    175 Wintersage  Lily's Email: lilygreen@me.com
    Gerald's Email: geraldmhaskins@gmail.com
    Lily's Cell: 214-215-0199
    Gerald's Cell: 352-258-5434 
    Carol S. HAYES
    &
    Dr. James (Jim) R. HAYES MD, PHD 
    594D Woodbury  Carol's Email: soccahayes@wi.rr.com
    Jim's Email: gymhz@wi.rr.com
    Home: 919-704-8576
    Carol's Cell: 414-639-2667
    Jim's Cell: 414-322-2052 
    Mary LUCAS  G-303 G Wing  Home: mdlucasg303@gmail.com
    Home: 919-704-8277 
    Cameron MORGAN
    &
    Allison ROUNDS
    41 Benchmark Cameron's Email: cthomasmorgan@gmail.com
    Allison's Email: allisonrounds@gmail.com
    Deborah Karen YOUNG 852 Langdon Deborah's Email: deborahkusa@yahoo.com
    Deborah's Cell: 919-601-3438

     

    Are you a new resident? Visit the website at https://fearringtonfha.org and on the top menu click on “Directory.” Then, in the drop-down menus click first on “New Resident” then “List Me in the Directory.” and fill in the resulting form to let the web team know of your arrival.

    Then, in the "Login Form" on the upper left, click "Create an account" and follow the instructions. Doing so will give you full access to website features. The account activation process is described here:

    https://www.fearringtonfha.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=87

    Are you an existing resident whose contact information has changed? Don’t forget to update your listing on the FearringtonFHA.org web site. On the landing page, click on the Directory tab on the top menu and then on Update Preferences on the drop-down menu. When you update your contact information online, the updates will be included in the FHA Directory & Handbook printed in January each year. Stay in touch with your fellow residents by keeping your contact information current.

     

     

     

    June 2021 CalendarFearrington June Calendar96web

    The Gathering Place is open with Covid-19 guidelines in place. These guidelines will impact the way group meetings are held. Check with the listed contact person for more information about any restrictions.

    Day/Date/TimeOrganizationEventContact
    Thursday
    June 10
    Noon – 2 pm 
    Women of Fearrington  Birthday Luncheon  Eileen McCorry
    (917) 509-6815 
    Meeting Weekly in June...  
    Every Wednesday
    1 pm 
    Duplicate Bridge  Duplicate Bridge  Jean Hjelle
    919-548-6216
    jeanshjelle@gmail.com

     

     

    A New Brood of Ducklings in Camden Park 

    JDickson ducklings

    Sophie, Mama Mallard, and ducklings    Photo by Josie Dickson 

     
  • FHA Newsletter, March 2021

    fearrington NL logo

    HOMEOWNERS’  ASSOCIATION  NEWSLETTER
    March 2021        Volume 40       Number 3

     

    President's Message

    Carl and the March Hare

    Hare and Usness

    I think I saw the March Hare bounding through the woods, telling us that Spring is just ahead. Plants and trees will be blooming, which always gives us a spirit of renewal. As FHA faces the challenges of 2021 and beyond, we hope that this spirit will inspire more of us to offer to help in some way. We all depend on what I call “Usness.”

    Spring, Usness, and renewal will, I hope include thoughts such as: What have our lives been like for the last 12 months? What can we change to make things better? What do I value most in the village? What can I do to promote those values?

    Fearrington Village is much more than a village; it’s the size of a small town. But it retains one essential character of a village—we all care about our neighbors. To preserve the features we love, there are tasks that need to be accomplished, some of them highly skilled, some quite routine. Large towns have paid staff to do most of this, but we do not. We rely on the old-fashioned idea of doing for ourselves.

    Like many residents, an important part of moving to Fearrington Village for my wife Kathleen and I was what we saw as a chance to be in a neighborhood where people shared common goals and faced the issues of “aging in place” together, i.e., Usness. A personal example of that in action this past year came when my wife broke her ankle. Word spread quickly across our neighborhood, and our friends volunteered to form a roster to bring food to us. They were genuinely concerned about Kathleen’s well-being (and I suspect held concerns about my skills as a caregiver).

    The FHA Board is simply a group of residents who volunteer to represent all of us. Terms of our directors are limited and subject to elections so that there is some rotation among us. This ensures we stay grounded in addressing what we genuinely want to have done. You have seen that spirit recently in the Community Survey, which helped to inform our board about what residents want. The FHA board depends on the many volunteers who help get things accomplished. This improved newsletter, for example, would not be possible without volunteers, and our progress on Wastewater Management was achieved because of the talented people who joined our vice president to form a task force.

    Many of you know that we have been searching for someone to take the role of Secretary to our Board. It is not an easy role to fill, and the term itself may be misleading; this person is a member of our executive committee who does much more than take minutes and maintain files. As an example of residents taking on volunteer roles, Pam Bailey has stepped forward to fill much of that role while we search for a person to fill the position on a longer-term basis. Even then, Pam wants to stay involved in a volunteer role.

    You will see often in this newsletter that we are searching for volunteers for different purposes. We plan to bring more structure into recruiting and assigning volunteers from the rich talent bank in our village, and Pam Bailey hopes to become very active in this effort. Please consider volunteering. It is “us helping us.” Chris Jaeger, Director of Community Affairs, is preparing a list of roles that need to be filled, some requiring certain talents or interests, some that just need some of your time and energy. Some would be long-term commitments; some would be occasional jobs that need doing. I think you might find a slot that you think would be satisfying and fulfilling for you and a great help to others.

    I once saw a comment about volunteering: “Noah’s Ark was built by volunteers; the Titanic was built by professionals.” Those of us involved in preserving our village are not professionals at it. It does mean, though, that these may be the only jobs you can find where you are guaranteed a 50% pay raise every year.


     

     

    Fearrington Homeowners’
    Association Newsletter

    The Newsletter is the official publication of our Fearrington Homeowners’ Association (FHA), produced by and for residents of Fearrington Village in Pittsboro, NC. The Newsletter contains community news, reports from FHA Board members, items of interest to residents, and announcements of club and neighborhood activities.

    The Newsletter is published electronically eleven times a year (July/August is a combined issue). A PDF copy of the current issue can be found on the FHA website: fearringtonfha.org.

    Submissions

    Content deadlines are the 15th of the previous month. Send submissions to: editors@fearringtonfha.org. All persons submitting content will receive a confirmation email.

    Do you have content for an upcoming newsletter? Email us at the above address and we will send you the "Newsletter Guidelines" and "Style Sheet".

    Newsletter Staff:

    Jan Kowal Ann Melchior
    Leslie Palmer Deborah Repplier
    Jackie Walters  

    Printing and Distribution:

    Carol Kurtz Barbara Amago
    Fearrington Homeowners’ Association
    Board Members

    Fearrington Homeowners’ Association (FHA) is a volunteer, non-profit organization dedicated to the health, safety, and welfare of residents. In addition to fostering resident participation, the Board is responsible for maintenance of common property and covenant enforcement. For additional details, including job descriptions, click on the “FHA” tab on the FHA webpage (fearringtonfha.org).

    Officers  
    President: Carl Angel
    Vice President: Rose Krasnow
    Interim Secretary: Pam Bailey
    Treasurer: Tony Daniels
    Directors  
    Communications: Gordon Pitz
    Community Affairs: Chris Jaeger
    Covenants: Eric Frank
    Grounds and Landscaping: Jesse Fearrington
    Health, Safety and Security: Warren Ort
    Infrastructure and Facilities: Mark Haslam

     


     

    From the Editors

    From the EditorNewsletter Naming Contest Result—We Have Our New Name

    Last fall, we announced a contest to rebrand our forty-year-old FHA newsletter. Soon thereafter, readers submitted 51 names for consideration. In January, we invited the community to vote for their favorite among our five finalists, which were: The Fearrington Villager, The Fearrington Post, The Belted Gazette, The Fearrington Times, and The Fearrington Chronicle.

    And the number one choice? Receiving 30% of the 447 votes cast, the winner is The Belted Gazette.
    Our team is gratified the winning name will allow us to feature a Beltie as our newsletter mascot. Even better, John Webster, the resident submitting the winning name, is a genuine fan of the Belted Galloway cow.

    Since we conceived of this contest last summer, I’ve learned it takes time, work, and patience to find just the right name and design the perfect new look to go with it. For now, we are doing the housework necessary to launch a new name and look later this spring. April is our goal, but we want to get it right, not fast.

    A shout-out to resident Steve Stewart for his help with our poll on Survey Monkey, the FHA’s online survey tool that helped us find our winning name.

    We will feature an article about contest winner, John Webster, when we roll out our new name and look in an upcoming issue.

    —Ann Melchior, Manager


     

     

    From Our FHA Board

     

     

    video conference 5230779 640FHA Open Meeting: Survey Responses and Beechmast Pond

    An open meeting for residents was held via a webinar on Tuesday, February 16. The meeting was attended by 210 registered residents. This is probably an underestimate of the number of viewers, since several couples may have watched together with only one person signing in.

    FHA President Carl Angel gave an introductory address in which he described the difficulties we have encountered as Associa/HRW took over management responsibilities from Towne Properties and steps the company has taken to make sure operations run smoothly from now on.

    Steve Stewart, a member of the Lifestyle Subcommittee, summarized the results of the recent community assessment survey. A 53% return rate for the survey suggests that the results give an accurate picture of what residents value most about living here and what concerns them. Most appreciated are the attractiveness of the village, the neighbors, the walking trails, neighborhood safety, and Fearrington Cares. Of most concern are wastewater issues, the future of the community after the developer leaves, the Village Center, and infrastructure issues.

    Tony Daniels, FHA Treasurer, discussed the implications of the survey for future action. He pointed out that some concerns, e.g., the Village Center, are not under control of the FHA. He noted that most residents say they are willing to help in addressing their major concerns, and he discussed how important it is that residents step forward to volunteer their services. The Board hopes to match the skills and abilities of those who would be willing to help with the needs the committees have to find volunteers.

    Jesse Fearrington, Director, Grounds and Lanscaping, discussed the issues involved in maintaining Beechmast Pond. Maintaining the pond is one of the larger expense items in the FHA budget, and the cost is increasing every year. Erosion in the watershed generates sediment that is gradually filling the pond. Regular dredging is expensive and cannot maintain an adequate water depth. There is a distinct possibility that future developments will make the situation worse.

    Last year the Board commissioned a study by Kris Bass Engineering (KBE) to see if there might be a more cost-effective way to deal with these problems. Based on their study, KBE presented three different approaches to developing a long-range solution. The October issue of the Newsletter contains an article describing the three alternatives. The solutions were described, along with the costs of implementing each. The Board’s preference is for removing the pond and restoring the stream to its natural flow. This option is the most expensive initially, but long-term costs would be the lowest, especially if construction costs increase.

    Tony Daniels then discussed funding issues raised by the Beechmast Pond options. He summarized the existing capital expense improvement plan, which addresses needs that might arise in the next 20 years. He explained how an investment in Beechmast Pond might be covered with some reallocation of funds, e.g., from a planned expansion of The Gathering Place. He also emphasized how factors beyond our control make the need for an early decision critical.

    One more open meeting is planned for April, in which residents will have a chance to discuss the issue further. A survey of residents is planned for early May, with a decision about the direction to be taken being made by the end of May.

    Residents attending the webinar were able to ask questions of the panel. Over 50 questions were submitted, some dealing with the two main topics, others addressing issues not discussed in the presentations. The panel provided answers to some of the questions, primarily those dealing with Beechmast Pond. Answers to all the questions were provided afterwards and are available on the FHA website. If the answers are not available when this issue of the newsletter first becomes available, they will be provided as soon as possible. A recording of the webinar is also available for a limited period of time and can be accessed from the same site.

    —Gordon Pitz, Director, Communications (communications@fhaboard.org)

     

     

    Accessing the FHA Website

    Last month I tried to explain how easy it is to access the FHA website from the Newsletter. In fact, if you are reading the newsletter online, you are already looking at the website. The menu is at the top of your screen window and tapping the small panel with the sketch of the Beltie will take you to the home page. (Please don’t do that yet unless you know how to use the back button on your browser to get back here).

    You do not need to be logged in to the website in order to access a lot of useful information, but one or two important features do require you to have an account and to log in. This month I’ll explain how to create an account and log in. As with many online operations, it’s not difficult if you know what to look for.

    You can find a good description of what to do at the following link:

    https://www.fearringtonfha.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=87&Itemid=1019

    An abbreviated version is provided here. It will be helpful if you have a way to read this, or what is provided at the link given above, while separately entering data into a second web page. Otherwise, you may need to take notes on what follows.

    Warning Not logged inpng

    If you are not logged in, you will see a warning at the top of the page (left).

    If you already have an account, go to the home page and enter your username and password where indicated in the column on the left (you do remember your username and password, right?). However, if you do not have an account, you should click on “Create an account” (outlined here in red).

    This will bring up a form for you to fill in. Only Fearrington residents may have accounts, so a manager will check your name and email address. Under “Name,” provide both first and last name. Provide a username or user ID, which must be unique, and an email address, which must also be different from any other user’s.

    Creating an account

    Finally, you will need to pass a test to prove that you are not a robot (you’re not, are you?). Don’t worry—the test is not hard, and if you do get it wrong, you can try again.Registration form

    There is one more step in the verification process. As soon as your form is submitted, an email will be sent to you. If you think you did not get one, check your spam folder. The email will contain a verification link that you should tap. When you do this, website managers will be able to confirm that you are a resident. This may take several hours, but you will then receive another email confirming your registration. You may now log in, and begin further exploration of the website.
    Next month I’ll point out some of the features you can access, both with and without an account.

    Happy browsing.

      


     

    Features

     

     

    Introducing Fearrington Book Groups

    Part 1 of a 2-part series

    By Katie Baer and Maggie Pearson

    book groupsTypically, reading is a solitary pleasure.

    But that pleasure can be amplified if others share in discussing the book.

    At least, that’s the experience of dozens of people who live in Fearrington and participate in book groups. They are among the estimated 5 million people in this country who are members of a book group/reading group. The basic template is similar for most of the groups: people select a book, all members read it, and they gather to discuss it.

    However, the variations are endless: some groups are composed only of women, some of men only, and a few are coed. The groups vary by how they select the books, how they organize discussion, and whether they focus on fiction or nonfiction.

    But what all groups have in common is the pleasure of sharing thoughts about a book with friends.
    We talked to members of several book groups in Fearrington to find out how they operate and why they are successful. Here are a few of the things we learned:

    • The benefits are great and wide-ranging. Members enjoy developing a sense of camaraderie and neighborhood community as well as intellectual stimulation—“reading outside my comfort zone” was a familiar phrase.
    • The books that the members read tend to be substantive fiction, especially “literary fiction,” but nonfiction and poetry are sometimes included.
    • To encourage maximum discussion, the groups typically limit membership to 6 to 12 members.
    • Covid-19 hasn’t shut down book groups—only changed them from in-person meetings to a virtual experience via Zoom or another platform. Before the pandemic when people met in members’ homes, food and drink were sometimes part of the event.

    Although the groups we profile are not currently accepting new members, we hope readers will use the information to open conversations, make connections and perhaps start a group of their own. (We offer suggestions on starting a book group at the end of this article.)

    The Roundtable, started more than 20 years ago, is the oldest women’s book group in Fearrington Village. Several of the 11 current members have been part of The Roundtable for years, continuing even after moving from Fearrington. Meetings continue via ZOOM but will resume in members’ homes once the pandemic is in the rearview mirror. According to one member, “The group is limited both by the size of people’s living rooms and the goal of giving everyone time to participate in the discussion.”

    In the spring, members vote on the next season’s books by choosing one title from 2-3 suggested by each member. The person who suggested a book becomes the facilitator. The Roundtable reads current fiction and, occasionally, classics.

    One member noted, “We appreciate good literature and look for books that will extend members’ ecology and community. Our members are well-read and well-prepared, and we don’t get too far afield in our discussions,” said one member. “We are tolerant of different opinions and that has opened my mind to new literature and ideas. I have encountered books I probably never would have read otherwise.”

    A few titles the group has liked: A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles and The Overstory by Richard Powers

    The Fearrington Havurah Book Club was started seven years ago by a woman new to Fearrington Village. Rita Dunkin said she missed the stimulation and fellowship of her group in Virginia and believed that other women might enjoy getting together to read good literature. Havurah means “friendship” in Hebrew, and broadening book club members’ social and intellectual engagement is the glue that helps hold the group together.

    Only women who are members of the Fearrington Havurah Club may join the book club. Rita said women have joined Havurah “just so they could then be a member of the book group.” Currently, there are 11 members, and the group meets at The Gathering Place. Generally, the club reads books with Jewish themes or by Jewish authors, but they occasionally choose a book like Caste by Isabel Wilkerson, for example, because its issues resonate with the club’s membership.

    Members suggest and vote on books for the next season in the spring. Usually, the person who suggested the book becomes the facilitator. One member said she especially liked the shared responsibility for leading the discussions.

    Rita noted that The Fearrington Havurah Book Club’s success came from the close communication among group members. “To sustain interest in the Havurah Book Club, or any book club,” said Rita, “people have to feel that they belong and are appreciated. Members of the Fearrington Havurah Book Club have diverse points of view on everything from politics to religion to social trends but having a common background and common goal for the club keeps us going.”

    Two recent reads: Song of the Jade Lily by Kirsty Manning and The Lost Girls of Paris by Pam Jenoff

    The Eclectics—the name says it all! The Eclectics is a group of women who read widely, mostly contemporary fiction, some classics, occasionally nonfiction. When they started in January 2002, the all-women’s group wanted to concentrate on well-written books that were thought-provoking.

    From the beginning, the group has maintained a steady commitment to reading good books and facilitating discussion that focuses on a book’s literary style, structure, and character development. The group’s method of selecting books assures that all members are engaged: each month, a different member chooses a book and leads the discussion. In pre-Covid-19 times, that member also hosted the group at her house. Since last spring, the meetings have transitioned to Zoom.

    One member commented, “I think there’s a tremendous level of respect and trust in the group, shown by the fact that we do not vote on books, but leave the choice to the member whose turn it is to lead the discussion.” Typically, the facilitator brings insights from various reviews and interviews of the author.

    Almost two decades of reading history—book, author, host—are captured in a master list. Two of the group’s recent favorites: Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes and Claire of the Sea Light by Edwidge Danticat

    Profiles of other book groups will appear in next month’s issue along with suggestions on how to start your own book group.


     

     

    Sophie Gets a New Home, But Keeps Her Name

    By Gordon Pitz (communications@fhaboard.org)

    Ducks of various kinds are often seen in Fearrington. Mallards come and go on the Camden ponds. Wood Duck boxes have been installed near ponds and open water, and recently two pairs of Mergansers settled on Beechmast pond.

    Jones Grove Cemetery

    Mallard duck and duckling
    Photo by Gordon Pitz

    Mergansers

    Mergansers taking off
    Photo by Alan Ziegler

    One day in spring of 2018, a large black duck with an elaborately calloused face arrived on the lower Camden pond. This caused something of a stir among human residents of Fearrington village, and probably among the avian population of Camden ponds as well.

    Dave Reynolds, who is not a Fearrington resident but lives nearby, often walks his dog Princeton in Camden Park. Dave owns several domestic ducks and recognized that this was a Muskovy. Once he realized the duck was going to remain in Camden Park, he started to feed it on a daily basis, and christened her Sophie.

    There are several Fearrington residents who also keep an eye on Sophie. Abigail English walks her dog Ginger by the pond and helps to feed her. Doug Zabor, his wife Magda, and their dog Karee befriended Dave. A small group of friends help pay towards food. Please note, Dave and others ensure that Sophie receives the appropriate amount and type of food. Please, if visiting, do not feed Sophie or any of the ducks. Although Dave does say that if someone wants to take kids and grandkids to "feed the ducks," a few thawed out frozen English peas are a nice treat.

    Sophocles

    Sophie the Muscovy Duck   Photo by Gordon Pitz

    Sophie is a domestic duck. Probably her owner did not want to keep her anymore, so left her at the Camden pond. Her wings had been clipped before she arrived. She can flap for short distances but doesn't really fly. She loves company, swims with the Mallards, greets the Blue Heron, and will waddle from lower to upper pond when her Mallard or Heron friends fly from one pond to the other.

    Last winter Dave, who does a lot of carpentry, considered building a shelter for Sophie that would keep her safe from predators. He planned it for over a year and designed one that could float but remain anchored. Doug Zabor put Dave in touch with Greg Fitch. They discussed the design, the paint color, and possible placement. They agreed that the house would mirror the gazebos in Camden Park and they settled on the current location in the lower pond.

    Jones Grove Cemetery

    Dave Reynolds about to install the house
    Photo by Doug Zabor

    The lid of the duck house is hinged. Inside is a wire mesh that allows waste to drop through to the pond. He built the house large enough to accommodate several ducks at a time. Dave has agreed to maintain the shelter and keep the straw fresh.

    To keep the house afloat, Dave used 4-inch PVC pipe he sealed under the platform. To test the platform, Dave and his brother Daniel launched it at Jordan Lake, and sat on it to make sure it would hold the weight of the house.

    Sophies House

    Sophie’s house, in place
    Photo by Gordon Pitz

    On a bitterly cold day, Dave donned a wet suit and screwed two long anchors into the lakebed. A few days later, Dave and Daniel installed the house. They floated it from the dam, then pushed it into its final location.

    Doug Zabor has created an account of the installation, using photographs that he and Abigail English took, together with a video. The story can be seen here on Google Photos.

    There has been some concern whether Sophie is able to get up onto the platform. The Mallards have no problems (see Dan Freehling’s photo). Sophie can mount the metal overflow ring in the upper pond, as seen in one of the photos in the illustrated story of the installation, so we hope she’s able to enter her own house.

    duck house

    Sophie and friends explore the new house
    Photo by Dan Freehling

    There was one more mystery about Sophie. When she first appeared in Fearrington, I was able to identify her as a Muskovy, based on the size and the face. Incidentally, the breed has nothing to do with Moscow (or Russia). They originated in South America and may have been named after the company that transported them to Europe.

    They are often said not to be true ducks; they may be closer to Geese than other breeds. It is not easy to tell whether a single bird is male or female, unlike the Mallards. However, based on the caruncles (the red wattles), I concluded it was a male, so christened it Musky (the breed’s origins notwithstanding).

    I assumed Dave Reynolds knew more about ducks than I did, but perhaps even he was not sure. He sent photos and a description to the Carolina Waterfowl Rescue (CWR). Is it really Sophie? Maybe it’s Musky. It didn’t matter. She, or he, is a welcome addition to the village.

    Well, as it turns out, CWR determined that, in spite of the pointed tail and proclivity to care for ducklings, Sophie is in fact a handsome male. His formal name is Sophocles, after the great Greek playwright. His familiar name can still be Sophie, or Soph.

    With many thanks to Dave Reynolds and Doug Zabor for their help in preparing this article.

     

     

    Scenes Around Fearrington

     

    A Red Shouldered Hawk lends an eye to our Neighborhood Watch. Both photos by Tony Daniels

     

     

     

     

     


     

    Announcements

     

    Fearrington Groups and Organizations


     

    Fearrington Bulls & Bears

    Bulls BearsThe Fearrington Bulls & Bears Investment Club is a group of Fearrington residents who are interested in improving their investment knowledge and capabilities. We meet monthly during non-summer months and communicate regularly through an email exchange group to share information, insights, and ideas about investing.

    Guests are welcome to participate in a meeting or in our email exchange group to gauge their interest in joining the Club. The next meeting will be held by Zoom on March 12, at 9:30 am.

    For more information about the Club, meetings, or the exchange, please contact:

    Anna Shearer, President, at 703-217-0322 or ashearer1219@gmail.com

     

     

    Fearrington Democratic Club

    Fearrington Dem Club SmThe Democratic Club’s March speaker will be NC State Senator Jeff Jackson, candidate for the US Senate in 2022. Senator Jackson is an Afghanistan veteran, former assistant district attorney, and current captain in the Army National Guard. First elected to the NC Senate in 2014, he has made statewide and national news for his commitment to ending HB2 (the ‘bathroom bill’), gerrymandering, and the ‘consent loophole’ in connection with sexual assault.

    For the Zoom link, use the contact form on the Club’s website (FearringtonDems.org/contact-us). Please register soon to reserve a place; if your plans change, please cancel your registration through the Zoom link. We hope to see you on Tuesday, March 23, at 7:00 pm.

     

     

    Fearrington Genealogy Group

    Fearrington Genealogy GroupTuesday, March 9, 3:00 pm, Zoom Teleconference

    Program details will be emailed to members around March 1. We have been holding Zoom sessions since September and have enjoyed interesting and diverse presentations by our club members. It has been great to be in touch with one another during the past six months.

    Newcomers are welcome. Contact Linda Grimm at 919-533-6296 for details on participating.

     

     

    Fearrington Havurah

    Fearrington HavurahPlease join us for our next Webinar on Tuesday, March 2, at 7 pm when Havurah member Jan Doolin discusses mindfulness and meditation.

    This presentation will focus on what is meditation and the nine forms of meditation, with emphasis on mindfulness meditation. We will briefly explore meditation practices in the five major religions and the many benefits of meditation. Jan has identified six skills for practicing mindfulness, and we will together do short, guided meditations: the “One Breath Meditation” and “The Loving Kindness Meditation.”

    Jan is a retired attorney and is now a registered yoga teacher, teaching yoga, Pilates, and meditation, with 20 years of teaching experience. She teaches privately and conducts meditation classes throughout the year in her home studio. She also offers a weekly meditation circle here in Fearrington and on Zoom.

    To register in advance for this webinar, use the following link:
    https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_MtHlUkzGS_SPgVr_gWWmgQ

     

     

    Fearrington Republican Club

    Fearrington Rep ClubThe Fearrington Republican Club anticipates meeting again when The Gathering Place re-opens, and we are in a safer time. We hope that many have received or are in the queue to receive their vaccines soon.

    In the meantime, the Chatham County Republicans welcome us to their annual CC GOP Convention on March 20. The program includes local speakers and party elections. It is currently planned as a virtual event. Any registered Republican voter can sign up at the website: chathamncgop.com.

     

     

    Fearrington Swim & Croquet Club

    Swim Croquet Club logoSummer will be here soon, and it will be time to start enjoying the Swim & Croquet Club pools and activities! Planning is underway to ensure we have another successful season, taking into consideration county and state regulations and CDC guidelines.

    The opening date for the pools is planned for early May. When this date is finalized and more information is available about any changes in requirements related to protecting against Covid-19, additional information will be provided.

    Residents will be able to join the Club or renew their membership beginning in mid-March. Look for additional information then.

    You can learn more about the Club now by visiting the Swim and Croquet page under the Group Section of the FHA website: www.fearringtofha.org. You may also email questions to fearringtonswimcroquet@gmail.com

     

     

    Fearrington Village Singers

    FVS logoJulie Taymor Presentation
    Thursday, March 25, 4 pm

    Theatre, opera, and film lovers, get ready! Fearrington Village Singers’ own Mike Hardy will feature The World of Julie Taymor: The Lion King, The Magic Flute, Spider-Man, and more. Mike will introduce this massively important theatre director, show her TED talk, and close with a Q & A based on his forty years in the theatre world. Good-bye Rodgers and Hammerstein. Hello Taymor and beyond. One of a number of tradition-breaking and making directors from the past 30 years, Taymor’s distinctive style moved from her experimental work to Broadway, the Metropolitan Opera, and cinema.

    Zoom link available on fearringtonvillagesingers.org homepage.

     

     

    Fearrington Yacht Club

    fyc200Ahoy, Mates! It looks like we may be able to get out of the doldrums of the Covid-19 virus by the fall. On that optimistic note, we should start to plan for a fall trip and the annual FYC meeting/chowder dinner. Please contact Maggie Tunstall if you have ideas, suggestions, or would just like to help to get the Yacht Club up and sailing again. FYC Membership is open to residents of Fearrington Village and Galloway Ridge. NO YACHT REQUIRED! Members who paid dues for 2020 are automatically enrolled for 2021 at no additional cost. For event information and a membership
    form, log onto the FYC page at: https://dev.fearringtonfha.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&layout=blog&id=155&Itemid=1197 

    For general membership questions, contact Treasurer Sally Muncy, 919-619-8817. For club activities, or to volunteer with events, contact Commodore Maggie Tunstall at 919-542-0031.

     

     

    Women of Fearrington

    WOF CMYK OvalCome on a socially distanced road trip on March 11, at 11 am to the studio of Paperhand Puppet Intervention in Saxapahaw to learn how they use puppetry and performance to promote justice, equality, and peace by making merry with myth and memory. Cost of the tour is $20, with optional lunch at Eddy Pub.

    Another road trip will be Wednesday, March 31, at 11 am to Cape Fear Botanical Gardens in Fayetteville, followed by optional lunch at the Garden Café and then an optional extended hike through the Gardens.

    Plan now to join us April 17 for “Paws for a Cause,” a spring stroll with a friend, two-legged or four-legged, to benefit women and children in need in Chatham County.

    Paula De Pano, Beverage Director of Fearrington House Restaurant, will speak at the General Meeting webinar Wednesday, March 17, 1:30 pm.

    Register for any road trips or webinars at WomenOfFearrington.org.

     

     

    Chatham County Agencies

    Chatham Connecting

    Chatham Connecting logoThe season is changing, spring is nearly here, the daffodils are heading, and it is time for fresh starts. Thinking of how to get involved with the wider Chatham Community? This is a good time to check out Chatham Connecting www.chathamconnecting.org, an online resource that lists the volunteer and donation needs of 100+ nonprofit service agencies. The site installed a “Volunteer from Home” button to help locate opportunities during the pandemic. For example, Second Bloom is looking for volunteers with its domestic violence help line; CORA offers opportunities for individuals, youth, and groups to join in the fight against hunger; and the Chatham County Historical Association needs fundraisers. By clicking the Youth Volunteers button, older teens can find opportunities especially for them. Chatham Connecting brings together those in need with those who can help. Why wait?

     


    fcares logo

     


     

     

    Dealing with the Risks of Phone and Computer Fraud, Spam, and Phishing Attacks

    Thursday, March 25, 1:30 pm, via Zoom

    Playing and working in the expanding fast lanes of the internet highways and byways have created many challenges and risks for such travelers and visitors in recent years. Online digital realms offer an enormous range of benefits for those who use computers, cell phones, and internet-based (VoIP) phones. Along with these benefits, using the internet has produced an increasing exposure to ever-more sophisticated hidden risks of threats and thefts of personal information, passwords, financial records, bank account contents, etc. We'll consider some key tips to defend yourself from such high-risk digital threats.

    Jon Darling, Emeritus Professor of Sociology and former Acting Vice-President for Academic Affairs at the University of Pittsburgh, Johnstown, will help us prepare our digital defenses. Jon’s specialties include social psychology, sociology of family, and sociology of community, and he has focused on digital community networking since 1997. After retiring, Jon became a designated Maryland Legacy Leader on Public Policy and worked as a full-time legislative aide for constituent and policy matters in the Maryland General Assembly before moving to Fearrington in 2010. Jon has served the community in many capacities and is currently the Fearrington Cares webmaster.

     

     

    Dealing with Mental Health

    May is Mental Health Month, but we can always use a little early assistance either with or without a pandemic.

    Hope4NC Helpline (855-587-3463)

    Hope4NC connects North Carolinians to mental health resources that help them cope and build resilience during times of crisis. The helpline is staffed 24/7 and provides free and confidential emotional support, counseling referrals, and community resources. As part of the state’s recent hurricane recovery efforts, it served over 4,400 people in the most impacted counties; now it is being made available to everyone in North Carolina’s 100 counties during the Covid-19 crisis. For more information, go to www.ncdhhs.gov/divisions/mental-health-developmental-disabilities-and-substance-abuse/hope4nc.

    NCBAM Hope Line for Older Adults (866-578-4673 or 866-578-HOPE)

    The North Carolina Baptist Aging Ministry’s toll-free statewide Hope Line was established for older adults experiencing isolation. Trained staff and volunteers receive calls daily from 9:00 am to 9:00 pm to encourage callers with a friendly voice and a listening ear. For more information, go to ncbam.org/ministry-outreaches.html.

    Cardinal Innovations Mental Health Crisis Line (800-939-5911)

    Licensed clinicians are available on the Crisis Line 24/7 for anyone looking for services for mental health, substance use, or intellectual and developmental disabilities (www.cardinalinnovations.org/Mental-Health-Crisis-Line). Cardinal Innovations also provides a free and anonymous online mental health screening for anyone to complete. Find it on their website at www.cardinalinnovations.org/Resources/Mental-Health-Screening.

     

     

    Rhythm—Without the Blues: A New ONLINE Movement Class for a Healthy Body

    Friday, March 12, 19, and 26, 11:30 am—12:15 pm via Zoom

    This ONLINE series is designed to help you move with greater ease and less pain. Anyone can join and learn within the safety of his or her own home. Veteran teacher Glenna Batson will guide you through simple, rhythmic movement sequences that you can do sitting or standing—whatever best fits your needs and abilities. Glenna will show how these movements relate to everyday activities, so you can keep a rhythmic liveliness going throughout your day.

    The class builds on sound principles for range of motion, weight shifting, and balance. So, whether your goal is to ‘get moving,’ find freedom of movement, or simply enjoy yourself, you’ll uncover the FUNdamentals of maintaining healthy muscles and joints.

    Glenna Batson, PT, ScD, MA is a former physical therapy professor and dance educator. She believes in the expressive power of mindful movement as a way of keeping the bloom of life going at any age and stage of life. She has lived in Fearrington since 2007.

     

     

    Zoom Movement Classes, Support Groups, and Education Programs Links Are on Our Website www.fearringtoncares.org

    Occasionally Zoom program IDs and passwords will change; if you have saved a link it may eventually become inactive. Use the links on our website for a quick, current connection to all Zoom programs. If you would like to practice a Zoom connection and meeting, email info@fearringtoncares.org and we will set that up. Please note: One-time registration is now required for participation in Classes and Support Groups through May, 2021.

     


     

    Join Movement Classes via Zoom
    www.fearringtoncares.org

    All classes 11:30 am

    No classes after December 18.

    Mondays—Chair Yoga

    Wednesdays—Otago Fall-Prevention Exercises

    Thursdays—Line Dancing is back!

    Fridays—Rhythm—Without the Blues (March 12, 19, 26)

    Join Support Groups via Zoom
    www.fearringtoncares.org

    Caregiver's Support Group:
    Wednesday, March 3 and 17, 12:30–2:00 pm

    Parkinson's Support Group:
    Wednesday,March 10, 3:30–4:30 pm. (New
    members can contact Jan Cope-Kasten
    (jcopekasten@gmail.com) or Karen Metzguer
    (karen@fearringtoncares.org) for information.)

    Living with Chronic Conditions:
    Thursday, March 4 and 18, 11:00 am–12:30pm (new time).

     

    Alcoholics Anonymous Meetings Resume

    The Alcoholics Anonymous Support Group has resumed in-person meetings. Please contact Karen Metzguer (karen@fearringtoncares.org) for information.

     

     

    UPDATE: Donate Over-the-Counter and Prescription Meds 

    Updated March 18, 2021 by Fearrington Cares

    The Chatham Cares Community Pharmacy (CCCP) in Siler City is a great place to donate medical items you no longer want or need. CCCP is a non-profit local organization providing quality pharmacy services to uninsured and underinsured residents of the county. They accept medical equipment that has been cleansed thoroughly or never used by a patient. They also accept supplies of all kinds (anything you can buy at a drugstore or medical supply store) and personal care items (soap, shampoo, lotion, deodorant, waterproof or disposable bed pads, adult underwear, urinals, disposable gloves, compression socks, bed risers, etc.).

    The CCCP accepts unopened OTC (over-the-counter) medications of all kinds. They also accept ALL CURRENT prescription medications (except controlled substances) that are unopened and still sealed. If the medication was dispensed in a blister pack, unused pills that are still in the blister pack are also accepted. Their licensed pharmacists will take your leftovers and add them to others to make a supply for our less-fortunate neighbors in Chatham County. Instead of turning these (sometimes very expensive) items into a pharmacy or the police for destruction, please take them to the CCCP. For office hours and location, go to www.chathamcares.com/1.html or call 919-663-0177.

     

     

    Covid-19 and Vaccine Information

    Fearrington Cares maintains a website with county, state, and national information about the pandemic and the virus: fearringtoncares.org/resources/covid-19-coronavirus-current-information/. Vaccine information is changing frequently, so check the links on the website for the most current information.

    Information on finding an appointment to receive the Covid-19 vaccine can be found at fearringtoncares.org/about-finding-an-appointment-for-the-covid-vaccine. Our site includes phone numbers and web links for several health care providers. Once you are added to their waiting lists, you will be contacted to schedule an appointment as they become available.

    Specific details on the Chatham County Public Health Department (CCPHD) vaccine roll out are online at www.chathamnc.org/services/health/coronavirus/coronavirus-vaccine. You can join CCPHD’s waitlist by clicking the Covid-19 Vaccine Interest Tool in the center of the page. In addition, there is information on free transportation to vaccine appointments, which is provided by Chatham Transit (chathamtransit.org/category/news/).



     

    Fearrington Directory Changes

    Welcome to Our New Residents!

    The following persons have been added to the Fearrington Village Directory between January 15 and February 14:

    NameAddressContact Information
    Jay W. BRILL
    and
    Russell D. DAVIS
    29 Benchmark Jay's Email: jaywbrill@gmail.com
    Russell's Email: russ.davis83@gmail.com
    Jay's Cell: 919-259-2198
    Russell's Cell: 919-360-6994
    Rich COX and
    Jim MAY 
    38 Speyside Circle  Rich's Email: richcox4569@gmail.com
    Jim's Email: mayjim506@gmail.com
    Home: 919-542-3599 
    Lisa M. HALL  5 Matchwood  Lisa's Email: lisk8er@gmail.com
    Lisa's Cell: 415-203-0627 
    David L. (Dave) and Dremea L. HILL  1356 Bradford Place  Dave's Email: dlh25130@aol.com
    Dremea's Email: dremeahill@gmail.com
    Dave's Cell: 304-784-0214
    Dremea's Cell: 304-784-7877 
    Lee KAZANAS
    and
    Michele ZEMBOW
    57 Stone Ledge Lee's Email: kazanas.lee@gmail.com
    Michele's Email: mzembow@gmail.com
    Lee's Cell: 518-524-1323
    Michele's Cell: 973-202-6449
    Betsy and Chester KYLSTRA 730 Spindlewood (626) Betsy's Email: betsy2849@gmail.com
    Chester's Email: chester2849@gmail.com
    Wendell LAWRENCE 42 Benchmark Wendell's Email: wendell.k.lawrence@gmail.com
    Wendell's Cell: 919-620-7639
    Claire J. OLIVER
    Roberta J. (Sara) and
    Steven R. WEXLER
    630 Spindlewood Sara's Email: asarawexler@gmail.com
    Steven's Email: swexler@nc.rr.com
    Sara's Cell: 919-533-0170
    Steven's Cell: 919-533-6234
    Christopher Anders and
    Margaret A. (Maggie) RANGE
    712 Spindlewood (608) Home: magrange@me.com
    Home: 202-363-9860
    Barry and Patricia RUSSINOF 571 Woodbury Home: autobarry@msn.com
    Home: 305-812-5595

     

    Are you a new resident? Be sure to register on our FHA community website. Doing so will give you full access to website features and allow you to be added to our resident directory. Log on to FearringtonFHA.org and on the top menu click on “Directory.” Then, in the drop-down menus click first on “New Resident” then “List Me in the Directory.”

    Are you an existing resident whose contact information has changed? Don’t forget to update your listing on the FearringtonFHA.org web site. On the landing page, click on the Directory tab on the top menu and then on Update Preferences on the drop-down menu. When you update your contact information online, the updates will be included in the FHA Directory & Handbook printed in January each year. Stay in touch with your fellow residents by keeping your contact information current.

     

     

     

    Calendar for March 2021

    Fearrington Village clubs and groups will be meeting on these dates. Events are usually held at The Gathering Place unless stated otherwise. However, The Gathering Place is currently closed due to Covid-19 restrictions. Therefore, if you have questions, be sure to check with the person or web page listed in the “Contact” column for the most up-to-date information.

     

    Day/Date/TimeOrganizationEventContact
    Tuesday
    March 2
    7 pm 
    Havurah  Zoom Webinar  Beryl Sherman
    919-704-8018 
    Thursday
    March 9
    3 pm 
    Genealogy Group  Zoom Teleconference  Linda Grimm
    919-533-6296 
    Tuesday
    March 11
    11 am 
    Women of Fearrington  Trip to
    Paperhand Puppets 
    Mif Flaharty
    (808) 234-0008 
    Friday
    March 12
    9:30 am 
    Bulls & Bear Investment Club  Club Meeting
    via Zoom 
    Anna Shearer
    703-217-0322
    ashearer1219@gmail.com 
    Wednesday
    March 17
    7 pm 
    Women of Fearrington Webinar:
    Beverage Director,
    Fearrington House Restaurant
    Tracy Bailey
    (302) 561-1298
    Tuesday
    March 23
    1:30 pm 
    Fearrington Democratic Club  Zoom Mtg Speaker:
    NC Senator
    Jeff Jackson 
    Vickie Shea
    919-545-0024
    Wednesday
    March 31
    11 am
    Women of Fearrington Trip to Cape Fear
    Botanical Garden
    Mif Flaharty
    (808) 234-0008
    Coming in April: 
     

     
    Saturday
    April 17
    9 am to 12 noon
    (Rain date April 24) 
    Women of Fearrington  Paws for a Cause  Barbara Gilbert
    (919) 533-6597 

     

     

     
  • FHA Newsletter, October 2020

    fearrington NL logo

    HOMEOWNERS’  ASSOCIATION  NEWSLETTER
    October 2020      Volume 39      Number 9

     Contest header

    See "From the Editors," below.

     

    Contents

     

     

    President's Message

     

    The Road Ahead

    I keep thinking, “It’s still summer isn’t it?” but I keep hearing voices around me saying, “We have a lot to do to prepare for year-end and 2021. Get busy!” That keeps my mind focused on the decisions our FHA faces on the road to the new year.

    There indeed are some critical matters ahead of us, including planning an annual meeting in the time of covid, electing board members, and creating a plan for Beechmast Pond. These issues are addressed by other articles in this edition of our newsletter.

    One critical decision is what management company to employ at the end of November, when our contract with the current company, Towne Properties, ends. The Board has conducted an exhaustive bidding process among multiple management companies, including Towne Properties, hoping to both improve services and restrain costs. This process is a partnership between our FHA Board and the leadership of those service groups that are also considering such a change. If a new company is selected, it will take a short-term effort for us all to learn how to work with them and how best to access the information we need. After that learning process, we believe it will be much easier for us all to access information and get the answers we need.

    FHA is also moving forward in its goal of assuming responsibility for maintaining as many of our village walking paths and trails as possible. This is also a partnership with the various service groups, as well as with Fitch Creations. Jesse Fearrington, our Director of Grounds and Landscaping, is leading this effort to improve the quality of those paths and trails. He is assisted by a committee from the various service groups. We believe that we can assure consistent quality, while restraining overall costs, by employing vendors eager for larger projects.

    In each case we are looking at ways to preserve and improve the life we enjoy in Fearrington Village. But it will take work and money to accomplish this. We have a very proactive FHA Board and many wonderful volunteers, but we will need to make decisions about how to invest our limited resources. Some things require services that our board and volunteers cannot provide, such as engineering, construction, landscaping, and legal services, and they can be expensive.

    Keeping everyone informed under the conditions of the new reality imposed by covid-19 is another challenge, which relates to all of the above. We will have to rely not only on written communications, but on formats such as webinars, the way we did in our last open meeting. Fortunately, we have a communications team which has proven successful in not only adapting to that environment but in innovating to fit our needs.

    All of us are joined in traveling that road ahead into 2021. As we look into the future, a community survey now being conducted by our Long-Range Planning Committee will help us more fully understand what you, the members of our community, want for the future.

    “Nothing behind me, everything ahead of me as is ever so on the road.”  Jack Kerouac

     

     

    Our Fearrington Homeowners’
    Association Newsletter

    The Newsletter is the official publication of our Fearrington Homeowners’ Association (FHA), produced by and for residents of Fearrington Village in Pittsboro, NC. The Newsletter contains community news, reports from FHA Board members, items of interest to residents, and announcements of club and neighborhood activities.

    The Newsletter is published electronically eleven times a year (July/August is a combined issue). A PDF copy of the current issue can be found on the FHA website: fearringtonfha.org.

    Submissions:

    Content deadlines are the 15th of the previous month. Send submissions to: editors@fearringtonfha.org. All persons submitting content will receive a confirmation email.

    Do you have content for an upcoming newsletter? Email us at the above address and we will send you the "Newsletter Guidelines" and "Style Sheet".

    Newsletter Staff:
    Jan Kowal Ann Melchior
    Leslie Palmer Deborah Repplier
    Jackie Walters  
    Printing and Distribution:
    Carol Kurtz Barbara Amago
    Fearrington Homeowners’ Association
    Board Members

    Our Fearrington Homeowners’ Association (FHA) is a volunteer, non-profit organization dedicated to the health, safety, and welfare of residents. In addition to fostering resident participation, the Board is responsible for maintenance of common property and covenant enforcement. For additional details, including job descriptions, click on the “FHA” tab on the FHA webpage (fearringtonfha.org).

    Officers  
    President: Carl Angel
    Vice President: Rose Krasnow
    Secretary: Leslee Shell
    Treasurer: Tony Daniels
    Directors  
    Communications: Gordon Pitz
    Community Affairs: Margaret (Maggie) Tunstall
    Covenants: Eric Frank
    Grounds and Landscaping: Jesse Fearrington
    Health, Safety and Security: Warren Ort
    Infrastructure and Facilities: Mark Haslam

     

     

    Hello my name is

     

    From the Editors

    Help Us Name Our Newsletter

    Did you know the Fearrington newsletter was first published in 1977 as a quarterly by Fitch Creations? Then, in June 1981, the FHA Board, with Steve Metelits and Yvonne Weimer as the first editors, began publishing the Newsletter on a bi-monthly basis. This bit of history reminds us just how long our newsletter has been a part of the pulse of Fearrington Village.

    In the September 2020 issue, we told you that we are seeking ways to improve the look and production of the Newsletter. We think a new name should be a part of that refresh.

    And we are inviting you, our readers, to help us.

    So, put on your thinking caps. Send us your idea(s) for what Fearrington Village should call its monthly that brings you the news you need and want. Our staff will narrow the field and return in a few months for a community vote. The resident with the winning name will receive bragging rights and, with their permission, be featured in an upcoming issue.

    The deadline to submit is midnight, October 31, 2020. Submit your suggested names (up to three per resident) in an email to: editors@fearringtonfha.org. In the email’s subject line write: My Idea to Name the Newsletter. In the email’s body, include your suggested name idea(s), as well as your own name, address, email, and phone number. All submissions will be acknowledged, so please resend if you don’t get an acknowledgement within 48 hours.

     

    Wanted: Feature Topics and/or Writers

    Make Your Voice Heard

    Things have been fairly quiet recently due to the Coronavirus, but activity has been going on quietly behind the scenes. Some of the Hospitality Office volunteers have been preparing Newcomer packets and the area and block contacts have been continuing to deliver them to new residents. Any contacts who need packets for new neighbors can request them by emailing community@fhaboard.org to make arrangements for pickup.

    We’ve created a form to help you submit your ideas. Simply go to the FHA web site (fearringtonfha.org) and click on the Newsletter tab. There you will find the “Feature Article Request Form” and “Guidance for Feature Submissions.” Other useful information is posted there as well, such as “The Newsletter Guidelines” and “The Newsletter Style Sheet.”

    As you can see from Betty King’s feature this month, we also publish poetry and photography. Topics for all articles should be of interest to a broad section of Fearrington and Galloway readers.

     


     

     

    From Our FHA Board

    News Items

     

     

    Community Assessment Survey Update

    When each of us purchased or leased our homes in Fearrington Village, we bought into the Village vision with the fields, silo, cows, goats, large tree canopy, and common areas with streams and walking paths. We bought into that ideal by investing with the single largest contribution a family can make—buying a home. Since its beginning in 1976, the Village has grown from a dozen homes to over 1300. Now our infrastructure is aging and parts need remediation. New arrivals, as our population changes, bring forth new considerations.

    Our FHA Board has tasked the Long-Range Planning Committee (LRPC), through its Lifestyle Subcommittee and other professionals, to develop the forthcoming Village Community Assessment Survey. The journey includes interpreting the results, sharing them with you, and going forward, working together on the findings.

    Any and all results depend on your involvement and participation in the survey. There will probably be some surprises, and some solutions will be difficult to achieve or take longer to implement. Some may require the participation of other decision makers in the Village community and continued homeowner input. In reality, some issues may not be resolvable at the present time due to ownership, covenant authority, or funding constraints.

    The first step in solving any problem is identifying it. Our FHA Board intends to work with you and other entities to solve or lessen the impact of your concerns and redirect resources that are available. It will need your continued support and acceptance of common responsibility and resources so that our Village will retain its attractiveness and bucolic lifestyle for years to come.

    Next Steps:

    1. Early November: Expect the survey to be distributed to most residents via email. Those of you without email access will have a hard copy delivered.
    2. Early December: Deadline for responding to the survey, either electronically or by delivering hardcopies to The Gathering Place Survey Response Box.
    3. January 2021: Sharing the results with the community and deciding on the path forward.

    A heartfelt thank you from your LRPC Lifestyle Subcommittee.

     

     

    Beechmast Pond Presentation

    As you might remember, in the spring of this year our FHA Board decided to conduct a study of the Beechmast Pond. This study was necessary due to the amount of money that our FHA spends each year dredging the pond. The Board wanted to see if the dredging was having the anticipated impact and if there might be more cost-effective solutions other than dredging the pond on an annual basis. On September 8, our FHA Board, together with some residents who would be most directly affected by changes, attended a presentation by Kris Bass Engineering on the results of the Beechmast Pond study.

    During the presentation, our Board learned that our dredging activities were insufficient to maintain the pond as a water control device. The goal for a water control device is that the dam overflow would only occur after a 25-year rainfall. However, the study indicated that a 5-year rainfall would trigger the dam overflow. This is caused by the fact that the pond is now only about 5 feet deep, where it should be 15 feet deep or more. Our Board also learned that there are some potential risks that could have significant financial impacts on our community if we continue with our current approach to maintaining the pond.

    Kris Bass Engineering presented several alternatives, or “Concepts”. They offered photographs of other projects, similar to those proposed for Beechmast Pond, which provide examples of the end results. The numbers on the photographs correspond to the Concept numbers.

    • Concept 1. Dig a larger forebay to capture the sediment runoff. The result would leave the pond having an appearance very similar to what one sees now.
    • Concept 2. Create a wetlands environment, with a forebay, to replace the pond. The result would be a network of interconnected small ponds surrounded by wetlands vegetation.
    • Concept 3. Restore the pond to its original state of a stream where water and sediment would freely flow downstream. The stream banks would be designed to minimize erosion, and natural vegetation would be planted along the banks.
    Pitz Concept 12 web
     

    For more information, you can view the slides from the presentation of the alternatives, which are on our FHA website. The slides summarize the problems the engineers saw with the present layout, the three alternatives they considered, and a summary of their conclusions and recommendations

    The Board plans to present more details on this study to the community, along with financial impacts. The community will decide which solution is best for us. There is no defined time-frame for when this decision will take place, but most likely it will be next year.

    Photos provided by Kris Bass Engineering.

    Pitz Concept 3 web
     

     

     

    getinvolved larger 2 orig

    Volunteers Corner

    Things have been fairly quiet recently due to the Coronavirus, but activity has been going on quietly behind the scenes. Some of the Hospitality Office volunteers have been preparing Newcomer packets and the area and block contacts have been continuing to deliver them to new residents. Any contacts who need packets for new neighbors can request them by emailing community@fhaboard.org to make arrangements for pickup.

    Our Nominating Committee has been busy putting together a slate of candidates for election to our 2021 FHA Board. Watch for their bios and a sample ballot. Even though candidates have been identified for all the open positions, you can still volunteer or nominate someone else for consideration. For details, contact simtho.fv@gmail.com.

    Our Covenants Committee needs volunteers to help with the many requests for approvals of exterior home improvement projects and tree removals and to evaluate the occasional covenants complaint. This is an important FHA function which helps to maintain property values in Fearrington. Contact covenants@fhaboard.org for more information.

     

     

    Our 2021 FHA Election Process

    By Leslee Shell, FHA Secretary

    Our FHA Board members are adapting the 2021 election process to a Village environment altered by COVID-19. Changes include an annual meeting (November 15th) that will take place via Zoom instead of in-person at Galloway Ridge. Last year, votes were accepted at the meeting place and on the meeting date. This year ballots will need to be returned by November 13th so they may be counted and results announced at the Annual Meeting. Finally, residents will need to return ballots, perhaps a little more awkwardly, by depositing them outside of The Gathering Place or mailing them there.

    Our FHA Board first checked on the price to mail ballots to residents and received an estimate of $1,749.92. Therefore, we decided that the best alternative was to deliver a printed ballot (to avoid having residents print their own ballot) and that it could be best be distributed by block contacts. We will send out a letter to the contacts soon asking for their help. As in previous years, one vote per lot owner and address is allowed. We will distribute the final ballot during the last week of October so that votes may be returned to the Gathering Place by November 13th.

    Our Board has posted a sample ballot and the biographies of the candidates online. The candidate biographies are also given below. We encourage residents to add names to the ballot. According to our bylaws, this may be done by getting the approval of a candidate and having 20 residents sign a petition for nomination. These must be received by October 15th so that a final ballot may be created and distributed during that last week in October.

    Our FHA Board supports the candidates listed on the ballot and believes they will make good additions to our Board. Your vote is important! Please vote so we may obtain a quorum and add these volunteer candidates to our vacant positions on the Board and the Nominating Committee.

    Candidate Biographies

    Each candidate would serve a two-year term.

    Bio for John (Chris) Jaeger, Candidate for FHA Director, Community Affairs
    Originally from Ohio, I moved to Henderson NC and spent 44 years there building a successful Optometric practice. Retired to Fearrington in fall of 2019. I have been president of the Royale Palms Home Owners Association in Myrtle Beach since 2007 and have been on the board of the Windermere by the Sea HOA in the past. My wife and I have 3 daughters who graduated from UNC and six grandchildren, none of whom live east of the Mississippi River. I enjoy gardening, woodworking, walking my dogs, cooking and electric bike riding with my wife, Donna. We enjoyed extensive traveling, including camping, until covid-19 slowed us down. We are looking forward to an active life with our new friends in Fearrington.

    Bio for Chris Kaman, Candidate for the FHA Nominating Committee
    Chris Kaman is a retired Database Administrator. He worked for UNC at Chapel Hill for 25 years. He and his wife, Jane, have lived in Fearrington for 6 years. They have lived in Chatham County since 1981 when they were married. Their two daughters are adults, one living south of Asheville, and the other in Santa Clara, California. Chris enjoys geeky stuff, walking, cooking, and napping. Jane enjoys finishing quilts on her long arm quilting machine.

    Bio for Leslee Shell, Candidate for FHA Secretary
    My husband and I moved to Fearrington Village from Durango, Colorado one year ago. We love being surrounded by accomplished and well-educated neighbors here in FV. When I retired from my tenured position as a health sciences librarian at Arizona State University in 2012, I continued teaching for ASU in their online College of Nursing program. Eventually I returned to work fulltime as a library director in Colorado. In all, I spent 41 years working in academic, medical, hospital, and public libraries. In Fearrington Village, I filled a vacancy on our FHA Board and have enjoyed having a “job” as my activities in FV came to a sudden halt. We look forward to stepping back into the club activities of this lively community soon.

     

     

    3-IN-1 SHREDDING EVENT

    recycle logo

    Saturday, October 17

    9-12 AM

    The Gathering Place Parking Lot

    Shred Documents

    Dispose of Prescription Drugs

    Have Fire Extinguishers Checked

    MASKS REQUIRED DURING EVENT

    Sponsored by Fearrington Green Scene

     

     

    The Gathering Place: Partial Reopening of FHA Office

    Our FHA Board has discussed again the possibility of partially re-opening The Gathering Place. Our Board is concerned about balancing convenience and safety, and protecting residents, volunteers, and others who might be involved. The Board believes that the current situation still does not warrant any major changes.

    Nevertheless, we hope to take some small steps. For residents who need access to certain services such as printing, or to documents such as directories, or who have questions that could be answered by a member of the office staff, the office will be open on a limited basis. You can make an appointment to see a member of the office staff three mornings a week, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, from 9 am to noon, beginning Monday, October 5.

    It will be necessary to make an appointment with a member of our staff by sending an email to office@fearingtonfha.org. Please make appointments at least 48 hours ahead of the time you would like to meet.

    At your appointment time, you will need to go to the FHA Office entrance at the back of The Gathering Place across from the Fearrington Cares building. You will need to wear a mask and maintain a safe distance from staff members.

    We shall reevaluate the situation from time to time, and decisions about further changes will depend on the Governor's executive orders.

    We understand that some would prefer a more liberal policy, but since the majority of residents belong to a very vulnerable population, we cannot afford to take further risks. Please remember that our office staff are going out of their way to be helpful, and they deserve our support and cooperation.

      


     

    Features

     

     

    My Secret Garden

    Poetry and Photography by Betty King

     

    My Secret Garden is no secret, you know,
    Both flora and fauna I’m wanting to show.

    Many treasures are small, so look closely I say,
    Some show their beauty in a very big way.

     

    garden 1

     

    Looking at a leaf, what did I see?
    A swallowtail caterpillar looking at me. 

     

     

    garden 2

     

    Pendants dangling from this ornamental grass
    Make river oats a plant with outstanding class.

     

    garden 3

     

    I love these little natives, often found under trees,
    Trilliums they’re called because their parts are in threes.

     

     

    garden 4

     

    Talk about weird, this goes to the edge,
    The distinctive flower of a common sedge.

     

     

    garden 5

     

    Hostas are lovely, they’re always a good bet,
    But a closer look makes them even better yet.

     

     

    garden 6

     

    An early spring wildling, this bloodroot you see,
    A more beautiful flower there never will be.

     

    garden 7

     

     

    This place I call garden is mine for keeps,
    For in the midst of my ferns, a baby deer sleeps.

     

     

     

    A Walk in an English-Inspired Garden

    By Larry Newlin, lwnewlin@gmail.com

    In the spring of 2019, as my wife, Lee, and I considered moving to Fearrington Village, we walked for the first time the circuit path in the Jenny Fitch Memorial Park. We had participated in the Farmers Market since 2011 selling organic produce from our Peaceful River Farm on the Haw, but this was to be a new chapter. As we meandered around the ponds and took in the beauty of the hardy plants and trees in bud and bloom, we appreciated that Fearrington had been patterned after the quaint villages and beautiful countryside of England.

    Stourhead 1

    Stourhead in Wiltshire, England.
    Photo by Lee Newlin

    Jenny's Park, sometimes referred to as Camden Park, was developed by her husband, R. B. Fitch, with the design expertise of her good friend, Chip Callaway. Chip is a friend of ours as well, and, like Chip, we led garden tours to England. I posed the question to Chip about his inspiration for the design:

    "I designed that garden, with RB’s blessing, to feature Jenny’s favorite trees and shrubs. It was a barren pasture without the stream we created. We wanted to get some shade out there before we could plant many of her favorites including hydrangeas and viburnums.... My love of Olmsted and Brown and Henry Hoare at Stourhead must have been in the back of my mind as I drew these gardens, but Jenny was the real inspiration. RB’s love and support were constant."

    Waterfall PGHydrangea 4

    Jenny's Park.
    Photo by Lee Newlin

    The "Brown" Chip references is Lancelot "Capability" Brown who would ride the future circuit carriage/strolling path of a wealthy landowner's property and conclude, "This property has great capability." As England's most influential landscape gardener, Brown’s 250 commissions in the mid-18th century were simple designs with sweeping lawns, serpentine lakes, and groves of trees. If you have ever viewed the series Downton Abbey, then you have seen a Capability Brown landscape.

    Lower Pond JoePyeWeed 3

    Lower Pond. Photo by Lee Newlin

    Like Brown, Henry Hoare wanted to imitate nature in the design of his property, known as Stourhead. Hoare wanted his new garden to be awe-inspiring to visitors and to champion the ideals and splendor of Augustan Rome. Classical temples punctuated the hillsides overlooking the idyllic lake. Later, Richard Colt Hoare, Henry’s grandson, would oversee the planting of thousands of trees and hardy plants primarily imported from America, and complete the path around the lake. Without the classical buildings, this style would be described as "picturesque,” and it influenced artists, poets, and musicians during the emerging Romantic Period. Today, Stourhead is regarded as one of the great gardens of the world.

    Frederick Law Olmsted, who designed Central Park, the US Capitol Grounds, and the grounds at the Biltmore estate, drew inspiration from visiting English parks and country gardens. Olmsted disliked straight lines and loved trees. He believed parks should make nature accessible to everyone and promote a sense of community. He strived to create a sense of childlike awe and curiosity of his natural and walkable art.

    Whether you are ambling in Central Park, Stourhead, or Jenny's Park, you will sense a "genius of the place," a phrase coined by Alexander Pope, meaning a pastoral mirroring of Nature.

    The aim of such parks is to provide serenity and stimulate creative thought—thus, like a poem, an artistic masterpiece, or a symphony, one is unknowingly transposed. The hustle and bustle of daily life is left behind, and a more creative and authentic sense of living can be experienced. The walk around the park invites curiosity—a path meandering around a mature tree exposes a view of a green and glistening lawn or a babbling brook leading to the still pond.

    Waterfall PGHydrangea 4

    Hydrangea Framed Waterfall.
    Photo by Lee Newlin

    At Jenny's Park, laminated poems hang from the Rainbow Bridge's arm rail, inspiring pause. On a summer morning, there is an abundance of brilliant white panicles on either side of the stream from plantings of "PeeGee" Hydrangeas (Hydrangea Paniculata Grandiflora)

    The park is arboretum-like with a broad array of both familiar and hard-to-find cultivars of shrubs and trees: stately shade trees like oak and maple; flowering trees like dogwood, redbud, chaste tree, and ornamental cherry; trees with exfoliating bark like birch, sycamore, and crepe myrtle; and evergreens like holly, pine, Cryptomeria, live oak, and cedar. There are also more unusual trees like tupelo, Chinese fringe tree, ginkgo, Princess tree, Kentucky yellowwood, and bald cypress. It is a park for all seasons.

    Longtime Fearrington resident, Guy B. Baird, who recently passed away, volunteered for many years with his wife Ingrid to help maintain the park's beauty. He leaves us with a wonderful gift: a guide to The Trees in Camden Park.

    The beautiful flower gardens and mixed borders of the Village Center were undoubtedly inspired by great British gardeners with planterly instincts like Gertrude Jekyll, Christopher Lloyd, Vita Sackville-West, Rosemary Verey, Beth Chatto, and Penelope Hobhouse. The late Rosemary Verey, who hosted a popular BBC garden program, was one of the English landscape gardeners who addressed Jenny Fitch's garden symposia at Fearrington. The American-English symbiotic garden heritage counts Fearrington Village as one of its newest chapters in this enduring and endearing narrative.

    Majestic White Oak 5 web

    Majestic White Oak. Photo by Lee Newlin

    These days in particular, while other public gardens nearby have been closed, Jenny’s Park undergirds the community spirit that permeates the Village. Next time you meander through the park, consider Alexander Pope's reflections on the 18th-century English landscape parks:

    Consult the genius of the place in all;

    That tells the waters or to rise, or fall;

    Or helps th' ambitious hill the heav'ns to scale,

    Or scoops in circling theatres the vale;

    Calls in the country, catches opening glades,

    Joins willing woods, and varies shades from shades,

    Now breaks, or now directs, th' intending lines;

    Paints as you plant, and, as you work, designs.

    As new residents of Fearrington Village, we feel fortunate to have a stellar park in the center of our daily activities.

     

     

    Coping with Adversity

    By Gordon Pitz

    three deer

    Deer outside the front door.
    Photo by Gordon Pitz

    Who can fail to be inspired by a story of triumph over handicap? An unusual tale of this kind can be seen from time to time in Fearrington, most often in the open areas east of the Village Center and south of Village Way.

    These days deer are common in the village, sometimes even in one’s front yard. For many of us they are a cheering sight, even if they are rather too fond of the plantings or a hazard to traffic.

    Pitz Mother and fawn web

    Mother and fawn. Photo by Gordon Pitz

    If you are observant, you may have seen one deer that on first sight appears a little odd. Look closer, and you notice she has only three legs. For at least three years, this majestic creature has been seen in the village from time to time. Recently, I was delighted to encounter her on Weathersfield with a fawn in attendance. While I didn’t notice at the time, she actually has two!

    Daniels Three deer eleven legs web

    Three deer, eleven legs.
    Photo by Tony Daniels

    No one seems to know how she lost her front right leg. I have never had a chance to examine her closely, but it looks like a clean break at or below what would be her shoulder. Was it a birth defect? An unfortunate interaction with a motor vehicle? Or an attack by a predator and the miraculous work of a local vet?

    Fearrington is probably as safe as any habitat for a deer. Even so, she must encounter predators from time to time: coyotes, stray dogs, the bobcat recently seen near Briar Chapel, even hunters, not to mention occasional fast traffic on the roads. Nevertheless, “Tripod,” as I call her, manages to avoid all of them now, and observers say she is not noticeably slower or any less agile than others in the herd.

    So, when I start feeling sorry for myself, I think of Tripod. She has managed to live a normal and, as far as I know, fulfilling life for a deer. We should all be so lucky!

     


     

    Announcements

    Fearrington Groups and Organizations

     

    Fearrington Groups and Organizations

     


    Bulls Bears

    Fearrington Bulls & Bears

    The Fearrington Bulls & Bears is a group of Fearrington residents who are interested in improving their investment knowledge and capability. We meet monthly during non-summer months and communicate even more regularly through an email exchange group to share information, insights, and ideas about investing.

    Guests are welcome to participate in a group meeting or in an email exchange group to gauge their interest in joining the club. The next club meeting will be held by Zoom (due to COVID-19) on October 9, 2020 at 9:30 am

    For more information about the club, the meetings, or the exchange, please contact:

     

     

    Fearrington Dem Club Sm

    Fearrington Democratic Club

    The Fearrington Democratic Club, like the rest of the nation, will be waiting eagerly for election results in mid-November when all votes have been counted and the official certification of results occurs. Early Voting begins on October 15th; the closest location to Fearrington is the Health Sciences building off 15-501 between Andrews Store Road and Briar Chapel. Hours: 8 am - 7:30 pm weekdays, 8 am - 3 pm Saturdays, 12 pm - 3 pm Sundays. Same-day registration and voting for new county registrants who have lived here for at least 30 days is available during Early Voting—bring proof of residential address. To check the status of your absentee ballot: https://northcarolina.ballottrax.net/voter/. Complete information about election procedures and Democratic candidates can be found on the club’s website: http://www.fearringtondems.org/.

     

     

    Fearrington Garden Club logo

    Fearrington Garden Club

    Happily, it is time to begin thinking about the holidays, and the Fearrington Garden Club’s annual poinsettia sale is on! All proceeds from this sale go directly to the Horticultural Program at Chatham Central High School, which grows the poinsettias. The program always brings us lush, beautiful plants in red, white, and pink. Complete with wrapping and a bow, they are a tremendous bargain at only $15. 

    We will be taking orders in October, with pickup on December 8. All plants must be preordered and prepaid this year. Plants will be placed in cars at a designated Fearrington location that we'll email to those who order.

    Order forms are available in the mail kiosks, at the Garden Club page on our FHA website, or by contacting Marilyn Boyle (maboyle17e@gmail.com). Please deposit your order form and check in the Garden Club box in the Swim & Croquet kiosk. Thanks for your support!

     

     

    Fearrington Genealogy GroupFearrington Genealogy Group

    Tuesday, October 13 at 3:00 pm Zoom Teleconference. Details will be emailed to members early in October.

    New members are welcome. Contact Linda Grimm at 919-533-6296.

     

     

    greenscenebanner2Fearrington Green Scene

    We are all inescapably aware of the two major environmental issues ravaging our country this year: covid-19 and West Coast Wildfires.  

    Within our community, your FHA and fellow Green Scene members, through our FHA Waste Water Management Task Force, are working on the issue of our aging sewage treatment plant, and possibilities for getting our community back in compliance with current wastewater treatment standards. While all this is going on, each of us has an opportunity to improve our own personal "environment" by considering participating in the Saturday, October 17 "3-in-1" event at The Gathering Place. Described in greater detail elsewhere in this Newsletter, this is an opportunity to shred no longer needed personal papers, dispose of unneeded pharmaceuticals, and "check out" the status of your home fire extinguishers. Hope to see you there!

    —Jason Welsch (914-806-4852 Cell Phone)
    Moderator, Fearrington Green Scene

     

     

    Fearrington HavurahFearrington Havurah

    Fearrington Havurah invites all residents to join us for a Zoom webinar on Tuesday, October 13, at 7 pm. Speakers will be Ari Gauss, Executive Director of NC Hillel, and Hannah Spinrad, Campus Director, UNC- Chapel Hill; their topic is Delivering the Jewish Future in Turbulent Times: How NC Hillel Navigates COVID-19, Anti-Semitism, and Anti-Zionism to Empower and Inspire Jewish College Students.

    Today's Jewish college students live at the nexus of a disconcerting contradiction. Jews are more broadly accepted and admired than ever before in American history. At the same time, there has been an increase in anti-Semitic incidents on college campuses. And young American Jews have never had weaker ties to Israel and the Jewish people. With COVID-19 turning college students' worlds upside down, the challenge has become that much more acute.

    To register or for more information about Fearrington Havurah, fearringtonhavurah@gmail.com. There is a non-member fee of $5.

     

     

    Fearrington Rep ClubFearrington Republican Club

    While in these unusual times, the Fearrington Republican Club will not hold meetings at The Gathering Place. However, we are not silent!  Please find copies of the "2020 Election Dates to Remember" in a manila envelope at the Kiosks. If you would like to be on our mailing list, please drop a note to frc-nc@hotmail.com.

    Candidate materials and hats are available at the Chatham County GOP HQ on 15-501(Sanford Road) Pittsboro. Volunteers are needed for early voting sites (October 15-31) and election day polls. See https://www.chathamncgop.com for updated information and the opportunity to participate in this important election. 

    Questions: contact Donna Stewart, stewart859@att.net.

     

     

    Fearrington Swim & Croquet ClubSwim Croquet Club logo

    Check out these changes that were made this year due to the pandemic:

    The 2020 closing date was extended to 10/4 in response to member requests. Late season hours beginning 9/14, are 12 noon - 6 pm. The pool will close at 3 pm for cleaning and reopen at 3:30 pm.  

    If you didn’t rejoin the pool this year, but are considering rejoining next year, pay a $25 holding fee by 10/31.  The cost is $100 if you wait.

    This fall, members may invite non-member Fearrington residents to join them for a socially distanced game of croquet during October and November. Our Croquet covid Guidelines are posted at the pool and on the FHA website. Please review the guidelines before playing.

    Weather permitting, the court will be open Sundays in October at 4 pm for anyone wanting to give croquet a try. It’s a great way to get outdoors and have some fun.

    A big thanks to all our members for your patience as we make our way through this challenging year.

     

     

    FVS logoFearrington Village Singers: Zoom Session on Collecting Jazz Music

    Fearrington's own Tom Skipper is a long-time, serious (fanatical?) collector of vinyl LPs, particularly jazz music from the 1950s, 60s, and 70s. His collection numbers more than 7,500 records, and while it includes a variety of different musical styles, the majority of his LPs are of jazz music. In this Zoom session, Tom will discuss the history of recorded jazz in America and talk about some of his adventures scouring the globe in search of jazz LPs over the last decades and rubbing shoulders with a few jazz legends along the way. The Zoom session will take place on Thursday, October 22 from 4:00-5:00 pm. Find the Zoom link on the FearringtonVillageSingers.org website.

     

     

    Fearrington Yacht Clubfyc200

    Ahoy, Mates! In view of the continuing health safety issues connected to the Coronavirus, no events are scheduled for the fall. We are hopeful that a vaccine may make it possible to schedule some events in the spring. Membership is open to residents of Fearrington Village and Galloway Ridge. NO YACHT REQUIRED! For event information and membership form, log onto the FYC page at: https://group.fearringtonfha.org?yacht. For general membership questions, contact Treasurer Sally Muncy, 919-619-8817. For cruise information, contact Doug Ashby at 401-954-7680. For club activities or to volunteer with events, contact Commodore Maggie Tunstall at 919-542-0031.

     

     

    WOF CMYK OvalWomen of Fearrington

    WoF’s Wonderful Options Fund dedicates all donations to helping the women and children of Chatham County through grants to local non-profits. The pandemic has greatly increased needs!  www.womenoffearrington.org/fundraising/wonderful-options.

    Did you know that every child removed from the parental home must be assigned a Guardian ad Litem? The October 21 General Meeting is at 1:30 pm via Webinar. Nichole Roman, GAL District Administrator, will explain how this vital program provides for the needs of NC’s children.

    Come on an outdoor tour of M&M Alpaca Farm on October 23 at 10 am to learn more about raising these cuddly creatures. Fee: $5. Optional lunch: Small B&B Café.

    Registration for both events will be on our website for non-members.

    Our Welcome Coffees are the perfect way to meet others in the community! Please email Jo Anne Rosenfeld or Barbara Fearrington.

    Good news! Our annual Holiday Bakery and Market will be December 8.

     

     

    Chatham County Agencies

    Chatham ConnectingChatham Connecting logo

    Chatham Connecting, chathamconnecting.org, lists over 120 non-profits and government agencies in Chatham County that need your support for our neighbors who continue to struggle as a result of the pandemic and financial downturn. While in-person volunteer possibilities are limited by COVID-19 restrictions, donations are welcome. There are lots of ways to help, depending on your interest. For example: CORA and Chatham County Schools seek to feed all students this school year. This effort needs volunteers and you can register your interest at www.corafoodpantry.org. Donations are needed by educational non-profits such as Chatham Literacy, Communities in Schools, and The Learning Trail. The Chatham County Council on Aging seeks activity books and other supplies for seniors sheltering in place during the pandemic; large print crosswords and word searches are especially helpful. The Chatham Historical Association, musuem@chathamhistory.org, seeks volunteers to prepare historical documents and pictures for digitalization in the State archives. Work on this program can be done with masks and social distancing. Check our website for information about the non-profit of your choice to learn more. We connect those who need help with those who can help.

     

     

    Salvation Army 2Salvation Army Holiday Kettle Drive

    For over 35 years, the residents of Fearrington and Galloway Ridge have rung the bell for the Salvation Army. In the last three years, we have collected over $20,000 a year from both Lowe’s Food Store and Harris Teeter. All of those collections stayed here in Chatham County.

    But 2020 has been a different year, thanks to covid-19. Based on the threats of the virus and our aging population of bell ringers, the decision has been made not to ring the bell this year. Hopefully, things will be better in 2021.

    Unfortunately, Salvation Army clients still need help more than ever this year. If you would like to make a donation, please send it to: Salvation Army, PO Box 752, Pittsboro, NC 27312.

    If you have any questions, call Bob Holton @ 919-545-0810.

     

     


    fcares logo

    This Month's Announcements

     

     

    What’s New in the Field of Arthritis Treatment

    Thursday, October 8, 2020, 7:00 pm via Zoom

    Osteoarthritis is the number one cause of disability in the US and tends to occur more frequently as people age. Dr. Lauren Porras is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Sports Medicine in the Department of Orthopedics and the Department of Family Medicine at the University of North Carolina. She specializes in non-operative treatment of joint arthritis, particularly of the knees, hips, shoulders, and hands. This presentation will discuss different treatments for arthritis including bracing, medications, cortisone injections, and hyaluronic acid injections. Dr. Porras will also discuss new regenerative approaches for osteoarthritis including platelet-rich plasma (PRP), amnion-derived fluid, and various stem cell treatments.

     

     

    Five Ways to Create and Nurture Friendships—Even at a Distance

    Wednesday, October 14, 2:00 pm via Zoom

    Need a booster shot of well-being and connection? Join us each month this fall to gain fresh perspective and polish up a trove of down-to-earth tools to help build stress-resistance during these challenging times. Each hour-long Zoom session is led by Vicki Field as your “guide by the side,” and includes time for a brief lecture, self-reflection, fun exercises, and focused discussion. Handouts will be emailed to participants after each class.

    In part two of our program, we will identify the five circles of friendship, explore what friendship means to you, and learn to weed, seed, and feed your friendships.

     

     

    Life in the Time of Corona at a CCRC

    Thursday, October 22, 1:30 pm via Zoom

    In the last six months, we have all heard the phrase, “unprecedented times” more than we can count; indeed, they have been. For even the best planners among us, the covid-19 crisis has proven that we cannot plan for everything. Continuing Care Retirement Communities (CCRCs) exist for people who meticulously plan for themselves, their futures, and their loved ones. So how does a CCRC serve those people during this unplanned circumstance? How has community leadership balanced resident safety with resident happiness? How have they continued to provide the exceptional service and security that residents have been promised? How are managers and staff protecting and supporting each other in this new and changing landscape? Alia Granger, Sales Counselor at The Forest at Duke, discusses some of the particular challenges of the CCRC during this time.

     

     

    Zoom Movement Classes, Support Groups, and Education Programs Links Are on Our Website www.fearringtoncares.org.

    Occasionally Zoom program IDs and passwords will change; if you have saved a link it may eventually become inactive. Use the links on our website for a quick, current connection to all Zoom programs.

    If you would like to practice a Zoom connection and meeting, email info@fearringtoncares.org and we will set that up.

     

      

    Join Movement Classes via Zoom
    www.fearringtoncares.org

    All classes 11:30 am

    Mondays—Chair Yoga

    Wednesdays—Otago Fall-Prevention Exercises

    Thursdays—Line Dancing

    Join Support Groups via Zoom
    www.fearringtoncares.org

    Caregiver's Support Group: Wednesday, October 7 and 21, 12:30 to 2:00 pm

    Parkinson's Support Group: Wednesday, October 14 and 28, 3:30 to 4:30 pm

    Living with Chronic Conditions: Thursday, October 1 and 15, 1:00 to 2:30 pm

     

     

    Open Enrollment for Medicare Part D Drug Plans

    October 15 to December 7

    If you’re a Medicare recipient with a Part D Drug Plan, Medicare recommends that you check available Part D plans yearly to choose the best one for your current medications. Plans and prices change every year and if you choose the right plan, savings can be substantial.

    Open Enrollment only lasts from October 15 to December 7 and your new plan will take effect Jan 1, 2021. Changes to Part D Drug Plans are generally not allowed after Open Enrollment ends.

    Another option offered to Medicare recipients is a Medicare Advantage Plan in the same open Enrollment period: October 15 to December 7. A Seniors’ Health Insurance Information Program (SHIIP) counselor can provide information to help you decide if you want to choose a Medicare Advantage Plan or to switch from Medicare A, B and D to a Medicare Advantage Plan. If you currently have a Part D plan or a Medicare Advantage Plan and do not make a change, you will automatically be re-enrolled in the same plan for 2021. If you’re new to Medicare, you can enroll in any plan at the same time that you enroll in Medicare, regardless of dates. All information including available plans and pricing information is available online at www.medicare.gov.

    Fearrington Cares offers appointments with licensed SHIIP volunteers who live in our community to help you choose wisely. Due to covid-19, most appointments will be by phone. You will need to provide your counselor with a list of your drugs and preferred pharmacies so recommendations can be tailored to you and the particular drugs you take. In rare cases, there will be an opportunity to meet with your SHIIP volunteer at Fearrington Cares following CDC-advised practices.

    Call Fearrington Cares, 919-542-6877 before December 1 to request a conversation to review your plans; you then will be contacted by a licensed SHIIP Counselor.

     

     

    A Reminder: We Are Still Checking Messages!

    Don't Hesitate to Phone 919-542-6877!

    While the Fearrington Cares Center continues to be closed until it is safe again to reopen, as long as we have volunteer drivers available, Fearrington Cares will pick up groceries that you order (and pay for) online. We will not go to a resident’s home, pick up cash or credit cards and shop for residents—the service is limited to picking up prepaid orders from Harris Teeter, Lowe’s, or Walmart. Request this service using the transportation extension on our voicemail after you have information about a pickup time (no same-day or next-day delivery service.)

    Please call the Center if you wish to speak with Karen Metzguer, our Executive Director and Nurse. If you would like to borrow a piece of equipment, call the Center and make an appointment to pick it up.

    If you have borrowed equipment from Fearrington Cares and are no longer using it, Fearrington Cares would like it to be returned. Please call to make an appointment to return the item(s) you borrowed. Alternatively, you can leave the equipment on the front porch of our building, Monday—Friday, 9 am—12:00 pm. Please leave a note on it, telling us the name of the person who borrowed it so we can record the return.

     

     

    COVID-19 Information

    Fearrington Cares maintains a web site with county, state, and national information about the pandemic and the virus: fearringtoncares.org/resources/covid-19-coronavirus-current-information/.

     


     

    Fearrington Directory Changes

    Welcome to Our New Residents!

    The following persons were added to the Fearrington Village Directory between June 15 and September 15. Note we have extended the date range for this issue’s newcomers because several new residents were inadvertently omitted from the September 2020 issue.

    Name Address Contact Information
    Aldo G. (Bart) and Vicki
    BARTOLONE
    4069 Harnett Bart's Email: utvols66@gmail.com
    Vicki's Email: poppymom64@gmail.com
    Bart's Cell: 305-799-8002
    Vicki's Cell: 305-799-8001
     Diane G. and Jon CARNES 67 Trestle Leaf  Diane's Email: dtg999@gmail.com
    Jon's Email: jonc@nc.rr.com
    Diane's Cell: 919-624-6276
    Donna DAVID   17 West Madison (1160)  Donna's Email: donna.d@me.com
    Donna's Cell: 225-938-2332
     Gary CLOSE and Diane MOORE  403 Brampton Close Gary's Email: garicalizona@gmail.com
    Diane's Email: dimoore62@yahoo.com
    Gary's Cell: 928-210-0719
    Diane's Cell: 704-779-9279 
    Marianne K. and Ronald J. (Ron) GRETO  390 Lyndfield Close Marianne's Email: mgreto@comcast.net
    Ron's Email: ron.greto@gmail.com
    Home: 703-491-8739
    Marianne's Cell: 703-615-7906
    Ron's Cell: 703-625-7091
     C. HUCKSHORN  4 Macon (4004) Home: carhuckshorn@aol.com
    Cell: 561-251-3741
     Natalia and Victor
    ISAEVA
    35 Benchmark   
    Randall V. (Randy) and Sally M. JAMES  851 Millcroft  Randy's Email: srjames42@gmail.com
    Sally's Email: srjames49@gmail.com
    Randy's Cell: 315-778-7802
    Sally's Cell: 315-286-8884
     Andreea and Rob KAR  18 Benchmark Home: robandandreea@yahoo.com
    Home: 919-726-4033
    Marilyn M. and Ted H. KOENIG 293 Stoneview Marilyn's Email: Mkoenig@mindspring.com
    Ted's Email: Tkoenig@mindspring.com
    Home: 919-542-3344
    Marilyn's Cell: 919-812-7782
    Ted's Cell: 919-880-1363
    Doug & Linda LAMM 13 West Madison (1158) Doug's Email: dlbalto@yahoo.com
    Linda's Email: llbalto1947@yahoo.com
    Home: 919-533-6130
    Doug's Cell: 410-925-0230
    Linda's Cell: 410-236-1528
    Lorraine and Scott MEHLTRETTER 818 Langdon Lorraine's Email: lmehlt18@gmail.com
    Scott's Email: scpamehlt@gmail.com
    Lorraine's Cell: 919-717-3170
    Scott's Cell: 603-531-3896
    Terri PORTER 436 Wintercrest East Terri's Email: Tlport551@gmail.com
    Terri's Cell: 984-484-0234
    Drew A. REGISTER
    Thomas R. (TR) ROBERTS
    68 Trestle Leaf Drew's Email: daregister@gmail.com
    TR's Email: ttommrrobertss@gmail.com
    Drew's Cell: 347-634-7166
    TR's Cell: 917-501-9061
    Barbara ROONEY 308 Baneberry Close Home: bjo.rooney@gmail.com
    Home: 901-652-9618
    Betty SULLIVAN 24 Yancey (1082) Home: sullivanbetty12@gmail.com
    Betty's Cell: 401-626-0388
    Jeff and Tia EDWARDS 29 Caldwell (1205) Jeff's Email: jeffedwardsobx@gmail.com
    Tia's Email: tiasedwards@gmail.com
    Jeff's Cell: 410-800-8332
    Tia's Cell: 410-241-9795
    Lucy Cherry GRIST
    Rev. Samuel Latham (Sam) GRIST III
    27 Benchmark Lucy's Email: luce.grist@gmail.com
    Sam's Email: slgrist3@gmail.com
    Home: 984-234-4276
    Lucy's Cell: 910-783-7016
    Sam's Cell: 252-945-7873
    Chris HORN and Shirley MICHL 692 Spindlewood Chris's Email: cphorn.128@gmail.com
    Shirley's Email: shirley@intentionalwellnesscoach.com
    Chris's Cell: 919-523-9799
    Shirley's Cell: 919-260-7214
    Arthur (Art) and Sheila KEEGAN 4242 Henderson Place Art's Email: aekeegan@msn.com
    Sheila's Email: shkeegan@msn.com
    Art's Cell: 602-615-5091
    Sheila's Cell: 360-204-6811
    Brittany G. and Dr. Conner I. SANDEFUR 77 Trundle Ridge Brittany's Email: bmsandefur@gmail.com
    Conner's Email: sandefur@gmail.com
    Brittany's Cell: 734-845-8520
    Conner's Cell: 734-845-8516

     

    Changes to the Directory

    The following persons made changes to their Directory listings between June 15 and September 15. Note, we have extended the date range for this issue’s newcomers because several new residents were inadvertently omitted from the September 2020 issue.

    Name Address Contact Information
    Peter BOGART 1314 Langdon Place Email: spivvy@gmail.com
    Home: 919-619-3666
     Donald (Don) and Pamela (Pam)
        BONIN
     277 Quail Run Home: kittykats02@yahoo.com
    Don's Email: don@madisonmarketing-llc.com
    Home: 919-542-2446
    Don's Cell: 919-599-4117
    Pam's Cell: 919-599-4117
     Andrea GASKA
    Katherine (Kathy) PECHTER
    15 West Madison (1159)   Kathy's Email: kmpbythesea@yahoo.com
    Andrea's Cell: 917-579-3238
    Kathy's Cell: 917-608-9730
    Bob and Michelle
        CASSELL 
     492 Beechmast  Bob's Email: cassellbob@aol.com
    Michelle's Email: wrytrsblock@msn.com
    Home: 410-570-1233
    Dr. Art and Ruth
        GERBER
     840 Langdon  Art's Email: gerbsam22@gmail.com
    Ruth's Email: gerbs@nc.rr.com
    Home: 919-542-6785
    Dr. Fredric C. (Fred) and Nancy J. HALL  603 Stoneview Fred's Email: fhall12@icloud.com
    Nancy's Email: nhall400@icloud.com
    Home: 919-704-8899
    Fred's Cell: 651-600-9943
    Nancy's Cell: 651-600-9943
     Martha HAUSER  26 Caldwell (1207)  Email: marthachauser@gmail.com
    Home: 770-329-9091
    Gary and Hope HERBST  7 McDowell (1009) Gary's Email: gary.c.herbst@gmail.com
    Hope's Email: hope.d.herbst@gmail.com
    Gary's Cell: 908-337-2165
    Hope's Cell: 908-337-6626
    Glenn M. JONES
    Linda Robin (Robin) WARD
    63 Trestle Leaf Robin's Email: robinwardrw@gmail.com
    Home: 919-542-2101
    Robin's Cell: 984-363-5720
    James M. (Jim) KEATING
    Andrea Wise LEECH
    4 West Madison (1102) Home Email: nanny.leech@gmail.com
    Home: 910-692-6854
    Dorothy (Dottie) LABBOK 9 Yancey (1044) Email: dlabbok@yahoo.com
    Home: 919-500-9337
    Lee MCLEAN E-110 E Wing Email: jemclean2@gmail.com
    Home: 919-542-1424
    Cell: 919-357-5065
    James N. (Jimmy) and Ruth (Ruthie) PARKS 35 Caswell Sidewalk (1201) Jimmy's Email: jimilai55@verizon.net
    Ruthie's Email: ruthart9@gmail.com
    Jimmy's Cell: 443-631-6883
    Ruthie's Cell: 443-838-6855
    Eric SAUNDERS 485 Beechmast Email: esaunders@nc.rr.com
    Home: 919-533-3030
    Nancy SZOLNOKI 474 Beechmast Email: nszolnoki@aol.com
    Home: 984-215-0739

     

    Calendar for October 2020

    Fearrington Village clubs and groups will be meeting on these dates. Events are usually held at The Gathering Place unless stated otherwise. However, The Gathering Place is currently closed due to Covid-19 restrictions. Therefore, if you have questions, be sure to check with the person or web page listed in the “Contact” column for the most up-to-date information.

    Day/Date Time Organization Contact
    Thursday, October 8 9:00 am Women of Fearrington
    Coffee Klatch
    Mif Flaharty
    808-234-0008
     Tuesday, October 13  3 - 4:00 pm Genealogy Group
    Zoom Teleconference pm
     Linda Grimm
    919-533-6296
     Wednesday, October 21  1:30  Women of Fearrington
    General Meeting
    Guardian ad Litem webinar
     Tracy Bailey
    302-561-1298
     Thursday, October 23  10:00 am Women of Fearrington
    Road Trip to M&M Alpaca Farm
    Lunch: Small B&B
    Mif Flaharty
    808-234-0008

     

     medium fall leaf

     

     

  • FHA Newsletter: December 2020

    fearrington NL logo

    HOMEOWNERS’  ASSOCIATION  NEWSLETTER
    December 2020      Volume 39      Number 11

     

     

    President's Message

     

    Grumpy?

    I do not know about you, but I admit that this whole virus thing had made me even more grumpy than usual.

    I am glad I have all the FHA activity to keep me occupied. I appreciate having a great team of individuals with whom to work. I am delighted as well that we have developed the ability to work together so well via Zoom, and to communicate across the Village via our new newsletter format and webinars. Everyone on our team brings their own ideas and opinions. We have disagreements, but we are always able to work cooperatively and settle differences based on respect for each other.

    Like most people I miss working with others in person. Plus, many of us feel more “village bound”, with restaurants, shopping, and travel being restricted, and some external contacts falling away, nevertheless, “Hope springs eternal.” (Alexander Pope)
    As I said in an earlier article, I am proud to see once again how humans can adapt, find new ways of doing things, and just keep on keeping on. But adaptability requires another element to turn ideas into reality. That element is hope. Whether entirely rational or not, we have the eternal hope that by adapting and making changes things can improve and be even better.

    Once upon a time, I had a professor who presented ideas in a different way to help them stick in students’ minds. One section of his course dealt with why so many people commit suicide. He reoriented that section to discuss why more people do not commit suicide given all that we humans face in our lives. The answer was that somehow in our human character hope and adaptability reinforce each other so that we can overcome dark times.

    As some have suggested, we may face a long, dark winter because of the virus. However, we do know that we are going into spring with the potential for a vaccine, for economic and social recovery, as well as (I hope) less political turmoil.

    In our Village things look good for your FHA. We enter 2021 with a sound budget, a strong commitment to grounds and landscaping, a plan for Beechmast Pond, a resolution to our worries about wastewater treatment, and a new Management Company (Associa/HRW) to strengthen our ability to work effectively, and to efficiently respond to homeowner questions. We will also have the results of a community survey to enable the FHA to address those concerns that residents believe are most important.

    Wow! Having written all that, I feel less grumpy.

     

     

    Our Fearrington Homeowners’
    Association Newsletter

    The Newsletter is the official publication of our Fearrington Homeowners’ Association (FHA), produced by and for residents of Fearrington Village in Pittsboro, NC. The Newsletter contains community news, reports from FHA Board members, items of interest to residents, and announcements of club and neighborhood activities.

    The Newsletter is published electronically eleven times a year (July/August is a combined issue). A PDF copy of the current issue can be found on the FHA website: fearringtonfha.org.

    Submissions:

    Content deadlines are the 15th of the previous month. Send submissions to: editors@fearringtonfha.org. All persons submitting content will receive a confirmation email.

    Do you have content for an upcoming newsletter? Email us at the above address and we will send you the "Newsletter Guidelines" and "Style Sheet".

    Newsletter Staff:
    Jan Kowal Ann Melchior
    Leslie Palmer Deborah Repplier
    Jackie Walters  
    Printing and Distribution:
    Carol Kurtz Barbara Amago
    Fearrington Homeowners’ Association
    Board Members

    Our Fearrington Homeowners’ Association (FHA) is a volunteer, non-profit organization dedicated to the health, safety, and welfare of residents. In addition to fostering resident participation, the Board is responsible for maintenance of common property and covenant enforcement. For additional details, including job descriptions, click on the “FHA” tab on the FHA webpage (fearringtonfha.org).

    Officers  
    President: Carl Angel
    Vice President: Rose Krasnow
    Secretary: Leslee Shell
    Treasurer: Tony Daniels
    Directors  
    Communications: Gordon Pitz
    Community Affairs: Chris Jaeger
    Covenants: Eric Frank
    Grounds and Landscaping: Jesse Fearrington
    Health, Safety and Security: Warren Ort
    Infrastructure and Facilities: Mark Haslam

     


     

    From the Editors

    Update on Newsletter Naming ContestName Our Newsletter Contest vert yellow

    Thanks to all twenty-six Fearringtonians who submitted a total of fifty-one (wow!) suggestions for naming our newsletter. After much debate, we narrowed the choices to five at our November staff meeting. Watch for our January 2021 issue. Readers will receive instructions on how to vote for their favorite in our Survey Monkey poll. If all goes as we hope, the new name should appear on our nameplate this spring.


     

     

    From Our FHA Board

     

     

    Latebreaking News Re: Your Water Bills

    Due to a cyber incident that impacted the Chatham County Government on October 28, water bills were not issued in November. Personnel in the billing department of the Utilities and Water Division reported this week that it could be two (2) to four (4) more weeks before the billing system is fully operational. Of course, during this time, late fees will not be assessed.

    Individuals with further questions can contact the utilities office at 919-542-8270. A link to the Utilities and Water Division website is also provided below:

    https://www.chathamnc.org/services/utilities-water-division

     

     

    wastewaterEnvirolink Payments: Important Notice

    If you pay Envirolink wastewater treatment fees every month and use their autopay option, you may be in for a shock. A few residents discovered recently that they were in arrears for several months’ missed payments. They had signed up for automatic payments last year (2019). Since the rates did not change this year, they assumed the payments would be renewed and would continue automatically. This is not the case. It is necessary to set up automatic payments at the beginning of every year. If you use Envirolink autopay, please check the status of your account.

     

     

    Fearrington Homeowners Annual Meeting, 2020annual meeting 1 orig

     

    The 2020 Homeowners Association annual meeting was held Sunday November 15 as a Zoom webinar. Over 200 residents attended the meeting.

    FHA President Carl Angel opened the meeting with a review of the board’s activities during the previous year. As he noted, the board’s plans were seriously impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic, which forced everyone to change and adapt to new realities. Direct contact among board and residents was severely limited. However, some of the changes in procedures, such as moving to an online version of the newsletter and using webinars rather than open meetings, have had some beneficial consequences. Carl complimented the board on its ability to work together to solve problems and address serious issues. Some of these issues were reviewed by other speakers in the meeting and are summarized here. Carl noted finally how dependent we all are on the contributions of volunteers. Without the willingness of residents to help with the work that needs to be done, the village would be a much less attractive place to live.

    Wastewater Management

    Rose Krasnow, Vice President, reviewed developments that took place during the year concerning wastewater treatment. She summarized the origins of a plan to sell the Fearrington wastewater treatment plant to Old North State Water and integrate it with the plant at Briar Chapel. This plan had given rise to serious concerns among residents of both communities. A task force was formed to evaluate the planned system. An attorney helped us file a motion to intervene with the NC Utilities Commission (NCUC).

    As the situation grew more critical, Integra Water, which owned the majority of Old North State, withdrew its application to the NCUC. Fitch Creations has resumed its management of Fearrington’s wastewater system and plans to upgrade the system. As of January 1, it will no longer be managed by Envirolink. The FHA wastewater management task force is now sharing all it learned about new technologies with Fitch Creations.

    Rose noted that these developments are very encouraging, and she thanked the volunteers on the task force who had contributed so much time, effort, and expertise to the issue.

    New Management Company

    Rose also reviewed the search for a new management company. The existing contract with Towne Properties expires at the end of December. The board advertised for proposals from twelve management companies. Proposals were received from nine, suggesting that Fearrington is an outstanding community and that companies are happy to have us as part of their portfolio.

    Three finalists were interviewed, via Zoom. The clear winner was Associa/HRW, and a new contract with them will take effect January 1. They will send bills for the new year, and residents who pay electronically will need to change instructions to ensure that dues are sent to the right place.

    Residents should be receiving more information from Associa in the weeks ahead. A Community Manager will continue to have an office at the Gathering Place, as we have now. In addition, Associa offers other options when residents need questions answered quickly and, we hope, with minimum effort.

    Treasurer’s Report

    Tony Daniels, Treasurer, presented the FHA budget for 2020 and 2021. Details of the budget have been provided on the website. Tony talked about the Reserve fund and explained why it might seem so large. He suggested that overall, the 2020 budget is in a positive situation, in spite of the fact that there was a significant increase in legal fees. This increase was due primarily to the need for legal consultation concerning land transfers, and assistance in developing testimony for the NCUC. There is currently a surplus relative to predictions, but Tony pointed out that expenses during the last quarter tend to be quite a lot larger than for the rest of the year. There are plans to reallocate some unused operating funds to reserves so they earn higher rates of interest.

    There are a number of uncertainties that will impact the budget next year. The current situation led the board to propose a 2% increase in dues for 2021, less than the 5% which has been the norm. The dues will be $179, which as Tony pointed out, still amounts to less than 50 cents a day.

    Tony reminded everyone that a community survey will be circulated in November. The board wants to know which Fearrington services and amenities are most important to the community, in order to help them realign resources.

    Questions

    Residents were invited to submit questions to the board, either before the meeting began or during the meeting. There were 15 questions received prior to the meeting, which were answered by the appropriate board member. Over 30 questions were submitted during the meeting. Answers to these have been prepared and posted online, on the FHA website.

    Recording

    A recording of the webinar is now available online through the Zoom website.

     

     

    Get involvedVolunteers Corner

    Change on Community Affairs: As of November 15, we welcome Chris Jaeger as your new Director of Community Affairs. If you need to contact him about matters related to Community Affairs, you can still use the same email address as you did before: community@fhaboard.org.

    FHA Secretary Needed: The FHA is still looking for someone to fill the position of Secretary. This is a very important job that needs to be filled by Board appointment. Duties are described on page 75 of the 2020 printed Directory. For more information, contact Rose Krasnow at vp@fhaboard.org.

    Hospitality Office Volunteers: Even though the Hospitality Office Volunteers have not been staffing the office since March, they have been completing a variety of tasks as needed. Starting in January, we hope to have volunteers in the office two or three mornings a week. Details to be announced.

     

     

    More on the Mystery of the Fearrington Postal Addressescourier truck

    One of the little mysteries that confronts Fearrington residents is why our postal address is the way it is—a line for the street address followed by a line with the Fearrington Post number. Why both? And is it critical that they appear in that order?

    Here is the definitive answer to those questions, as provided by the Pittsboro postmaster: The last address before the city, state, and zip code is used for delivery purposes.

    Example: John Doe
                  3 Matchwood
                  3 Fearrington Post
                  Pittsboro, NC 27312

    The Fearrington Post is the delivery address. The street name helps subs so they do not have to use the directory book to look up the actual physical address in many cases, according to:

    Peter J. Siragusa
    Postmaster
    Pittsboro, NC 27312
    919-642-0128

    I’m still not sure I fully understand, but no matter—if that’s how the Postal Service wants it to be, that’s what I’ll use.

    Don’t forget, companies such as UPS and Amazon that should deliver packages to your door need the street address, so you may as well use the same format for everyone.

    —Gordon Pitz (communications@fhaboard.org)

     

     

    cropped certCommunity Emergency Response Team

    The Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) program is a nationally supported, locally implemented initiative that teaches people how to better prepare themselves for hazards that may affect their communities. CERT trains them in basic disaster response skills such as team organization, disaster medical operations, fire safety and light search and rescue. Local CERT programs train and organize teams of volunteers to assist their families, neighbors, co-workers, and other community members during emergencies when professional responders may not be immediately available to provide assistance. Before, during, and after disasters, CERT volunteer teams perform basic response activities including checking in on neighbors, distributing information to the public, supporting emergency operation centers and helping to manage traffic and crowds. The ability for CERT volunteers to perform these activities frees up professional responders to focus their efforts on more complex, essential, and critical tasks. CERT volunteers also support their communities by organizing, promoting, and participating in emergency events, activities, and projects.

    With training and information, individuals and community groups can be prepared to serve as crucial resources capable of performing many of the emergency functions needed in the immediate post-disaster period.

    Some examples of training provided are online classes, talks by emergency professionals and actual field exercises.

    Over the summer, CERT volunteers participated along with CORA in the Farmers to Family program to deliver food to families. CERT provided the manpower to load boxes onto charity vehicles.

    In October 2020, CERT volunteers assisted in a Helicopter Aquatic Rescue training event at Jordan Lake.

    Volunteers worked with the Chatham County Public Health Director to provide traffic control personnel for the Employee Drive-Thru Flu Clinic. This exercise served as a precursor for the possible distribution of a COVID-19 vaccine when made available.

    At one time Fearrington had our own CERT program, but due to budget reallocation, the program was transferred to county control.

    If you are interested in joining or learning more about the CERT program, contact info@ChathamCERT.org or Fearrington resident Steve Krasnow at kkras4@verizon.net. An additional source for Fearrington CERT information is on the FHA web site under Health, Safety & Security/Community Response team planning.

    —FHA Health, Safety and Security

     

     

    dogs playingNew Dog Park

    Good news for Fearrington dog owners. There is a new Chatham County dog park under construction. It is located on several acres of land within the Park at Briar Chapel, 1015 Andrews Store Road, opposite the rear entrance to Briar Chapel. There are separate large and small dog runs to avoid issues with larger dogs getting aggressive with smaller breeds. There has been an unforeseen delay in installation of water lines and park benches due to Covid and the recent cyberattack on the county’s communication systems. But the fence is completely installed and hopefully it will be open before year-end. The park will be available to the public.

    There has been previous interest in building a dog park here in Fearrington, and Fitch was willing at one point to donate the land. But a site that suited neighbors could never be decided. Hopefully, this will provide owners the chance to let their dogs romp, run off leash and socialize with other dogs. After food, water and shelter the next thing a dog needs is adequate exercise. A tired dog is a good dog. Without exercise a dog will likely become frustrated and find boundless ways to annoy and destroy. The location is nearly in our backyard and not nearly as far away as the other existing dog park at Southern Village. So, keep an ear to the ground for when it opens and give it a try. Your dog will thank you.

    —Gary Kibler, for the Health, Safety and Security Committee

    Editor’s Note:

    Thanks, Gary, for making Fearringtonians aware of the coming dog park. A well-designed park is a welcome addition to a community, and a fun romp there can be the highlight of a dog’s day.

    Canine experts advise, however, that puppies, young adolescent dogs, toy breeds and many adult dogs don’t belong at dog parks. Toy breed dogs are at special risk (Google “predatory drift”). The high arousal and rough play often found at dog parks turn many dogs off. One bad experience at a dog park can be very costly to your dog’s physical and mental well-being.

    Other options exist. An arranged play date in a fenced yard with a compatible neighborhood dog allows dogs to shed the leash and exercise freely. A responsibly run dog daycare facility with staff trained in supervising dog-to-dog interactions is another alternative.

    Want to educate yourself before you decide? Off Leash Dog Play by Robin Bennet & Susan Briggs will teach you to recognize appropriate and inappropriate dog play, as well as how to know when your dog isn’t having fun. Also, the Association of Professional Dog Trainers offers an in-depth look at this topic (Dog Parks: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly) on their web page at APDT.com. Click on the Resource Center tab and then click on the Dog Park icon.

    Yes, we agree with Gary, a tired dog is a good dog. All our dogs, no matter their age, size or personality, benefit from play and enrichment, and they get to define what fun is for them.

    —Ann Melchior, on behalf of The Newsletter Staff

     


     

     

     

    The Land and the People – Part 2
    Beyond the Tombstones – The Legacies

    By Mike Zbailey

    EDITOR’S NOTE: Part 1 – The Historic Cemetery at Galloway Ridge (Nov. 2020) ended with the Smith family moving together into their home, Oakland, on Smith Level Road. Part 2 focuses on Mary Ruffin Smith and her influence on the larger community in which we live.

    Jones Grove Cemetery at Galloway Ridge

    The Jones Grove Cemetery at Galloway Ridge
    Photo by Mike Zbailey

    Mary’s brother, Sidney, died in 1867 at the age of 48. Their brother, Frank, died in 1877 at the age of 61 and was buried in the Jones Grove Cemetery. Maria Spear, Mary’s former tutor and lifelong friend, moved into Oakland after Frank’s death. After Maria’s death in 1881, Mary confided to a friend, “I am alone in this world. I miss her too much.” The star-crossed Harriet, Mary’s enslaved servant and the mother of Mary’s nieces, was freed after the Civil War and lived in a cabin near Oakland. In 1872, while in her cabin, she was struck by lightning and became paralyzed. Mary provided for her daily care until Harriet’s death in 1873.

    Mary’s four nieces remained in the house with her. Mary provided for their education and raised them in the Episcopal church. The nieces were courted under Mary’s watchful eye, and each eventually married. Cornelia, Sidney’s daughter, and the oldest, married Robert Fitzgerald in 1869. Robert was a Civil War veteran from the Massachusetts Colored Regiment and was wounded at Petersburg. He had attended college and moved south to help educate freed slaves. He would become the grandfather of Pauli Murray, the most notable descendant of the family.

    With her inheritance following Frank’s death, Mary was now one of the wealthiest landowners in the area. Mary Ruffin Smith died quietly at Oakland on November 13, 1885 at the age of 71. A large procession of carriages escorted the hearse to the Jones Grove cemetery where she was buried. She was described in the newspaper as “a lady of uncommon strength of mind, lofty character and large charity."

    Kemp Battle, the President of the struggling post-Civil War University of North Carolina and one of Mary’s good friends, was named executor in her will. Mary willed about 1,400 acres of her property to the University of North Carolina for scholarships for the education of indigent students. The Smith scholarships allowed the university to increase its enrollment and broaden its student body. Mary Ruffin Smith is honored by the University with a plaque inside Memorial Hall. Mary gave her nieces - Emma, Annette, and Laura – 100 acres each from the Jones Grove Plantation land. From the Price Creek Plantation, Mary gave Cornelia 100 acres and willed the rest to the Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina.

    The story continues. Cornelia’s husband, Robert Fitzgerald, taught school, farmed, and had a small brick-making operation. He began to slowly go blind because of a war injury, but even with his failing eyesight he built a small house at 906 Carroll Street in Durham where it still stands.

    Jones Grove Cemetery at Galloway Ridge

    Pauli Murray's childhood home in Durham
    Photo by Mike Zbailey

    Agnes, one of the Fitzgerald children, became a nurse and moved to Baltimore where she married William Murray, a teacher. Their youngest child, Anna Pauline, whom they called Pauli, was born in 1910. Following the death of Pauli’s parents when she was three, she went to live with her grandparents, Cornelia and Robert Fitzgerald, in Durham. Pauli graduated from Hillside High School in Durham and attended Hunter College in New York, graduating in 1933. She worked as a teacher and social worker and met Eleanor Roosevelt when Mrs. Roosevelt was visiting a CCC women’s working camp in upstate New York where Pauli was employed. They would form a long-lasting friendship.

    Then came three events that would change the trajectory of Pauli’s life. In 1938, she applied to the law school of the University of North Carolina. She was refused admission because of her race. The second incident was in 1940 when Pauli and a friend took a bus from New York to Durham to visit her family. They were arrested in Petersburg, Virginia for sitting in the front of the bus and refusing to go to the back. She would not pay the fine and spent several days in jail before being released. In 1941, Pauli entered Howard University’s Law School where she was the only woman. She was class President and graduated first in the class. Then came the third life changing event. Traditionally Harvard Law School offered a fellowship for further study to the top student at Howard. Pauli applied but was rejected because of her gender. Later she earned a Doctorate from Yale Law School.

    Pauli became a civil rights lawyer and activist for women’s rights. Her writings were used as part of the basis for the landmark school desegregation case, Brown vs. Board of Education. Pauli was not shy about advocating for important issues and wrote a critical letter to her friend, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., asking why there were no women in leadership positions for the March on Washington in 1963. In 1971, future Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg named Murray an honorary co-author in her brief successfully overturning a gender discrimination case before the US Supreme Court.

    Pauli’s list of accomplishments continued: she was a co-founder of NOW (National Organization for Women), was named Woman of the Year by Mademoiselle magazine in 1947, served on President Kennedy’s Commission on the Status of Women, and published the highly acclaimed biography of her grandparents, Proud Shoes.

    Capping her career, Pauli became the first black woman in the US to become a priest in the Episcopal Church, the church of Mary Ruffin Smith. Her first service was in the small Chapel of the Cross in Chapel Hill where her grandmother, Cornelia, was baptized. Pauli Murray was named a Saint in the Episcopal Church in 2012. The Bishop said of her, “Pauli Murray had an agenda for human good that was constant and unswerving.”

    Pauli Murray died on July 1, 1985 and is buried in the Cypress Hills Cemetery in New York. Her girlhood home on Carroll Street in Durham is being restored and will house the Pauli Murray Center for History and Social Justice. Pauli was honored on her one hundredth birthday in 2010 by both Duke and UNC. In 2016, Yale University named a residential college for her.

    The Jones Grove land passed through several owners until it was purchased by R.B. Fitch who developed Fearrington Village. Pauli Murray’s legacy lives on in the laws of the land as well as the lives she has influenced. Jones Grove cemetery, still owned by the University of North Carolina, holds an impressive monument at Mary Smith’s grave and nine graves, including those of Mary’s brother, Sidney, and her parents. Maria Spear, Mary’s friend, is the only non-family member buried in the cemetery. The nine people lying in this small cemetery have a checkered history, but they leave an important legacy that affects us to this day.

    "True emancipation lies in the acceptance of the past...in facing up to the degradation as well as the dignity of my ancestors." Pauli Murray

     

     

    Main Street Pittsboro Receives Prestigious National Volunteerism Award

    By Ken SternadThree Logos

    Main Street Pittsboro has been named one of the nation’s top 100 winners of the Small Town America Civic Volunteer Award (STACVA), a new program designed to recognize and honor outstanding public service volunteers. The nonprofit organization was nominated by Pittsboro Mayor Jim Nass and Pittsboro Commissioner Kyle Shipp. “The vitality of the downtown area has really been bolstered by the work of this group, and it is all done by volunteers,” said Commissioner Shipp.

    Among the accomplishments he cited were the organization’s efforts to provide matching funds to property owners to pay for downtown building façade improvements, installation of benches and new recycling containers, and handrails for better handicap accessibility. The group was also praised for launching Local on Main: Pittsboro's Art and Farm Dinner, an annual event where local farmers and restaurants prepare meals served by volunteers, while local musicians entertain attendees. “In the last year alone the Main Street Pittsboro District has seen six new businesses open, one business expand, 62 full-time jobs created and almost $7 million in private investment,” Shipp also noted.

    Pittsboro's Art & Farm Dinner

    Pittsboro's Art & Farm Dinner
    Photo by Bett Wilson Foley

    During a time when Pittsboro is realizing unprecedented growth, it’s not surprising that there’s an effort to ensure a vital downtown that also preserves the small-town integrity and uniqueness. Downtown Pittsboro, much like Fearrington Village offers the promise of a way of life—where people care for one another, where they smile and wave at folks they may not know, and where the momentum of life slows to a pace that fosters appreciation.

    In addition to national recognition, the Small Town America Civic Volunteer Award provides Pittsboro with a new municipal website, designed and hosted for one year by CivicPlus, sponsor of the STACVA program. The timing of the award, valued at $10,000, could not have been better, as Pittsboro had already budgeted for a new town website this year. Check out https://mainstreetpittsboro.org/.

    Bart Russell, a principal with the Barton Russell Group, which created and administered the award program, applauded Main Street Pittsboro for its tremendous accomplishments. “Civic volunteerism is the lifeblood of many small communities, and the hometown heroes from Pittsboro being recognized by this award exemplify the very best of what it means to give back to the communities in which they live,” said Russell, who is a nationally recognized small-town America expert.

    Fearrington Village resident Larry Newlin expressed his appreciation for the vision and hard work represented by members of Main Street Pittsboro. Newlin, a former White House rural policy advisor and former colleague of Bart Russell at the National Association of Towns and Townships, shared, “I’ve been really impressed by this organization’s work to help make our historic downtown a place where people want to visit and do business.”

    Main Street Pittsboro got its start in 2011 when the town applied to the North Carolina Department of Commerce and was accepted into the North Carolina Main Street program. This statewide program is designed to help historic downtowns rebound from the loss of businesses and capitalize on their unique assets to retain existing businesses while also attracting new ones. NC Main Street is affiliated with Main Street America, a national network of more than 1,200 towns that share both a commitment to create high-quality places and build stronger communities through preservation-based economic development.

    “Downtown revitalization programs play a crucial role in ensuring strong, vibrant communities, and the work of Main Street Pittsboro and their volunteers will be more important than ever as we weather the impacts of the pandemic,” observed Patrice Frey, president and CEO of Main Street America.

    images/newsletters/graphics/welcome-center-Pittsboro-Dec2020.jpeg

    Pittsboro/Chatham County Welcome Center
    Photo by Michael Fiocco

    The Main Street Pittsboro organization is led by an all-volunteer board of local residents including Commissioner Mike Dasher, Thomas Delafield, Commissioner Michael Fiocco, Lesley Landis, Greg Lewis, Maria Parker-Lewis, and Randy Voller. And their work continues. The Pittsboro/Chatham County Welcome Center, spearheaded and financed by the group, has received its certificate of occupancy and has begun moving in furniture and equipment.

    Of course, Main Street Pittsboro must proceed cautiously with the restrictions and challenges from the Covid-19 pandemic. In fact, the group has postponed many of the previously planned events that typically support its efforts. But these challenges have not hindered their enthusiasm, according to Mayor Nass, and they continue to look for more opportunities in the future to enhance the community of Pittsboro.

     

     

    The 28th Annual Chatham Artists Guild Studio Tour

    It’s that time of year again when the Chatham Artists Guild Studio Tour welcomes visitors into member artists’ studios on the first two weekends of December: Saturdays, December 5th and 12th, 10:00 to 5:00, and Sundays, December 6th and 13th, 12:00 to 5:00. A total of 42 local artists will offer the opportunity to safely experience their inspirations and to purchase affordable original works of art. Paintings, sculpture, pottery, photography, glass, wood, digital, and fabric art will be on display.

    This year’s tour will strictly follow NC Health and Human Services Guidelines. To ensure your safety, studios will be clean and sanitized. Masks, social distancing, and hand sanitizing will be required for all visitors, and there will be limits on the number of guests in the studio at one time. See https://chathamartistsguild.org/2020-virtual-tour/ for virtual tour information.

    Artists Among Us

    While 2020 has in no way been a typical year for the artists participating in the Chatham Artists Guild Studio Tour, it has been a productive one. Fearrington Village boasts seven Chatham Guild Artists on the tour, among our many artists who have chosen to live and create within our community. While not all have decided to open their studios during the tour weekends, you can still experience creativity at work through virtual tours. Additionally, opportunities to purchase artwork or arrange for private studio tours are listed on individual websites.

    Greenslade ForrestForrest C. Greenslade PhD: Nature-inspired Paintings and Sculpture

    “I was that kid you could always find turning over rocks in streams, looking for what wonders nature would disclose to me. This curiosity about the natural world led me to a serious life as scientist and organizational executive. Now in retirement, I am again doing what I did in grammar school—turning over rocks and sculpting and painting the wonders that nature discloses.” 149 Tinderwood, 919-545-9743, www.OrganicForrestry.com. Virtual Tour Only

    Lani Chaves: Real and Imagined People, Places, and ThingsLani Chaves

    “I am grateful for this opportunity to bring you the full scope of my work to date. By embodying both the seen and the unseen in my paintings I am attempting to frame our shared world anew—in unexpected and beautiful ways. I invite you to discover what these paintings mean to you.” 167 Wintersage, 919-414-6003, lanichaves.com. First Weekend Only, Studio #19

    West KarenKaren West: Oil Paintings and Prints of Diverse Domestic and International Subjects

    “During my years living and working abroad, I spent time observing and trying to understand the unique expressions of people’s lives in their environments. This resulted in a number of paintings depicting people in activity that is meaningful to them, capturing universal emotions—joy, wonder, dedication, defiance. I also paint landscapes, still life paintings, and animals in their habitats. My goal is to create compelling compositions, patterns, light, and color congruence, with an image that draws the eye because of artistic harmony, but that provokes thought and emotion.” 923 Woodham - Home Studio, by appt. only, 919-457-8090, www.KarenWestgallery.com. Virtual Tour Only

    Leslie Palmer: Drawings, Watercolor and Mixed Media Paintings, Giclée PrintsLeslie Palmer

    “I delight in the creative process. It gives me energy, frees my spirit. My role as an artist is to nurture the creative space within me. I invite viewers to explore my paintings, let their spirit dance or rest in my world of imagery, colors, and mood. In my subjects, I search to capture the beauty and the mundane in the belief that G-d travels incognito. I find there is drama in layered color, understated texture, and subtle brush movements. This visual poetry speaks directly in the language of the soul, emotions…of intuition. My desire is to encourage reflection, quiet contemplation—a respite from life’s chatter.” 110 Creekwood, Studio visits and classes by appt. 919-929-9268, www.LesliePalmerFineArt.com. Virtual Tour Only

    Jim AikenJim Aiken: Acrylic Paintings, both Abstract and Light in Nature Impressionism

    “I’m a scientist and an artist. I love a unique and beautiful experiment, whether it’s in the laboratory or on canvas. Places I remember and recreate have distinct light effects that amplify shadows, shapes, and colors. Often my images are of nature, both real landscapes and synthesized ones, with various degrees of abstraction. I have been experimenting, recently, with abstract images that convey color harmony, texture, and motion. These celebrate earth, its elements, air, water, land, with a goal of juxtaposing colors surprisingly, drawing the viewer into airy, solid, liquid, and movement patterns that keep coaxing the eye back for more.” 300 Village Way, 970-471-3066, https://chathamartistsguild.org/artists/jim-aiken/. Virtual Tour Only

    Minnie C. Gallman: Photography and Note Cards Depicting Nature and Eclectic SubjectsMinnie Gallman

    “Photography is a creative outlet that encourages me to look at the world in a different way. My studio is the world and everything in it. My camera is my canvas and my lenses are my brushes. My digital darkroom allows me to refine my vision and use my imagination. I enjoy photographing a variety of subjects—architecture, abstracts, people, boats, monuments, and old cars. My primary interest is nature photography which presents a constant challenge to create photographs of something that is familiar to all of us.” 22 Speyside Circle, Home Studio, by appt. only, 919-533-6616, www.Minnie-Gallman.pixels.com. Virtual Tour Only

    Bensen VidabethVidabeth Bensen: Original Hand-printed Cards, T-shirts, Framed and Unframed Prints, Calendars

    "I've made hundreds of sketches during my years of living, traveling, and teaching in Europe and Asia and often return to those sketches for inspiration. I also find subject matter in the changing seasons in North Carolina. Each print is made from a stencil inspired by an original drawing and is hand cut or painted by hand on the screen. What I do is physical, so my level of production has changed a bit. This results in many more limited editions.” 601 Stoneview, 804-833-1401, www.HouseOfLifePrints.com. Virtual Tour Only

     

     

    Jenny’s Park Clean-up—A Garden Club Service Project

    Text by Dan Freehling, West Camden; Photos by Tony Daniels and Lee Newlin

     

    Garden Club Service Project
    Garden Club Service Project

    In this time of Covid-19, finding safe projects and educational opportunities has been a challenge, but the Fearrington Garden Club has undertaken a new service opportunity that is outdoors, educational, and beneficial to the entire Fearrington community. The first Sunday of each month, members of the Garden Club descend on Jenny’s (aka Camden) Park—pruning shears and loppers and garden trowels in hand—to weed, prune, and even do some planting.

     

    Garden Club Service Project
    Garden Club Service Project

    Club members and friends have met twice already, each time with close to 20 participants and working under the supervision of Ryan Cadwalader, Fearrington gardener and arborist. The work to date has taken place along the walking path of the lower pond and the center path leading from the pond up to the wildflower garden. Five dump truck loads of pruned limbs, “volunteers,” debris, and weeds have been hauled away, while more than 50 new plants have been added by the woods’ end of the pond. Pond views from the walking path are much improved and shrubs along the center path are more presentable, all while maintaining an appropriate habitat for wildlife—two mallards and a heron were spotted in November! Weather permitting, we’ll be gathering again the first Sunday in December. Until then, come enjoy a walk in the park, made all the more pleasant thanks to your fellow gardening enthusiasts.

     

    Garden Club Service Project
    Garden Club Service Project

     


     

    Announcements

     

    Fearrington Groups and Organizations

     

    Bulls BearsFearrington Bulls & Bears

    The Fearrington Bulls & Bears Investment Club is a group of Fearrington residents who are interested in improving their investment knowledge and capabilities. We meet monthly during non-summer months and communicate even more regularly through an email exchange group to share information, insights, and ideas about investing.

    Guests are welcome to participate in a group meeting or in our email exchange group to gauge their interest in joining the Club. The next meeting will be held by Zoom on December 11 at 9:30 am.

    For more information about the Club, meetings or the exchange, please contact:

    Anna Shearer, President, at 703-217-0322 or ashearer1219@gmail.com.

     

     

    Fearrington Democratic ClubFearrington Dem Club Sm

    The Democratic Club is taking a post-election break but will return to Zoom-based programs and other activities in January. Because of early deadlines for this newsletter, we encourage you to check the Club’s website http://www.fearringtondems.org/ after the holidays for updated program information and other resources.

     

     

    Fearrington Garden Club logoFearrington Garden Club

    Reminder about the Poinsettia Sale: if you ordered poinsettias, the date to pick up your plant(s) is Tuesday, December 8. (Sorry, but the deadline has passed for any new orders.) Pickup will be by appointment—and plants will be safely placed in your car trunk at a drive-by delivery point in Fearrington. Notification of your pick-up time and place is in progress. For questions, please contact Marilyn Boyle at 919-904-2217 or maboyle17e@gmail.com.

     

     

    Fearrington Genealogy GroupFearrington Genealogy Group

    Tuesday, December 8, 3:00 pm, Zoom teleconference. Details will be emailed to members around the first of the month. Newcomers welcome. Contact: Linda Grimm at 919-533-6296

     

     

    greenscenebanner2Fearrington Green Scene

    The last few months have provided a bumper crop of significant environmental developments. While the inexorable march of the Covid-19 virus has been an extremely serious negative development, there have also been quite a few positive developments that deserve recognition. On the very local community scene, I would like to report some results for the October 17 "3-in-1" event at The Gathering Place. With the enthusiastic cooperation of our fellow residents, we collected and shredded 8,400 pounds of Fearrington confidential paper. To put that in a bit of historical perspective: our May 2019 event generated 4,920 pounds. Our October 2019 event generated 5,040 pounds. In addition, the folks from the Chatham County Sheriff's Department collected 31.8 pounds of pharmaceuticals. That's a lot of unused pills that won't be flushed down the toilet.

    Which is a convenient segue to another very positive community development. As Rose Krasnow reported at the FHA Annual (Zoom) Meeting on November 15, the company involved with the proposed interconnection of our Fearrington wastewater system with the (troubled) Briar Chapel wastewater treatment system withdrew its merger application from consideration by the NC Public Utilities Commission on October 20, 2020. This action had the result of canceling the proposed merger. Fitch Creations will resume responsibility for managing our aged wastewater treatment facility. This is an important step in our community retaining "control of our own destiny" when it comes to creating an improved facility that will more effectively treat our wastewater. The FHA Wastewater Management Task Force looks forward to assisting Fitch Creations in constructively dealing with this issue.

    And while those two community developments were very gratifying, we shouldn't ignore the important Global Environment development in early November, when the presidential election resulted in Joe Biden becoming President-Elect. Mr. Biden has pledged to return the United States to the UN Paris Agreement on Climate Change—an important "first step" in addressing the major environmental issue of our lifetime—and likely our grandchildren's lifetime.

    —Jason Welsch, 914-806-4852 (Cell Phone)
    Moderator, Fearrington Green Scene

     

     

    Fearrington Swim & Croquet ClubSwim Croquet Club logo

    A virtual Annual Membership meeting is scheduled for January 31, 2021, 4 to 5 pm. Virtual meeting instructions and details about our board election will be sent after the holidays. We will be electing several new board members.

    Remember Thursday morning ladies croquet continues at 10 am throughout the winter. If you are new, we will help you get started. Come join us!

    As the time approaches for renewals next year, remember to save your membership cards. All cards are reusable. Keeping them saves the time and resources of making hundreds of new cards.

     

     

    Music recorderFearrington Village Singers Holiday Variety Show

    Thursday, December 3, 4 pm

    Join the Fearrington Village Singers on Zoom as they celebrate the holiday season with a variety of talent from the chorus.

    • Songs by Tom Ludlow
    • Recollections by Dorothy Samitz, Janet Keefer, Doug Rhodes, and Vince Tollers
    • Tad McArdle on the djembe African drum
    • Short stories by Mike Hardy and Pam Beaubien
    • A guitar show-and-tell by Bob Maarschalkerweerd
    • One of Matt Fry’s original songs
    • Musical selections by Vera Gray and Gina Harrison
    • A duet by Larry Nessly and Ruth Appel
    • A sing-along
    • Maybe more!

    Everyone is invited to join us on Zoom. Paste this link in your browser: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85336503002?pwd=YVA0UjRTdWlhUjRjaFdZd2lhaHZCQT09.

    Or, find the Zoom link posted on fearringtonvillagesingers.org.

     

     

    Women of FearringtonWOF CMYK Oval

    Remember how excited you were as a child to receive a toy at the holiday season? You couldn’t wait to open your presents! Through its annual toy drive, WoF helps provide happiness for children in need. This year there are two ways to give: an Amazon wish list assembled by Chatham County DSS at https://www.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/3N6XZ4FFWQAHU?ref_=wl_share (Specify “Wilder Horner, Chatham County DSS.”) with toys delivered directly to DSS or a toy drop-off (unwrapped and new) at 4036 South McDowell before December 1.

    In this season of giving, please remember WoF’s Wonderful Options Fund, which provides grants to organizations serving women and children in need in Chatham County. Your gift may honor a loved one and can be included in your holiday card. Donation forms can be found at https://www.womenoffearrington.org/fundraising.

    There is still time to order goodies from our Holiday Bakery and Market Tuesday, December 8. See https://www.womenoffearrington.org/holiday-bakery for your pre-order form. All proceeds benefit charity.

     

     

    Chatham County Agencies

    Chatham Connecting logoChatham Connecting

    With the December holidays just around the corner we are reminded especially of the needs of our Chatham County neighbors. Here are three organizations that you could help right now.

    "Christmas Wishes," a program of Chatham County Social Services (DSS) provides holiday gifts for children in foster care and/or receiving services through the child welfare system. Each year community donors volunteer to fulfill 3 specific "wishes" for each child enrolled in the program. Sponsors also may choose to give a financial contribution. All sizes of sponsorship are graciously welcomed. You may complete a pledge form at https://forms.gle/9T1BPirar7kh7KMV7. A monetary contribution may be sent by check payable to Chatham County DSS Foster Children’s Fund at: PO Box 489, Pittsboro, NC 27312. For more information: (919) 726-6270.

    "Christmas Dreams" provides Christmas gifts for needy adult clients. Donors can choose to send a monetary donation or gift certificate for a specific retailer to the Chatham County DSS Adult Services Fund at the Pittsboro address above. Additionally, donations of personal goods, such as toiletry items, personal care items, and new or gently used clothing, are always welcomed. For more information: (919) 642-6958.

    “Angel Tree” is a program of the Chatham County Council on Aging to help seniors during the holidays. Chatham County Council on Aging promotes and encourages independent living and physical and mental wellness among the population over 60 years of age via a broad variety of agency activities. For more information call (919)542-4512.

    Bottom line: You will make a positive difference in an elderly person or a child’s holiday experience by donating now. For more information about these and over 100 other non-profits in need of your help please visit chathamconnecting.org.

     

     

    United Way CampaignUW Logo for web only 350x74

    The annual United Way of Chatham County campaign is underway. Fearrington residents are generous supporters of United Way and its funded agencies. Based on last year’s pledges of $127,888, this year’s goal for the Fearrington Village–Galloway Ridge campaign is $128,000.

    Many in the Chatham community continue to struggle due to the impacts of Covid-19. Chatham has seen an increase in the number of hungry children, homeless families, and isolated seniors this year. Please help make a difference in their lives by donating today. Visit www.unitedwayofchathamcounty.org and click “Donate Now” in the top right corner. Or return the pledge card you receive in the mail to PO Box 1066, Pittsboro, NC 27312 or call the United Way office at (919) 542-1110. Every dollar pledged through the United Way of Chatham County stays here to support Chatham residents.

    —Jack Zollinger, Galloway Ridge; Ruth Murphy and Ellen Shanahan, Fearrington Village

     

     

    Continuing Education Opportunities

    Shared Learning Association of Chapel Hill

    Chapel Hill’s Shared Learning Association offers non-credit educational courses for people who love to ‘share learning’ with other adults with similar interests. Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, Shared Learning will offer 24 online courses via Zoom, beginning January 11 and ending in April. Full semester courses are moderated by our members and include fine arts, hard sciences, humanities, current events and social and behavioral sciences.

    For a Winter membership fee of $25, students may take as many courses as they can fit into their schedule. The Winter 2021 Catalog includes a registration form with full course descriptions and schedule and is available online at: http://sharedlearning.us. Or, to receive a paper copy, you may contact Mary Ann Freedman at: (919) 593-3335, (maryafreedman@gmail.com). Registration for the Shared Learning Spring Online Courses will begin the first week in December.

     

     


    fcares logo

     

     

     

    The Fearrington Cares Center Will Be Closed December 21–January 3.

    The Fearrington Cares Staff will not be monitoring the phones or making appointments. All messages left in the general mailbox will be retrieved on January 4, when the staff is back at work. Volunteer drivers will continue to pick up prepaid groceries and prescriptions while we are closed; leave a message only in the Transportation mailbox and a volunteer will be in contact with you.

     

     

    Celebrating Pat with Gratitude

    Fearrington Cares is fortunate to have had an extraordinary employee in Pat Skiver and now she is retiring! Selfishly, we are tempted to beg her to stay, claiming we simply can’t do without her services! Instead, I ask you to join me in my deep appreciation for the talent, compassion, expertise, and care exhibited by Pat, here at Fearrington Cares and in every corner of the neighborhood. Pat’s note to you is as follows:

    In January 2008, just three months after moving to Fearrington, I started working part-time at Fearrington Cares. I didn’t know much about the organization then, now 13 years later I am going to retire from employment, but not from volunteering. I know a lot more about Fearrington Cares now, and that is why Tom and I both believe that it is the “heart of Fearrington Village”. This job enabled me to meet my neighbors, make new friends, and serve my community. It has truly been a pleasure to work with so many generous, kindhearted people who are willing to give of themselves for their community. I am so pleased to call Fearrington Village home. Thank you all for your support, your commitment to CARING, and your friendship.—Pat

     

     

    Living with Loss Around the Holidays

    Thursdays, December 3 and 17, 1:00–2:30 pm via Zoom

    Living with Loss Around the Holidays is a support group for those who have experienced the loss of a loved one—spouse, parent, child, family member, or friend. “The Holidays,” November through the end of the year, are often painful. This period may be filled with memories of loved ones no longer alive and with us in remembered, happy ways.

    Meeting twice in November and twice in December at 1:00 pm on Zoom, this group is hosted by Judyth and John Branson. Residents of Fearrington since 2012, Judyth is a psychotherapist and John is a retired Episcopal priest.

    This is a group where we talk about feelings: grief, being alone, emptiness, fear of the future, and doubts about ourselves. We will have a chance to speak of our loved ones and all that is good. There are no expectations; this is simply a chance to meet and talk in the safety of the group where confidentiality is maintained. All are welcome to one or more sessions.

     

     

    Zoom Movement Classes, Support Groups, and Education Programs Links Are on Our Website www.fearringtoncares.org.

    Occasionally Zoom program IDs and passwords will change; if you have saved a link it may eventually become inactive. Use the links on our website for a quick, current connection to all Zoom programs. If you would like to practice a Zoom connection and meeting, email info@fearringtoncares.org and we will set that up.

     

     

    Join Movement Classes via Zoom
    www.fearringtoncares.org

    All classes 11:30 am

    No classes after December 18.

    Mondays—Chair Yoga

    Wednesdays—Otago Fall-Prevention Exercises

    Join Support Groups via Zoom
    www.fearringtoncares.org

    Caregiver's Support Group:
    Wednesday, December 2 and 16, 12:30–2:00 pm

    Parkinson's Support Group:
    Wednesday, December 9, 3:30–4:30 pm. (New
    members can contact Jan Cope-Kasten
    (jcopekasten@gmail.com) or Karen Metzguer
    (karen@fearringtoncares.org) for information.)

    Living with Chronic Conditions:
    Thursday, December 3 and 17, 11:00 am–12:30
    pm (new time).

    Living with Loss Around the Holidays:
    Thursday, December 3 and 17, 1:00–2:30 pm

     

     

    A Note from Karen Metzguer, RN, Nurse and Executive Director

    The Heart of Fearrington Village

    We can't and never have been able to do it without YOU. The work of Fearrington Cares is funded 100% by Villagers, current and past. Not only are you and your neighbors volunteers for this organization, you have shared your financial resources for 30 years of service to the community. This final appeal for a contribution in 2020 comes with the immense gratitude I feel for the privilege of serving as your Nurse and Executive Director.

    You may be surprised to learn the multiple ways we are able to receive financial support in addition to a check or a donation by credit card on our website (https://fearringtoncares.org/donate/):

     Donation of appreciated stock.
     Donation of proceeds from a vehicle sale.
     Matching donation from an employer/previous employer.
     Donation in honor of a service provided by one of our volunteers.
     Donation in memory of a friend or family member who has died.
     Donation of the proceeds of an estate sale.
     Donation at the time of death through a will.
     Donation through a trust fund or foundation.

    Our programs and services continue to make a difference in this community. We hear regularly from individuals who are incredibly grateful for our education programs and movement classes, and who have been moved by the humor, warmth, and compassion of our volunteers.

    We are grateful to each of you who have contributed and ask those of you who have not to consider joining your neighbors who are passionate about Fearrington Cares programs and services. Please make a donation before the end of the year. Fearrington Cares is a 501(c)3 organization.

     

     

    Support for Caregivers Workshop

    Do you care for someone with memory loss and live in a rural area? If so, you may to eligible to participate in a free six-week long online workshop offered by researchers at the University of California, San Francisco.

    If you are a caregiver living in a rural area, care for someone with memory loss, are 18 years of age or older, and provide care for at least ten hours per week, you may qualify. Participants will receive a small cash stipend for completing four study surveys on their caregiving experiences. The study offers a free online workshop, caregiver handbook, and support from trained staff and other caregivers. Go to https://caregiverproject.ucsf.edu or call toll-free 1-833-634-0603 for more information.

     

     

    Remember AmazonSmile When Shopping!

    During this season of gift giving, many of you shop at Amazon. Fearrington Cares has registered with AmazonSmile so that if you shop at Amazon, you can choose to have AmazonSmile donate 0.5% of your eligible purchases to us at no additional cost to you. Just shop at https://smile.amazon.com/ and designate Fearrington Cares as your charity of choice. When first visiting AmazonSmile, customers are prompted to select a charitable organization from almost one million eligible organizations. Then shop as usual and benefit Fearrington Cares at the same time!

     

     

    Covid-19 Information

    Fearrington Cares maintains a web site with county, state, and national information about the pandemic and the virus: fearringtoncares.org/resources/covid-19-coronavirus-current-information/.

     


     

    Fearrington Directory Changes

    Welcome to Our New Residents!

    The following persons have been added to the Fearrington Village Directory between October 15 and November 14:

    NameAddressContact Information
    Beth and Ron GOLD 32 Caswell (1183) Beth's Email: bethgold3@gmail.com
    Ron's Email: goldron@gmail.com
    Beth's Cell: 757-353-1726
    Ron's Cell: 757-353-9284
    Tina S. HOWELL 4119 The Knolls Close Home: thowell@littleonline.com
    Home: 919-704-8860
    Tina's Cell: 704-287-5971
    Karen ISAACS and Brian WONG  1372 Bradford Place Karen's Email: kisaacspittsboro@gmail.com
    Karen's Cell: 919-270-5039
    Brian's Email: bwong656@gmail.com
    Brian's Cell: 919-656-6786
    John B. and Mary (Bunny) LANCASTER 689 Spindlewood  John's Email: johnlancaster50@yahoo.com
    Bunny's Email: bunlancaster@yahoo.com
    John's Cell: 859-537-2205
    Bunny's Cell: 859-321-9810
    Kirstine (Tine) LINDEMANN
    George MALACINSKI
    907 Ashton  Tine's Email: Kirstinelindemann15@gmail.com
    George's Email: Malacins@indiana.edu
    Home: 919-704-8375
    Tine's Cell: 812-272-2381 
    Bill and Robin PICKARD 437 Crossvine Close  Bill's Email: billpick55@gmail.com
    Robin's Email: robinpickard@outlook.com
    Bill's Cell: 919-771-7149
    Robin's Cell: 919-576-6536 
    Edwin and Judith J. POULSON 14 East Madison (1039)  Judith's Email: judy.poulson@gmail.com
    Edwin's Cell: 803-900-1347
    Judith's Cell: 803-427-6724 
    Chris L. ROBERTS  174 Wintersage  Home: 919-724-5371 

     

    Are you a new resident? Be sure to register on our FHA community website. Doing so will give you full access to website features and allow you to be added to our resident directory. Log on to FearringtonFHA.org and on the top menu click on “Directory.” Then, in the drop-down menus click first on “New Resident” then “List Me in the Directory.”

    Are you an existing resident whose contact information has changed? Don’t forget to update your listing on the FearringtonFHA.org web site. On the landing page, click on the Directory tab on the top menu and then on Update Preferences on the drop-down menu. When you update your contact information online, the updates will be included in the FHA Directory & Handbook printed in January each year. Stay in touch with your fellow residents by keeping your contact information current.

    Notice anything missing in this issue of the newsletter? If not, that’s good. We were wondering if readers would even notice. What’s missing is the Changes to the Directory content we printed each month listing new and updated contact information for existing residents. We have decided to omit this feature going forward. These updates are easily found in your FearringtonFHA.org online directory regularly maintained by a FHA volunteer. An added benefit? Your newsletter staff can use the space for information, articles and photos readers can’t get elsewhere. We hope you agree with our decision.

     

     

    Pinecones

    Calendar for December 2020

    Fearrington Village clubs and groups will be meeting on these dates. Events are usually held at The Gathering Place unless stated otherwise. However, The Gathering Place is currently closed due to Covid-19 restrictions. Therefore, if you have questions, be sure to check with the person or web page listed in the “Contact” column for the most up-to-date information.

    Day/Date/TimeOrganizationEventContact
    Tuesday December 1
    All day
    Women of Fearrington Toy Drive Deadline Kate West
    713-203-1358
    Tuesday December 8
    9 am-1 pm
    Women of Fearrington Holiday Bakery and Market Jo Bolig
    919-542-0780
    Tuesday December 8
    3:00 pm
    Fearrington Genealogy Group Zoom Teleconference Linda Grimm
    919-533-6296
    Friday December 11
    9:30 am
    Bulls and Bears
    Investment Club
    Club Meeting via Zoom Anna Shearer
    703-217-0322
    ashearer1219@gmail.com

     

     

     
  • FHA Newsletter: December 2021

    fearrington NL logo

    FEARRINGTON  HOMEOWNERS  ASSOCIATION  NEWSLETTER
    December 2021        Volume 40        Number 11

     

    President's Message

    Rose

    We have all heard the saying “It takes a Village to Raise a Child.” Since being elected to serve as your President of the FHA, I just keep thinking that “It takes a Village to run a Village.”

    Our Village is now 45 years old. As we all know, as we age things start to break down, and we need to work a little harder to keep everything running smoothly. We are unique because our developer, Fitch Creations, is still building homes here and owns and manages the Village Center, Camden (or Jenny’s) Park, the pastures and farm animals, as well as a lot of additional property. We also have numerous service groups, who help govern their part of the community, although over 400 homes do not have a separate service group. This can all be very confusing for residents, who often do not know who to call when they see something that needs to be addressed. Moreover, due at least in part to the pandemic, there has been more turnover of existing homes than usual, and a greater number of new homes have been built as well. So let me extend a warm welcome to all the new residents who may not have gotten to really experience Village life given all the concerns about Covid-19.

    Having served two years as your Vice-President, I learned first-hand that our community is an amazing place to live, but it takes effort to keep it that way. I was fortunate to serve with nine other wonderful individuals who took their duties very seriously and spent many hours fulfilling the tasks assigned to them as Board members. I was also fortunate to serve with great volunteers on our Long-Range Planning Committee, our Nominating Committee, and our Wastewater Task Force. Many other volunteers have helped the community by managing our website, scheduling events at The Gathering Place, organizing our Food Trucks, helping others through Fearrington Cares, and on and on and on. Heartfelt thanks to so many who work behind the scenes to make our Village the best.

    As the incoming President, I do have some goals for the year ahead. First and foremost, I want the Board to figure out how we can implement many of the ideas that were identified through the community survey. I am also hopeful that we can address our covenants issues. Every home in Fearrington is part of the FHA, but the covenants for each phase are just a little different from one another. Moreover, a lot has changed since the original document was written in the 70’s. My hope is to have one streamlined set of FHA covenants (the service groups will still have their own). We have formed a committee and retained a lawyer to assist us, but we could use more people to work on this endeavor. In addition, given all the development that is going on around us, I would love to see a group of residents come together to stay on top of the land use issues that may affect us all, particularly given the inadequate roads in our area and the lack of other infrastructure. I also want to strengthen the relationship between the FHA Board and the Service Group boards as well as with Fitch Creations. In other words, lots and lots to do.

    The new website will go live soon. It should make it much easier to find out what’s going on in the Village and to volunteer. I hope to be able to meet many of you in person in the months ahead. In the meantime, let me wish all of you the Happiest of Holidays!


     

     

    From Our FHA Board

     

    Fearrington Preserve Update: A Partial Victory 

    On Monday evening, November 15, the Board of Commissioners discussed the application from the developers of Fearrington Preserve (Congruus LLC) to add 184 acres of land that they own to the 2017 Land Use Map that outlined the area suitable for development under the Compact Community Ordinance (CCO).

    I testified during the public input part of the meeting against the request, as did several others from Fearrington Village and Briar Chapel. Following a presentation by the applicant, Planning Board member George Lucier explained why that body had voted (8 – 3) to deny the request.

    After a somewhat heated discussion, Commissioner Jim Crawford made a motion to approve the request. The Chair of the Board, Mike Dasher, asked for a second, and hearing none, made the second himself. The motion actually failed on a 3 – 2 vote, with Diana Hales, Karen Howard and Franklin Gomez Flores voting against it.

    Unfortunately, our elation was short-lived. Since the motion to approve had failed, Karen Howard introduced a motion to deny the application. Diana Hales seconded, but this motion also failed, because Gomez Flores voted the other way.

    When no one seemed to know what this result meant, the County Attorney stated that the matter was still on the table. He suggested that the various parties hold discussions in the days ahead to understand what information the applicant needed to provide that might break the stand-off, one way or the other. Mr. Gomez Flores made it clear that, at the very least, he wanted to see a conceptual plan outlining what the applicant was planning to build and where.
    We do not know when this matter will come back before the Board of Commissioners. Hopefully, it will be after the holidays, but don’t bet on that. It was clear that all the comments received from the Planning Board, Fearrington residents, and others had a lot to do with the initial vote, but the eventual outcome of the meeting was very unusual, to say the least. We will do our best to keep you informed and let you know when it is time to make your voices heard again.

    —Rose Krasnow (president@fhaboard.org

     

    Important okTo Our Area and Block Contacts 

    Thanks to our area and block contacts who keep us connected! Through the efforts of several experienced contacts, we are re-booting the program to get back in gear after heroic efforts to keep going during Covid. Here is what you can expect sometime in 2022.

    1. Communications will be improved! We now have a contact group established in the FHA Board directory so that we can reach out with important information. If you have not already confirmed your continued interest in serving as a block or area contact, please do so by emailing your name and your area to community@fhaboard.org. We also plan to hold quarterly meetings to discuss issues and ideas. Hopefully, we can have these meetings in person soon.

    2. Training for contacts will be held. Vicki Field and Hilary Murray are in the process of developing the training which should be both informative and entertaining! We are targeting February for the roll-out.

    3. We are making efforts to work in tandem with other groups that welcome and orient newcomers. More on that topic as plans start coming together.

    4. More on communications. We hope to set up a chat site for all the contacts where we can informally share news and experiences.

    Finally, a reminder: Confirm your continued interest in serving as a contact by emailing your name and your area to community@fhaboard.org! And if you know of others who would like to fill this role, please encourage them to use the same email address to express their interests.

    —Pam Bailey, Director of Community Affairs (community@fhaboard.org

     

     

    ThinkingBuilding a Community with The Belted Gazette

    Stepping down from my position as Director of Communications, I reflect on two years’ experience with the FHA newsletter. Some major changes have taken place in that time. The most obvious is that it has become almost entirely an electronic medium. While many residents miss the paper copy, going electronic allowed us to expand the coverage significantly and include illustrations, while lowering the amount of your FHA dues devoted to printing it.

    The growth of the newsletter can be seen in greater coverage of issues addressed by the FHA Board and in the inclusion of illustrated feature articles providing interesting and informative coverage of life in and around Fearrington. It continues to provide space for clubs and other groups, and it incorporates the monthly newsletter of Fearrington Cares because most readers want that newsletter to be there. Providing the newsletter with a name of its own,The Belted Gazette, symbolizes its growing importance in village life.

    Credit for these changes goes first to a Board, led by President Carl Angel, that wanted to encourage better communication. The eventual success of the enterprise was entirely due to a new team of editors who have worked extraordinarily hard to produce an excellent newsletter.

    If I have any regrets, it is that I have disappointed a number of residents with my refusal to include in the newsletter articles expressing their pet peeves. I owe them an explanation, although not an apology.

    All of us see incidents that annoy us. Motorists complain about pedestrians walking or standing in the street. Pedestrians complain about motorists driving too fast. Some complain about people not wearing masks. Others complain about being required to wear masks. And everyone complains about dog owners failing to clean up their pets’ by-products. And a significant number of complainants demand that “something be put in the newsletter.”

    I have steadfastly refused to allow The Belted Gazette to become a vehicle for complaints. To explain why, I quote an article devoted to HOA newsletters:

    A newsletter that contains a long list of rules, warnings, and potential sanctions for violators will not build readership. Worse, it can undermine the development of a sense of community that the newsletter is trying to achieve.

    (Echo: Executive Council of Homeowners, Inc.)

    Expressed in a different way, it does no good—it does nothing to mitigate the behavior generating the complaint, and it can backfire.

    I could provide a long technical explanation with evidence for my claim. I’ll not subject you to it, although I’ll be happy to refer you to relevant sources if you ask. However, I’ll give a brief summary of why a complaint in a newsletter does little or nothing to modify the behavior in question. Feel free to skip this section. You will not be tested on it—unless you submit a complaint to be published.

    Thinking, Fast and Slow

    Some of you may recognize this as the title of a book by Daniel Kahneman describing a very influential theory of how people think. Briefly, when faced with a situation that demands a response, we can approach it in two ways. “Fast” thinking is rapid and automatic, based on innate predispositions and well-learned habits. “Slow” thinking is deliberate and careful; we use whatever we know that might be relevant. Because it is automatic, fast thinking is easy. Slow thinking is difficult and easily disrupted.

    Now consider the effect that reading he Belted Gazette has on your behavior. You read an article about why you should wear a mask, or you read that state law requires you to walk on the left facing traffic if there is no sidewalk. The article provides information you can think about, if and when you feel so inclined. However, it cannot have an effect on automatic habits you acquired over a lifetime. The information may change your slow thinking; it will not alter your fast thinking.

    Now look at the behavior that people are complaining about: walking (with or without the dog), driving, getting dressed, interacting with other people. All highly automatic. Where is your thinking directed as you engage in these behaviors? Probably towards anything other than the activity that annoys other people.

    I am as concerned as you are about the dangers inherent in walking, driving, and interacting with groups of other people. My point is that if you really want to do something about behaviors that trouble you, focus on approaches that might be successful. There are ways to modify automatic behavior, although it is not easy.

    Two approaches have been shown to work. One is to modify the situation so it elicits a different kind of automatic behavior from the one you are complaining about. The other is to adopt a long-term program to modify one especially important factor: the social norms that drive us all, i.e., the standards of behavior we take for granted.

    If well designed, the first method works immediately,. My favorite example is a method used by the City of Chicago for reducing accidents on a dangerous curve. In spite of warnings, flashing lights, and police cars, too many drivers took the curve too fast. The solution was to paint a series of white lines across the road, the gap between the lines becoming smaller as they approached the curve. This gave drivers the sense that they were driving faster and faster. Automatically, they slowed down.

    Method two uses the idea that every message contains, somewhere, a reference to norms. A long series of complaints makes people think many or most residents behave this way. In fact, of course, Fearrington is one of the safest places to live in the country. Use this fact! The message should not be, “All these awful drivers”; it should be “In Fearrington, we drive carefully.”

    Try it; you’ll like it. And The Belted Gazette will make for more enjoyable reading.

    —Gordon Pitz

     

     

    FHA Board Election ResultsI voted

    At the annual meeting of the FHA on November 21, 2021, Fearrington Village residents elected a new FHA President and three new FHA Board members. Rose Krasnow, previously serving as Vice President, was elected President, succeeding Carl Angel who will be stepping down from the Board. Amy Ghiloni was elected to Rose’s former position of Vice President.

    Also stepping down from the Board are Jesse Fearrington, Director of Grounds and Landscaping, and Gordon Pitz, Director of Communications. Their newly elected successors are Zachary Traywick and Tony Carroll.

    The new directors will join the following currently serving members of the Board: Judy Graham, Secretary; Tony Daniels, Treasurer; Ric Frank, Director of Covenants; Pam Bailey, Director of Community Affairs; Mark Haslam, Director of Infrastructure and Facilities; and Warren Ort, Director of Health, Safety and Security. Directors are elected for two-year terms, which are staggered so that the terms of some Directors expire each year.

    Also elected at the Annual Meeting were two new members of the Nominating Committee, Steve Gambino and Stephen Stewart. The Nominating Committee is charged with identifying and recruiting future members of the Board.

     


     

    Features

     

     

     

    Scene Around Fearrington

    All Aboard the Fearrington Light Railway

    By Leslie Palmer

    This month's Scene Around Fearrington once again features a photographer's captured images. While Jim Coplan's photos are excellent, it is what he has created that will delight you.

    Jim Coplan SAF Low Res Web Copy

    Jim and Judy Coplan retired to Fearrington in 2016. Long before the move, Jim was already planning how to turn their back yard into a wonderland—a landscaped garden plus a garden railroad. Jim built most of the structures (which remain outdoors year-round) himself, including a grist mill inspired by the Sudbury (MA) Wayside Mill and a covered bridge based on a prototype in Contoocook, NH. Jim also built all of the railroad cars from scratch. Trains are pulled by diminutive engines that work the same way as full-size locomotives, burning fuel (camping gas) to raise steam. Plants adjacent to the tracks include dwarf specimens and low-lying groundcovers, creating the illusion of trains running through a miniature world of their own.

    Shortly after the railroad became operational, Jim began sharing his photos on Nextdoor (https://nextdoor.com/). He recently created a group on Nextdoor, Friends of the Fearrington Light Railway, where he shares his creations and the changing scenes in the garden. "My goal,” he posted, “is to spread a bit of good cheer and give everyone a little mental respite. Ordinarily, I would have visitors in person, but times being what they are, for now, we will all have to settle for ND as a platform for sharing. Someday I hope to host guests again." You can also see videos on YouTube (for example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=owzvRbX8Rl8) or search for “Fearrington Light Railway.”

    Jim grew up in Natick, Massachusetts. He is a retired pediatrician who specialized in working with children with developmental disabilities (www.drcoplan.com). His wife, Judy, is retired from a career in pediatric physical therapy. She is very tolerant of Jim’s activities, and one year gifted him with a sign that hangs over his workbench: “Still plays with trains.”

    jcoplan48@comcast.net

     

    Chatham Artist Guild LogoChatham Artists Guild Studio Tour

    By Leslie Palmer

    The 29th Annual Chatham Artists Guild Studio Tour will welcome visitors into member artists’ studios on December 4th and 5th and on December 11th and 12th. Fifty-four members of the Guild will offer original works of art, including paintings, sculpture, pottery, photography, glass, wood, jewelry, and digital and fabric art. The Tour is self-guided, allowing for a relaxing drive through Chatham County’s rolling hills and pastoral farmlands. Visitors can use the map provided in the Tour brochure, which can be found in the November/December issue of Chatham Magazine, in local shops, or online at ChathamStudioTour.org.

    Eight Fearrington artists will welcome you into their studios:

    Studio # 20 Lee Kazanas 57 Stone Ledge 518-524-1323

    Stoneware and porcelain pottery plus garden sculptures

    Lee has been a Studio Potter for over 40 years, working primarily in functional high-fired stoneware and porcelain. His work has been featured in dozens of gallery shows, primarily on the East Coast. For many years, he owned and operated a regional craft gallery in the Adirondack mountains of Northern New York. https://chathamartistsguild.org/artists/lee-kazanas/

    Studio # 21 Leslie Palmer 110 Creekwood 919-929-9268

    Drawings, watercolor & mixed media paintings, giclée prints

    Leslie's drawings and watercolor and mixed media paintings present images of layered color, understated texture, and subtle brush movements. This visual poetry speaks directly in the language of the soul, emotions…of intuition. Her desire is to encourage reflection, quiet contemplation—a respite from life’s chatter. lesliepalmerfineart.com

    Studio # 21 Karen West Tour Only: 110 Creekwood 919-457-8090

    Home Studio, by appointment only: 923 Woodham

    Oil paintings and prints inspired by diverse subjects

    Karen began painting while an attorney engaged in international development finance. As a result, several of her paintings capture universal emotions—joy, wonder, dedication, defiance. She also paints landscapes, still life paintings, and animals in their habitats. KarenWestgallery.com

    Studio # 22 Lani Chaves 167 Wintersage 919-414-6003

    Light-filled watercolors inspired by nature, giclée prints, greeting cards

    Lani's watercolor paintings reflect her goal to be completely open to all styles and every kind of subject matter. Her aim is to discover the essence of what she is painting. In her studio, you will find framed and unframed original watercolors of all sizes plus a small selection of greeting cards and notecards. LaniChaves.com

    Studio # 23 Forrest C. Greenslade, Ph.D. 149 Tinderwood 919-545-9743

    Nature-inspired paintings and sculpture

    Forrest was that kid you could always find turning over rocks in streams, looking for what wonders nature would disclose. This curiosity about the natural world led him to a serious life as a scientist and organizational executive. Now in retirement, Forrest is again doing what he did in grammar school—turning over rocks and sculpting and painting the wonders that nature discloses. organicforrestry.com/

    Studio # 24 Eric Saunders 485 Beechmast 919-533-3030

    Photography—outdoor landscapes and architecture, natural and urban

    Eric's preferred subject matter is pieces of outdoor landscapes and architecture, natural and urban. He sometimes uses digital manipulation of images. His work is oriented to “seeing” effective abstract compositions and communicating these compositions using whatever technical control is appropriate. hga-store.square.site/shop/eric-saunders/14

    Studio # 26 Vidabeth Bensen 601 Stoneview 804-833-1401

    Original hand-printed cards, t-shirts, framed and unframed prints, calendars

    Vidabeth's hand-pulled, original screen prints are created using stencils from hand-cut film, paper, or painted directly on the screen with drawing fluid and screen filler. Some of her work is printed on handmade paper and then collaged onto stretched canvas. Vidabeth's recent work has taken a turn away from “edition prints” using more realistic subject matter toward “abstractions.” houseoflifeprints.com

    Studio # 26 Minnie C. Gallman Tour Only: 601 Stoneview 919-533-6616

    Home Studio, by appointment only: 22 Speyside Circle

    Photography and note cards depicting nature and eclectic subjects

    Minnie's photography is a creative outlet that encourages her to look at the world in a different way. While she enjoys photographing a variety of subjects—architecture, abstracts, people, boats, monuments, and old cars, her primary interest is nature photography. All her photos are printed on archival paper using archival inks. Minnie-Gallman.pixels.com

     

     

    Kindness, Pie, & a Strong Sense of Community

    By Deborah Repplier

    When you think about it, Fearrington Village is very eclectic, particularly in terms of neighborhood sections. Each neighborhood boasts its own unique character and charm, yet perhaps none more so than the OG—that is, the original section known as the “Historic District,” which covers Phases I – IV. The very first of these homes (a model house built on Benchmark) dates back to 1976, with the more recent houses being built in the mid-80s.

    Architecture-wise, these homes retain a similar look and feel, with all being single-family dwellings offering a mix of one and two levels on wooded lots with sun-dappled trees. Some houses include garages. Many feature courtyards and screened porches. Property size runs from just under a half-acre to up to two or three. Where the diversity comes in is in the residents themselves. While much of Fearrington Village skews toward older adults with a median age of 72, the Historic District is home to all ages really, including a number of younger families with children.

    Lucy and Sam Grist currently live in Phase I. They’ve sought out Fearrington Village twice as their home in the past 30 years. Lucy tells me, “We love the eclectic and maybe even eccentric elements of the Historic District. Nothing cookie-cutter about it, and the people who choose to live here are the same. We have neighbors in all ages and stages of life. It is so interesting to meet our neighbors. We moved in July of 2020 during the pandemic, and while we had met so many nice people in the neighborhood while just out walking, we were not aware of any neighborhood events where we could gather for fellowship. We wanted to bring our neighbors together just for the fun of it.”

    PieBald the inspiration for the Pie Parties

    The magnificent Piebald deer that inspired our Pie Parties
    Photo by Lucy Grist

    The desire for fellowship is integral to both Lucy and Sam, perhaps stemming from Sam’s work as a Methodist pastor. While contemplating ideas for how they might inspire community to come together, they crossed paths while out walking with the elusive Piebald deer—a creature that has patches of white across the body due to genetic variations. Lucy was so wowed by this magnificent animal so rarely seen in the Village that it made perfect sense for the Piebald to become a mascot. And thus the idea of the Pie Party was born.

    Party goers Grady Morrison

    Party goers Grady Morrison & Betty Forbes enjoy the company & the pie.
    Photo by Deborah Repplier

    Yet while Lucy and Sam were the initiators of these neighborhood gatherings, folks have certainly stepped up to contribute, to weigh in on dates and times and frequency (Friday nights, quarterly)—and even to donate art, as one such gathering included an art swap. Turnouts have been a huge success. There’s currently a Nextdoor group called Historic District of FV Neighbors, where discussions about Pie Parties, pie recipes, and other things not even related to pie take place. Lynn Ferguson points out that the Pie Parties have been a “good place to meet new neighbors and to learn of all the ways to make special pies.” 

    Mary Ted play for pie

    Mary Charlton & Ted Ehrhard playing for pie
    Photo by Lucy Grist

    The Pie Parties have been held at the bottom of Benchmark, next to the playground, picnic tables, and tennis courts. Participants have been varied, especially by age, and the events lots of fun. Musicians have volunteered to perform for pie. Kids play on the swings and run around racing and chasing. Well-behaved dogs on leash with tails wagging and eyes ever watchful for tidbits to drop meet and greet fellow dogs and humans alike. And the pie—oh my, the pie! There has been such a mix of platters appearing on the tables—and many liberal interpretations at that. From the most exquisite looking and tasting homemade endeavors (I’m thinking of Zora Maynard’s pear tarte—equally as eloquent as it was tasty!) to home-baked veggie quiches to store-bought apple pie to takeout pizza pie! And of course, there’s Grady Morrison’s now somewhat famous, highly requested chicken pie.

    So many yummy pies to choose from

    So many yummy pies to choose from
    Photo by Deborah Repplier

    At the first gathering, there was a posterboard of a large map of the USA, and neighbors were asked to place a pin and write in the margins where they were from. Perhaps no surprise, people came from all over the country, some even born internationally—yet one thing they all shared: everyone feels happy to be living in Fearrington Village at this point in time! JoAnne Davis comments about the Pie Parties, “It’s been such fun, a nice way to meet neighbors and make them friends. I’ve been here almost 10 years and have not met so many neighbors in one place!”

    Fearrington Village residents come from all over the country and beyond

    Fearrington Village residents come from all over the country and beyond
    Photo by Lucy Grist

    So far, there have been three Pie Parties with plans for a fourth sometime in early 2022, hopefully indoors at a south-of-Village-Way location. One day, we hope that Mister Fitch might come by. While the theme has and will continue to be “pie,” it’s not really just about pie, of course. These gatherings are a way for newcomers and old-timers alike to meet new friends. As Lucy explains, Pie Parties “offer people an authentic experience that is unpretentious and real, where they can let their hair down, visit intergenerationally, and, as we say in church ‘love on one another.’”

    You’ll find more photos of Pie Parties and news about upcoming gatherings when on the Nextdoor group. This group was created primarily for the Historic District residents, but in the spirit of community and hospitality, all are welcome—especially if you love pie!

    Originally from Massachusetts, Deborah Repplier moved to Chatham County in 2007—for the past 3.5 years, she’s called the Historic District of Fearrington Village home. More often than not, you can find her walking the trails with her two Standard Poodles.

     

     

    A Change in the Weatherbend

    By Tad McArdle

    Rick & Sally Osmer

    Rick & Sally Osmer
    Photo by Tad McArdle

    If you are among the many who have noticed some beautiful landscape changes along the north side of Village Way between Windstone and Beechmast, credit goes to Rick and Sally Osmer. The Osmers moved to Fearrington in the summer of 2019, just before Covid hit, and pretty quickly got to work on the large wooded area that came with the house, with a back yard that widens dramatically as it approaches the Way. According to Rick, “We didn’t look for a place just in Fearrington; we had heard of Fearrington, but it was the house that attracted us. And now, as we learn more and more about this community, we tell ourselves ’We were so lucky we bought a house out here.’ We didn’t really know what a gift this village was. We just wanted a one-floor house so we could age in place as long as possible. And we really liked the house immediately. We had done a lot of gardening work on our yard in Princeton, so during the pre-vaccine Covid scare when people our age were very cautious about going out, we spent that time working on our property.”

    Rick and Sally are ordained ministers who both served churches in their early years together. After attending Harvard Divinity School, Rick and Sally earned their Master of Divinity degrees at Yale. Then Rick earned a Ph.D. in Theology from Emory University. After Rick accepted an appointment as the Ralph B. and Helen S. Ashenfelter Professor of Mission and Evangelism at Princeton in 1990, Sally’s ministry turned to managing non-profits to help underprivileged people including serving for a time as director of The Crisis Ministry, a large food pantry in central New Jersey. While Rick was teaching at Princeton, they built a house outside of Waynesville, NC, on the side of a mountain with “a bunch of good friends who lived in that area,” says Rick. “We always thought we would live there. But the problem was, we were 10 or 15 years younger than a lot of the people there, so when we reached retirement age, many of them had died or moved into care units. It’s not that easy to live on a mountainside. So we decided we would move closer to our daughter and our grandchildren, and you can see evidences of that scattered through the yard.”

    Front_Garden

    Front Garden with Hellebores
    Photo by Tad McArdle

    Sally said, “We started in the front yard, clearing out a bunch of tree stumps and stinky mushrooms, and ended up with a nice rock garden, with lots of hellebores, some of which we transplanted to the bird garden in back. Our son gave us two Japanese Maples.”

    View_Toward_Village_Way

    Slope from Village Way with Erosion Mitigation Plantings
    Photo by Tad McArdle

    According to Rick, one of the reasons they planted evergreens in the back yard was for privacy since they didn’t have screens on the bedroom when they first arrived. With a somewhat oddly shaped back yard sloping down toward the creek, erosion was a factor to cope with. “We were kind of driven to the planting. A lot of the water, even from up towards the Village, runs down. Some erosion was taking place, and so we had to do some stuff immediately. We built a baby rock wall, and I dug a little thing right behind it. Our next-door neighbor Dan Soileau has all kinds of equipment and knowledge. He’s been fabulous, has even done some things to his yard to help us out. So, we did that and then started planting stuff here to hold the dirt. The latest thing we’ve done is to build a little rock garden—we call it the bird gardenwhich is the final thing we built. That was over really leached-out soil, and last winter we planted some rye grass.”

    Rock_Garden

    Rock Garden
    Photo by Tad McArdle

    The creek area was totally covered with wisteria when they moved in. They had it bulldozed and covered in wood chips to keep the wisteria from coming back and to hold the bank in place. “We planted nandina and woodland holly bushes,” said Sally, “but they needed more sun, so we transplanted them. For the weeping cherry tree to turn red, we’ll have to wait till spring.”

    Moss_Path

    Moss Path
    Photo by Tad McArdle

    Rick and Sally have names for several of the yard’s intriguing features. Here is what they call their “moss path,” which started itself, moss being less critical of soil quality than most grasses. They have planted some winter grass, but it hasn’t come up yet, according to Sally. She is eager for the winter grass to get going and make the unplanted area prettier.

    Protective Fencing

    Protective Fencing
    Photo by Tad McArdle

    They have had to install some protective fencing around some of their recent plantings because the superabundant Fearrington deer have been rubbing their antlers against the tree trunks to get rid of their summertime velvety covering containing a form of insulin that aids antler growth.

    “The greatest thing about all this,” says Rick, “is that so many people stop and talk to us; they even stop their cars. You wouldn’t believe the number of people who stop by and say ‘You’re working so hard, you’re doing a great job.’”

    The Osmers are fortunate to have found Fearrington, and Fearrington is no doubt happy to add these two thinkers and doers to its population. I once read of someone who dreamed that an entire army of theologians had appeared over the horizon, headed in his direction (can’t recall why). Considering the theologians I have met in Fearrington, including Rick and Sally Osmer, if that admittedly unlikely event should happen to me in real life, I would just grin and get my welcome wagon ready (“Coffee? Tea? So what’s it all about?”).

    A native of rural western Pennsylvania, Tad McArdle has lived in Fearrington since 2010 and lives happily with his wife, Mary Roodkowsky, on North Langdon. Tad’s interests include writing, golf, the poetry of Emily Dickinson and Wallace Stevens, physical fitness, Latin and African percussion, and providing quick and simple solutions to the major problems facing humanity (any suggestions?).

     

    old time food truckMore Food Trucks to Deliver Diverse and Delicious Takeout Dining

    We continue to welcome visiting food trucks to the Gathering Place for your takeout dining pleasure. The growing diversity of vendors brings street food favorites from around the world conveniently to our neighborhood. The full schedule along with menus is always posted on our community hotspot page at www.streetfoodfinder.com/fearringtonvillage where you can sign up for a weekly email and also leave feedback for the vendors.

    For the month of December, our schedule is as follows:

    December 8 - Cousins Maine Lobster
    December 22 - The Blue Window
    December 29 - Chirba Chirba Dumpling

    Online ordering is available through the hotspot page and most vendors begin accepting pre-orders the day before their arrival with one notable exception—Cousins Maine Lobster. To pre-order their lobster specialties, you must use their special app which is available from the App Store and Google Play. Also note that Cousins does not begin accepting orders until 3 pm on the day of their arrival. Additionally, keep in mind that all food trucks welcome walk-up orders, so please don’t be discouraged by technology or pre-order time slots being filled.

    As we continue to enjoy this convenient and appetizing amenity in our community, please remember that food truck fare is not permitted in the Village Center. Kindly pick up your meal and let your taste buds travel afar while you dine at home.

     

    Fearrington Puzzler96webThis Month's Puzzler

     

    Question: In the March issue of The Belted Gazette, Tad McArdle introduced us to CORA, the acronym for Chatham Outreach Alliance. As the Chatham Outreach Alliance prepares for the upcoming holiday season, this month’s puzzler asks: From what two languages could the name Cora derive and what are the meanings of those words?

     

    Answer to November Puzzler:

    Fossil_Tree

    Dawn Redwood: Fossil Tree in Fearrington Village
    Photo by Carol Kurtz

    Question: Where are fossil trees located in Fearrington Village and what is their common name?

    Answer: Metasequoia glyptostroboides is a mouthful, but the common name “Dawn Redwood” runs easily off the lips. This fossil tree can be found at the edge of the south pond in Jenny’s Park (aka Camden Park), along the edge of the pond at Village Way and East Camden and in Creekwood Path areas where they were planted by the Arbor Day Committee. At one time, this tree was known only in the fossil record and was believed to be extinct for millions of years. In the 1940s, an unlikely discovery of living specimens in a remote area of China prompted the collection of seeds. Since the climate and soil parameters were unknown for the tree, seeds were sent to a diversity of locations. Fortunately, the fossil tree is adaptive to a variety of zones and soils. In the spring, the flat leaves which resemble needles are soft as a feather. Now in the fall, the tree will turn a beautiful bronze color.

     

     


     

    Announcements

     

    Fearrington Groups and Organizations

     

    Fearrington Dem Club SmFearrington Democratic Club

    The Democratic Club’s Zoominar topic on December 7 at 7 pm will be “The State of LGBTQ+ Policy in North Carolina." It’s not just a talk about bathrooms! Rather, our speaker, Mr. J. Sailor Jones, will look back and ahead on state and local policy impacting North Carolina's LGBTQ+ community. Mr. Jones is the Communications Director for the Southern Coalition for Social Justice and an LGBTQ+ rights advocate.

    To register and get the Zoom link, please use this link. This event will also be recorded and posted on the Club’s website: Fearrington Democratic Club - Welcome Page (fearringtondems.org).

     

     

    Fearrington Duplicate Bridge Clubduplicate bridge

    “Play duplicate bridge. It’s the ultimate social game for thinkers.” Join us FIVE times in December to unlock those “little grey cells” as Poirot would say. We will play every Wednesday in December (December 1, 8, 15, 22, and 29) at 1 pm at The Gathering Place. First time is free. Cost for playing is $7; that pays for use of the room, an accredited ACBL director, hand records, and snacks. See you there! Any questions, please contact Valorie Zentil, vzentil@gmail.com.

     

     

    Fearrington Genealogy GroupFearrington Genealogy Group

    December 14th meeting cancelled. See you in January 2022!
    Happy Holidays!

     

     

    Fearrington Green Scenegreenscenebanner2

    The ongoing Covid-19 pandemic has given us all a profound lesson in "flexibility." Flexibility as in changing plans, often on relatively short notice, as information and conditions change around us. It is in that spirit and that reality that I write to inform fellow Green Scene participants that our previously discussed topic for our December 8 meeting—Fran DiGiano's presentation, "What's in Your Water?"—is now going to take place in January. Date and time to be determined.

    Our meeting in the large room of The Gathering Place at 11:00 am on Wednesday, December 8, will now feature a presentation by Shannon Culpepper, Recycling & Education Specialist, Chatham County Solid Waste & Recycling. Shannon will bring us up-to-date on the ever-evolving details of what is and is not recyclable in our community waste stream. Rules are constantly being recast as recycling processing technology advances. Come join us for an informative hour of "talking trash."

    —Jason Welsch, Moderator, Cell Phone: 914-806-4852

     

     

    FVS logoFearrington Village Singers

    Men rehearse together on Thursdays beginning on January 6 at The Gathering Place at 4:00 pm. Men’s sectional rehearsals are on Mondays. Women rehearse together on Mondays starting January 10 at The Gathering Place at 4:00 pm—with sectionals on Thursdays. New singers are welcome. No audition is required, but we do require that you be fully vaccinated against Covid-19. For more information, contact FVS co-president Kathryn Doster at kathryn.j.doster@gmail.com.

     

     

    Fearrington Yacht Clubfyc200

    Ahoy, Mates! Our ship is sailing again, and our first port of call is a “Happy Hour Mixer” for current and former members and for residents who might like to join. The mixer will be Friday, January 21 from 4-6 pm at The Gathering Place. Although the annual $15 per person membership dues are usually required for participation in FYC events, they are NOT necessary for this occasion. Membership applications will be available at the mixer, along with news about upcoming events. The FYC is a party and travel club which usually has two parties and two regional trips a year planned by members. NO YACHT REQUIRED! For event information and membership form, log onto the FYC page at: https://group.fearringtonfha.org?yacht. And click on the FYC logo or, contact Commodore Maggie Tunstall at 919-542-0031 or metunstall@nc.rr.com.

     

     

    United Way Give Where You LiveUnited Way Campaign Continues at Fearrington Village

    The Fearrington Village United Way campaign is underway, and we are excited to report 34% progress toward our campaign goal of $83,000! A total of $28,422 has been raised to date.

    As a reminder, the Fearrington Village Campaign has been separated from the Galloway Ridge Campaign this year. This will allow for both residential areas to be recognized in the broader community for supporting our local United Way.

    United Way supports hungry children and families and Chatham residents who are struggling with homelessness, senior isolation, or accessing healthcare. Will you please help United Way meet these urgent needs in our community?

    Donate online at www.UnitedWayofChathamCounty.org/Donate. United Way will track your online donation and attribute your gift to the Fearrington Campaign using a multi-step form. This means that the online giving process happens over four steps on your screen. Step 1 is deciding the amount you’d like to give; Step 2 is inputting your personal information (address, phone number, etc.); Step 3 is noting additional details about your gift like which neighborhood you’d like it attributed to; and Step 4 is adding your credit card or electronic check information. If the United Way receives a donation without a neighborhood listed, they will use the mailing address to determine the location of the donor and credit the gift to the correct campaign.

    You can also mail a donation to PO Box 1066, Pittsboro, NC 27312, or call the United Way office at 919-542-1110 to make a gift over the phone.

     

     

    Women of FearringtonWOF CMYK Oval

    Our Holiday Bakery & Market will be held Tuesday, December 7, 10 am–noon, at The Gathering Place. Baked goods, handicrafts, and more! All proceeds aid our grants program. You may order ahead until December 3 here. Curbside pickup is available for those who prefer it. All who come in should be fully vaccinated and masked.

    All women new to Fearrington or Galloway Ridge and interested in learning about the Village and meeting other newcomers are invited to attend a "Welcome to Fearrington" coffee. Currently we are adding names for early spring outdoor coffees, or possibly earlier, weather permitting. Contact Jan Cope-Kasten, 920-573-2910.

    Don’t forget to renew your membership if you haven't done so already. We always appreciate your support. Click here for a membership form.

    Please visit www.womenoffearrington.org for up-to-date information and registration forms. All our events are subject to government guidelines for health and safety.

     

     

    Chatham County Agencies

    Chatham ConnectingChatham Connecting logo

    Bringing together those who need help with those who can help.

    December! It's high season for visiting with family and friends, gift-giving, and counting our blessings. It is also the time when many Chatham County Social Service and non-profit organizations look to your support for children, the elderly, and families in need. You can find a list of over 100 of these organizations at the Chatham Connecting website, www.chathamconnecting.org/ . A special Holiday Wishes button makes it easy to navigate Chatham Social Services' two programs, Christmas Wishes and Christmas Dreams, as well as other non-profits’ holiday wishes programs. Christmas Wishes provides holiday gifts for children in foster care and/or receiving services through the child welfare system. For details about participation in the program, please call 919-726-6270 and leave a message with your name & contact number, or email donate2christmaswishes@gmail.com. Christmas Dreams helps disabled adults and other elderly in need; holidays are an especially stressful time for many of these adults. If you would like to donate with gift certificates or personal care items, please email chathamchristmasdreams@gmail.com or call 919-714-9392. Finally, CORA, a Chatham County food pantry which serves meals year-round, needs support during the holidays. Contact CORA at www.corafoodpantry.org. Thank you.

     

     

    Continuing Education Opportunities

    Shared Learning Association of Chapel Hill

    Get Ready!! Shared Learning Association of Chapel Hill is preparing for its 13-week 2022 winter semester of non-credit courses. The term runs from mid-January through mid-May. Classes will be held in a new location, Church of the Reconciliation at 110 N. Elliott Road in Chapel Hill. Classes will meet both in a classroom and online and will be conducted by eager member moderators who determine study topics based on their interests, travels, expertise, experiences, and curiosity. A modest membership fee entitles members to take as many courses as they wish. The Winter 2022 Catalog includes a registration form with full course descriptions and schedule and will be available after the first of December at http://www.sharedlearning.us. To receive a paper copy, contact Alice Parsons, amparson@uci.edu, 919-642-0606.

     


    fcares logo

     

     

    Fearrington Cares Center Will Be Closed at End of Business on December 17 and Reopen on January 3.

     

    The Center may be closed for the holidays, but our volunteers will be busy providing transportation and handyperson services. If you need assistance with either of these areas of service, call the Center at 919-542-6877 and leave a message in the appropriate mailbox; a volunteer will be in touch. The general mailbox WILL NOT BE MONITORED; all messages left there will be retrieved when we reopen on Monday, January 3.

     

     

    Anticipating 2022 

    As the Director of Fearrington Cares, I have the privilege of working with a stellar staff and more than 200 generous volunteers. I see our staff and volunteers give 110% with open hearts and ready hands in service. This past year has been particularly difficult as we provided mostly virtual services. It is our sincere hope that 2022 will give us the opportunity to return to our normal efforts and to better them.

    There are signs of hope that, in 2022, we will be able to gather a bit more freely in public places. For sure COVID will be in our midst, but with more vaccinations (including boosters) and continued vigilance, we hope to see a drop in positive tests and a decline in hospitalizations. In the new year, Fearrington Cares plans to provide additional movement classes and additional small group seminars. We will also be piloting new ways to support caregivers among us. We are grateful for your continued support as we adjust our sails for the winds that may come.

    Please remember Fearrington Cares when you plan your end-of-year giving this Holiday Season. We exist to help all Fearrington residents enjoy better, less stressful lives. To do this we primarily depend on your generous (and tax deductible) contributions. We know that you have many important causes to choose from during this philanthropic season. Visit Fearrington Cares and learn how your donations are put to work supporting programs to help villagers thrive in Fearrington. Any donations at this time of year will help position us for a terrific year of continued service in 2022. For those who have contributed this year, you have our deep appreciation. Best wishes to all for happy and safe holiday celebrations and hopes for a great 2022.

     

     

    Continuing Series: Ethical Decision-Making at the End of Life

    The first two sessions in this four-part series explored the ethical and legal context for end-of-life decision-making, from foundational “right to choose” cases that brought bioethics into public awareness in the 1970s, to the present-day landscape related to medical aid in dying. In November, we used this background and encouraged participants to clarify and articulate their values about care at end of life. In this final session we will explore the range of available options for translating those values into purposeful advance care plans.

    Session 4: Helping Others Know and Honor Your Wishes

    Thursday, December 9, 7:00 pm (via Zoom)

    Deb Love, JD, MBA, MA (Bioethics), an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the UNC Department of Social Medicine will complete our series by discussing:

    • Advance directives and portable medical orders—benefits and limitations.
    • Voluntarily Stopping Eating and Drinking (VSED).
    • Dementia advance directives.
    • Differences between palliative care and hospice.
    • End-of-life doulas.

     

     

    Gift Wrapping Fun!

    Noon-2 pm, December 15, Fearrington Cares Center

    Would you enjoy some company while getting your holiday gifts wrapped this year? Bring ALL OF THEM and any paper you have and our Fearrington Cares elves will help you create masterpieces to share. Fully vaccinated individuals, please join us for a bit of holiday cheer!

     

     

    A Chance to Be an Angel

    Fearrington Cares is collecting new socks, underwear, warm hats, and children’s pajamas until December 15 at noon. Items for all ages, and especially children and teens, are welcome and will be used to help the agencies in Chatham County respond to immediate needs as winter approaches! Bring items to the Fearrington Cares Center and place in the box outside the door if the Center is closed. Not everyone reads the newsletter so please spread the word in your neighborhood and social groups.

     

     

     

    Movement Classes

    MondaysChair Yoga (Via Zoom; no class December 20, 27.)

    Wednesdays—Otago Fall-Prevention Exercises (Via Zoom; no class December 22, 29.)

    ThursdaysLine Dancing in person, attendees must be fully vaccinated. (At the Fearrington   Cares Center; no class December 23, 30.)

    Fridays —Rhythm Without the Blues. (Via Zoom; no class December 24, 31.)

    Join Support Groups Meeting in Person at the Fearrington Cares Center

    Alcoholics AnonymousEvery Monday, 10:00 am.(No meeting   December 20, 27.)

    Brainiacs Memory CaféEvery Wednesday, 10:00 am.(No meeting December 22, 29.)

    Parkinson’s GroupTuesday, December 7; 1:30-3:00 pm.

    Cancer Support Group:Tuesday, December 14; 1:30-3:00 pm.

    Health Services Offered at the Fearrington Cares Center

    (9:00 am—12:00 pm, Monday—Friday)

    Nurse Consultation:
    Walk-in clinic open for fully vaccinated residents. Appointment required for unvaccinated residents, call 919-542-6877.

    Foot ClinicThursday, December 9; appointment required, call 919-542-6877.

    Support Groups via Zoom

    www.fearringtoncares.org

     

    Caregiver Support GroupWednesdays, December 1, 15; 1:00 pm.

    Living with Chronic ConditionsThursdays, December 2, 16; 1:00 pm.

     

     

    Remember Amazon-Smile When Shopping!

    During this season of gift giving, many of you shop at Amazon. Fearrington Cares has registered with AmazonSmile so that if you shop there, you can choose to have AmazonSmile donate 0.5% of your eligible purchases to us at no additional cost to you. Just shop at smile.amazon.com and you will be prompted to select a charitable organization from almost one million eligible groups. Please choose Fearrington Cares as your charity of choice! Then shop as usual. Whenever you return to AmazonSmile, Fearrington Cares will automatically be your charity. We have received $472 this year from Amazon! Shop as needed and benefit Fearrington Cares at the same time!

     


     

    Beltie on a bench for emailweb96LPFearrington Directory Changes

    Welcome to Our New Residents!

    The following new villagers were added to the Fearrington Village Directory between October 15 and November 14.  Want to reach out to your new neighbor? You will find their contact information on our community web page: FearringtonFHA.org (click Find People under the Directory tab).

    Name Address
    Mary Bahr-Jones & Steve Jones  604 Stoneview 
     Lila Berry  4030 South McDowell
    Helen & Judith Bloomer  318 Baneberry Close
    George Thomas & Susan Mayhew (Susie) Devine   1322 Langdon Place
    Lily Grace 4114 The Knolls Close
    Glenn Gutsche & Janet Kolkebeck 4414 Richmond Close
    Eugene (Gene) & Hollingsworth (Holly) Hafer C-302 C Wing
    Sherry Henley & Ray Runyan 38 McDowell (1084)
    Mary Hoffman & Daphne Owings 8 Caswell (1138)
    Renuka Jain 646 Spindlewood
    Joyce Kline E-409 E Wing
    Charles Anthony & Laurette Lalonde Leprevost 278 Claymoor
    Ellen & Steven (Steve) Minden 4246 Henderson Place
    Mary Ellen (Mel) & Michael J. (Mike) Pasquale 10 West Madison (1133)
    Jack & Zachary Traywick 81 Creekwood
    Denise Wolf 595F Weathersfield

     

    Are you a new resident? To register your information in the Directory, please visit the FHA website at https://fearringtonfha.org From the top menu choose Directory, then, in the dropdown menu, select New Resident, and then List Me in the Directory. Fill in the resulting form with your information. 

    To obtain full access to website features, you must also create a website account (available only to residents or non-resident owners).  Return to the website’s homepage and find the words Login Form in the left column.  Click Create an account and follow the instructions.  You can read about the account activation process here.

    Are you an existing resident whose contact information has changed? Don’t forget to update your listing on the http://www.fearringtonfha.org website. On the landing page, click the Directory tab on the top menu and then choose Update Preferences in the dropdown menu. When you update your contact information online, the updates will be included in the Fearrington Village Directory & Handbook printed in January each year. Stay in touch with your fellow residents by keeping your contact information current.

     

     

     

    December 2021 CalendarFHA SnowGlobe

    Mask Requirement Continues:  Due to rising infections and the unvaccinated, individuals using The Gathering Place must wear a mask when inside the building whether or not they have been vaccinated. This is in keeping with CDC guidelines. If a club does not follow the rules, it will lose its use of the facility. Group leaders may decide whether to require their members to be vaccinated. Check the FHA web page for any updates to this policy.

    Coming in January 2022
    Day/Date/Time Organization Event Contact
     Friday
    December 3
    Women of Fearrington  Last day to
    pre-order for
    Holiday Bakery
    & Market 
    Jo Bolig
    919-542-0780 
     Tuesday
    December 7
    10 am – noon
     Women of Fearrington Holiday Bakery
    & Market
    The Gathering Place 
    Jo Bolig
    919-542-0780 
     Tuesday
    December 7
    7 pm
     Fearrington Democratic Club  Zoom Meeting Cheri DeRosia
    919-923-4506 cheri_derosia@hotmail.com 
     Meeting Weekly in December  
     Every Wednesday
    1 pm
     Duplicate Bridge Club Duplicate Bridge  Valorie Zentil
    vzentil@gmail.com
     Coming in January 2022
    Thursday
    January 6
    4 pm
    Fearrington Village Singers Men’s Spring
    Kick-Off Rehearsal
    Kathryn Doster kathryn.j.doster@gmail.com
    January 7, 21, and 26
    (See WoF website
    for times)
    Women of Fearrington Road Trips:
    Ackland Art Museum
    Mif Flaharty
    808-234-0008
    Monday
    January 10
    4 pm
    Fearrington Village Singers Women’s Spring Kick-Off Rehearsal Kathryn Doster
    kathryn.j.doster@gmail.com
    Wednesday
    January 19
    1:30 pm
    Women of Fearrington General Meeting
    Ackland Art Museum Program
    Adrienne Lallo
    512-619-1365

     


     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • FHA Newsletter: January 2021

    fearrington NL logo

    HOMEOWNERS’  ASSOCIATION  NEWSLETTER
    January 2021      Volume 40      Number 1

     

     

    President's Message

    Resolution

    “Learn from yesterday, live for today, and hope for tomorrow.” —Albert Einstein

    Well, by the time you read this, Santa will have come and gone for another year and the door to 2021 will be creaking open. Some folks will just see a long, dark corridor beyond the door. But wait, there appears to be bright light coming around the edges. The evidence seems clear; human ingenuity and adaptability will defeat the pandemic.

    As people have done in the past, many of us will make new year’s resolutions as one way of maintaining some control over the future. Most resolutions tend to lead to disappointment (and subsequent criticism if others know of them). If I make any, I keep them to myself so that I am the only critic, and I tend to give myself a lot of leeway. I am tempted to resolve to swear off every virtue, so that way I succeed when I fail.

    Our FHA team of board members and volunteers have done an excellent job in the year past, which presented many important and difficult challenges such as the wastewater management issue. There are always a multitude of challenges large and small and that team is always busy. For 2021, the team resolves to bring that same excellence to meeting its obligations which affect the values of all of us in our village.

    Unfortunately, we cannot keep that resolution to ourselves and give ourselves a lot of leeway. In fact, we constantly publish information in the newsletter or in webinars to let people know what the team is doing. That means all of us who live here can be critics. That is as it should be, after all, we are the FHA and the FHA is us. The team of board members and volunteers are drawn from the many talented people who live here. We have term limits, which ensures that as new members come on board, we maintain a broad and varied perspective.

    My term ends in November 2021, and my resolution is to let it end with no regrets. Like the old soldier of the ballad, I shall just fade away. I further resolve to write nine more of these presidential columns, even though that may elicit groans from many of you.

    What I suggest as a resolution for you all to consider is joining the FHA Team, which depends on volunteers in many, many roles. See the Volunteers Corner in this issue, and in subsequent months, for just a few of the many roles that need to be filled.


     

     

    Fearrington Homeowners’
    Association Newsletter

    The Newsletter is the official publication of our Fearrington Homeowners’ Association (FHA), produced by and for residents of Fearrington Village in Pittsboro, NC. The Newsletter contains community news, reports from FHA Board members, items of interest to residents, and announcements of club and neighborhood activities.

    The Newsletter is published electronically eleven times a year (July/August is a combined issue). A PDF copy of the current issue can be found on the FHA website: fearringtonfha.org.

    Submissions:

    Content deadlines are the 15th of the previous month. Send submissions to: editors@fearringtonfha.org. All persons submitting content will receive a confirmation email.

    Do you have content for an upcoming newsletter? Email us at the above address and we will send you the "Newsletter Guidelines" and "Style Sheet".

    Newsletter Staff:
    Jan Kowal Ann Melchior
    Leslie Palmer Deborah Repplier
    Jackie Walters  
    Printing and Distribution:
    Carol Kurtz Barbara Amago
    Fearrington Homeowners’ Association
    Board Members

    Fearrington Homeowners’ Association (FHA) is a volunteer, non-profit organization dedicated to the health, safety, and welfare of residents. In addition to fostering resident participation, the Board is responsible for maintenance of common property and covenant enforcement. For additional details, including job descriptions, click on the “FHA” tab on the FHA webpage (fearringtonfha.org).

    Officers  
    President: Carl Angel
    Vice President: Rose Krasnow
    Secretary: Leslee Shell
    Treasurer: Tony Daniels
    Directors  
    Communications: Gordon Pitz
    Community Affairs: Chris Jaeger
    Covenants: Eric Frank
    Grounds and Landscaping: Jesse Fearrington
    Health, Safety and Security: Warren Ort
    Infrastructure and Facilities: Mark Haslam

     


     

    From the Editors

    Let the Voting Begin for the Newsletter Naming Contest!VOTE Naming Contest for Jan 2021

    Your newsletter staff was pleased to receive a whopping fifty-one suggested names. Through a blind poll, we each rated the submissions individually, the ratings were tallied, and a list from most to least popular was formed. We had a fun time at our November meeting reviewing the options, with each stumping for our personal favorites. And, after lengthy discussion, we ended up choosing our top five vote getters.

    Now, readers, it’s time to select your favorite and christen our Fearrington newsletter with an official name. One vote per household so be sure to reach a consensus with housemates. Voting couldn’t be easier—no absentee ballots or standing in line. Just click the Survey Monkey link below and vote your choice between January 1 and Friday, January 15.

    https://www.research.net/r/99ZH5Q7

    The name with the most votes wins, and we’ll debut the winner later this spring.

    Remember, Survey Monkey will accept your household’s vote from January 1 through midnight, January 15.


     

     

    From Our FHA Board

     

     

    Ear loopmasksRecommendations Concerning the Wearing of Masks

    The Health, Safety, and Security Committee met to discuss the issue of wearing masks on Fearrington paths and trails. The following statement represents a consensus of the committee: Warren Ort, Carol Wade, Dr. Art Gerber, Karen Metzguer, Maggie Tunstall, and Gordon Pitz.

    CDC's most recent guidelines for wearing masks dated 12/7/2020 read in part as follows: "People age 2 and older should wear masks in public settings and when around people who don’t live in their household.… A mask is NOT a substitute for social distancing. … Masks may not be necessary when you are outside by yourself away from others, or with other people who live in your household. However, some localities may have mask mandates while out in public and these mandates should always be followed.”

    It may be prudent to always carry a mask with you to don in certain situations, such as when two walkers are approaching from opposite directions and one cannot step off the trail to allow the other to pass. An example is Creekwood Trail where some parts do not allow this. Another would be coming upon a friend and stopping to chat for a while or coming upon a person experiencing a medical event.

    The concept of wearing masks is not new. Masks have been worn by people in a variety of settings. No, not the eye coverings of the Lone Ranger or Marvel's Super Heroes, but mouth and nose coverings worn by surgeons, construction and demolition workers, and people in a variety of laboratory settings, among others.

    The CDC guidelines emphasize that a mask is not a substitute for social distancing. Masks should still be worn in addition to staying at least 6 feet apart. Washing hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol after touching or removing a mask. The CDC website has some other very useful information including types of masks and which are recommended and not recommended.

    Apart from the inconvenience of wearing a mask, it may cause breathing difficulties while engaging in high intensity activities such as running. The bottom line is that people have to use their best judgement when in the presence of others. Several factors determine the risk of contracting the virus from someone else: distance from others, time spent at that distance, ventilation, humidity, protective barriers, and any existing medical conditions (comorbidities).

    An interesting planning exercise is an app developed by the Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT): An Event Risk Assessment Planning Tool. "The risk level is the estimated chance that at least one Covid-19 positive individual will be present at an event in a county, given the size of the event." Chances of exposure change depending on which county you're in and how large the event. Risk increases with the size of the gathering.

    Note from the tool: "You can reduce the risk that one case becomes many by wearing a mask, distancing, and gathering outdoors in smaller groups."

    —Carol Wade, for the Committee

     

     

    Golf Carts in the Villagegolf cart

    Recently, members of the Board have received inquiries about the golf carts that are occasionally being used in the Village. Fearrington was not built with a golf course and, therefore, was never envisioned as a golf cart community. Moreover, it’s important to point out that the roads in Fearrington are state roads. This means that any vehicle being driven on our roads must be licensed by the State of North Carolina, and the drivers of such vehicles must have a NC driver’s license to operate them. Although our covenants are silent with respect to golf carts, drivers must obey all traffic laws.

     

     

    wastewaterWastewater Management Update

    2020 has not been a year with a lot of good news, but we are happy to report that on October 20, 2020, ONSWC-Chatham North, LLC (Chatham North) and Old North State Water Company, LLC (ONSWC) filed to withdraw all the applications related to the transfer of the Fearrington Village wastewater system to Chatham North from the docket of the North Carolina Utilities Commission.

    In addition, Greg Fitch let us know that, as of January 1, 2021, Fitch Utilities, not Envirolink, will manage the Fearrington Village system. Fitch’s prior operations team, consisting of John Poteat, operator of record, and Ronnie Wright, a longtime Fitch Creations employee, will return to their previous roles. In addition, Fitch Utilities has plans to upgrade and renovate our existing plant in 2021 to help it meet today’s stricter standards for discharge of effluent into Jordan Lake. Moreover, our utility rates will remain the same for now ($259.97/year), and residents will be billed annually, although payment plans can be arranged. All of this is good news.

    However, the work of the task force is not done. Our consulting engineer has produced an excellent report for us that looks at the remaining life of the existing plant and questions whether it might make more sense to completely rebuild the plant using one of the many new technologies available today. The report, which can be accessed on the FHA website, takes into account the fact that additional capacity will be needed if Fearrington Village is to continue to grow. But such expansion would have to occur within the basic footprint of our existing plant. It also recommends that any such expansion do everything possible to minimize noise and odors since a number of Fearrington Homes are located in close proximity. We have shared this report with Fitch Creations, and we expect to meet with them and their engineering team early in the new year to discuss possible options.

    We also need to be vigilant because we realize that another utility could seek to buy the Fearrington system. We have no objection if Fitch Utilities were to be taken over by a reputable company that could then make the necessary onsite improvements. However, given the scope of development being proposed in the county, we also know that it is possible a provider might once again put forth some type of interconnected system. We want to make sure that the voices of our residents are being heard throughout any such discussions. For these reasons, our task force will continue to meet on a monthly basis, with additional meetings as needed.

    —Rose Krasnow, vp@fhaboard.org

      

     

    Confusion over Envirolink Bill

    Most of you have received a final sewer bill from Envirolink, and you may have been confused by the amount. The bill is over 50 percent more than you normally pay.

    This does not reflect an increase in fees. Although the bill states that it is for services from November 13 to December 13, the bill actually covers service until the end of December. It is the last bill you will receive from Envirolink. On January 1, service will be taken over by Fitch Utilities (see separate article concerning developments in wastewater service). If you pay by credit card and incur an additional “convenience” fee, it will have increased as well.

    Charges for 2021 through Fitch Utilities will be the same as they have been for this year.

    —Gordon Pitz, communications@fhaboard.org

     

     

    Fearrington Community Assessment SurveyCommunity Assessment Survey

     On or about November 15 we emailed access to, or hand delivered, 1709 individual resident Fearrington Community Assessment surveys.

    When the Survey response period ended on December 8, 900 completed surveys had been returned. This means that 52.7% of Fearrington residents had completed and submitted their individual surveys. This rate of return translates to a 99% confidence limit and a margin of error of 2.25%. In our experience this is an excellent result. If you are one of these respondents, thank you! (Survey responses are anonymous, so we do not know who has completed our community survey.)

    The FHA Lifestyle Subcommittee is in the process of analyzing our community’s responses and preparing a summary report. This summary report will address topics that concern most of our residents. Your responses will help our FHA identify priorities and indicate where you would like your resources invested in the community.

    In addition to a written report, these findings will be discussed in an FHA Webinar early in the new year and continue a collaborative involvement about our community’s priorities.
    Again, a very grateful “thank you” from the Lifestyle Subcommittee for your interest and participation in helping to clarify our community’s future direction.

    —Lifestyle Subcommittee, Long Range Planning Committee, FHA Board

     

     

    ice and snow on roads

     It’s That Time of Year Again

    Yes, snow and ice are on the way. The effects we typically experience for portions of each winter remind us of the challenges we face on our 82 village streets and roads.

    In most instances following snow and ice, plan on slippery walking and driving conditions for 12 to 48 hours, especially in shaded areas. Being in the South, the warming sun should improve conditions quickly. However, the NCDOT does not consider the public roadways in Fearrington Village to be their first priority, and it could be two to three days before these roads are treated and plowed. FHA does not own or maintain any roads within the village.

    If residents leave vehicles parked along the edge of roadways within the village, the road crews will not plow the road. Therefore, for the sake of the neighbors on your street, please do not park your vehicles along the roadway.

    For more information, visit the Health, Safety, and Security Information blog.

    When driving and walking is hazardous, the best course of action is to stay home, open a good book, have a glass of wine, and wait for conditions to improve. Please have a healthy, safe, and secure holiday season.

    —Health, Safety, and Security Committee

     

     

    Volunteers CornerGet involved

     Hello, Fearrington.

    I am Chris Jaeger, your newly volunteered Social Committee chairman for 2021. The next year has lots of potential to be a great return to social events, and we will be needing volunteers to help get up and running again. It will be a great way for you to get to know your neighbors and help make our community better.

    We hope to get The Gathering Place welcome center operating soon. As you may know, it provides you a place to fax and use a copier as well as provide information like newcomers’ packets. With volunteers we had been open on weekday mornings before Covid-19, and we’ll do so again—perhaps starting on a limited schedule.

    A big event has been the Easter Egg Hunt. Even though it is an outdoor activity, it may not happen this year. However, there are several other events that traditionally we have sponsored that we plan on continuing. These include Shredding Saturdays, Meet the Board Coffees, Newcomers’ Welcome, and more.

    If you have ideas that you think the HOA should consider, send them to me and I will contact you to discuss them in detail. The success of community events depends on our wonderful volunteers, so join the team and find out how much fun we can have. I look forward to hearing from you.

    —Chris Jaeger, community@fhaboard.org



     

    Announcements

     

    Fearrington Groups and Organizations


     

    Bulls BearsFearrington Bulls & Bears

    The Fearrington Bulls & Bears Investment Club is a group of Fearrington residents who are interested in improving their investment knowledge and capabilities. We meet monthly during non-summer months and communicate regularly through an email exchange group to share information, insights and ideas about investing.

    Guests are welcome to participate in group meetings or in our email exchange group to gauge their interest in joining the Club. The next meeting will be held by Zoom on January 8 at 9:30 am.

    For more information about the Club, meetings or the exchange, please contact:

    Anna Shearer, President, at 703 217 0322 or ashearer1219@gmail.com.

     

     

    Fearrington Democratic ClubFearrington Dem Club Sm

    The Fearrington Democratic Club is happy to resume monthly programs (via Zoom) in January. Our timely topic on January 26th at 7 pm is "The Road Ahead: More Gerrymandering or Redistricting Reform?” Our speaker is Dr. Jennifer Bremer, a policy analyst, researcher, and economist with over 35 years’ experience in the United States and more than 30 other countries. In 2018, she led a study team examining alternative approaches to redistricting reform under consideration in states that, like North Carolina, do not have citizen-initiated referendum, which led to the formulation of five principles for reasonable redistricting reform as a sound basis for redistricting reform in North Carolina. She currently focuses on public governance reform in North Carolina, where she serves as a member of the board of the League of Women Voters of North Carolina and leads the League’s Statewide Redistricting Reform Team.

    Click here to register and get the Zoom link.

     

     

    Fearrington Garden Club logoFearrington Garden Club

    On January 19, at 3 pm, the Garden Club will offer members a virtual presentation by the North Carolina Botanical Garden, a unit of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Alan Weakley will discuss the NCBG publication, Wildflowers of the Atlantic Southeast, which he co-authored. Dr. Weakley is a plant taxonomist, community ecologist, and conservationist specializing in the southeastern United States. Since 2002, he has served as director of the UNC Herbarium. Members: watch for the email that contains the Zoom link to the live program.

    Despite this year's limited club activities, we hope everyone will renew their membership. Your dues enable the club to fulfill our mission of supporting the horticulture program at Chatham Central High. Please take your $15 (per member) check to the Garden Club's mailbox in the Swim & Croquet kiosk. The membership form can be found in the Groups Portal.

     

     

    Fearrington Genealogy GroupFearrington Genealogy Group

    Tuesday, January 12, 3:00 pm, Zoom teleconference
    Program details will be emailed to members around the first of January. Newcomers welcome: Contact Linda Grimm at 919-533-6296 for details about participating in this event.

     

     

    Fearrington Rep ClubFearrington Republican Club

    Your Fearrington Republican Club is still here and alive. Hope everyone had a great Christmas and Happy New Year. With all the changing edicts from NC government officials we do not know when we will be able to have a meeting at the Gathering Place. 2021 is a non-election year and we would meet the 4th Wednesday which is January 27, 2021. We will keep you informed by email if and when we will be allowed to have a meeting. Our email is frc-nc@hotmail.com and Fearrington Republican club also has a web page on the FHA website.

     

     

    Fearrington Swim & Croquet ClubSwim Croquet Club logo

    Our virtual Annual Membership meeting is scheduled for January 31, 2021, 4 pm to 5 pm. By January 11, 2021, an e-blast from postmaster@esoftplanner.com containing a ballot and details about our board election will be sent to members. Members may print the ballot or pick up a ballot at the Swim & Croquet kiosk. Please return your ballot to the Swim & Croquet box at the kiosk by January 15, 2021. A separate email with a Zoom link will be sent before the meeting.

    Contact us at fearringtonswimcroquet@gmail.com with any questions you may have. We’re looking forward to communicating with you using the chat function on Zoom!

     

     

    rock guitar

     

    Fearrington Village Singers Bob Maars on Guitars and Rock and Roll
    Thursday, January 21, 4 pm

    Join us on Zoom as Fearrington Village Singer’s own Bob Maarschalkerweerd talks about his guitar collection and professional connection with rock and roll. Back by request after appearing on the Dec 3rd FVS Holiday Variety Show, Bob demonstrates his guitars’ sounds and tones and talks about his years on the stage as an instrumentalist and singer in Gilbert and Sullivan and on Broadway. Find the Zoom link at fearringtonvillagesingers.org.

     

     

    Women of Fearrington

    Ever wonder what happens to your recycling? Shannon Culpepper, County Recycling Education Specialist, will speak at our January Webinar, rescheduled to January 27 to avoid conflict with Inauguration Day. Register here for the link.

    How about some socially distanced hot chocolate? The event will be held January 12 on a member’s screened porch. Register online.

    WoF masked holiday marketeers for Jan 2021 Photo by Ed Lallo

    Masked holiday marketeers
    Photo by Ed Lallo

    The WoF Holiday Bakery & Market generated an amazing $5,427 for our grant program, which targets the needs of women and children in Chatham County. Fifty-one volunteers and ninety-three customers made this the most successful Holiday Market ever! Many thanks to everyone.

    We’re also sending out a huge “thank you” to all who ordered a toy on Amazon or dropped one off for delivery to the Chatham County Department of Social Services. They were overwhelmed by the response! Many Chatham children in need will have a wonderful holiday this year. Your generosity is deeply appreciated.

     

    WoF toy drive gifts for Jan 2021 Photo by Chatham County DSS

    WoF toy drive boxes
    Photo by Chatham County DSS

     

    WoF toy drive boxes for Jan 2021 Photo by Chatham County DSS

    WoF toy drive boxes
    Photo by Chatham County DSS

     

     

    Chatham County Agencies

    Chatham Connecting logoChatham Connecting

    Happy 2021! Even with Covid-19 still a part of our lives, the New Year offers many opportunities to get involved with one of the many non-governmental organizations or official Chatham County programs in need of volunteers. Fearrington Village is a charity-friendly community so if you’ve been thinking of getting involved but don’t know where to start, try looking at the Chatham Connecting website, www.chathamconnecting.org. There you’ll find lots of information about the missions of over 100 non-profit organizations and official Chatham County programs. There is something for everyone no matter your interest. Your financial, time, or material donation lets your neighbors in need know that they are not forgotten during this especially difficult winter. Chatham Connecting is a volunteer-run organization that puts those in need together with those who can help. Please be part of the effort, as it’s a great way to start the New Year.

     

     

    Continuing Education Opportunities

    OLLI-Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at Duke University

    A yearlong educational community on the Duke campus as well as other venues—including Galloway Ridge—is now on Zoom. Courses cover history, literature, natural or social sciences, art, music, drama, and current events. Winter registration: January 26-27. Term starts February 15. For class descriptions
    and registration, go to learnmore.Duke.edu/olli. For questions, call Warren Ort, 919-533-6597.

      


    fcares logo

     


     

     

    The Fearrington Cares Center Will Be Closed January 18.

    The Fearrington Cares Center will be closed for appointments and the staff will be off on Monday, January 18, for a national day of service honoring the life of Martin Luther King.

     

     

    Zoom Movement Classes, Support Groups, and Education Program Links Are on Our Website www.fearringtoncares.org.

    Occasionally Zoom program IDs and passwords will change; if you have saved a link it may eventually become inactive. Use the links on our website for a quick, current connection to all Zoom programs. If you would like to practice a Zoom connection and meeting, email info@fearringtoncares.org and we will set that up.

     

     

    Oh, My Aching Shoulder!

    Thursday, January 14, 7:00 pm via Zoom

    You may never be Tommy John or even get that reference (according to Casey Stengel, you could look it up). Of course, these days you could Google Tommy John and Casey Stengel. In any case, arms and shoulders can be sources of aches and pains for athletes and pseudo-athletes. The Zoom Education Committee is happy to host a presentation by Dr. Louis Almekinders, an orthopedic surgeon who specializes in shoulder disorders. This program will cover common issues such as rotator cuff and biceps tendon problems, shoulder arthritis, and frozen shoulder. Dr. Almekinders will include common symptoms and basic initial treatment as well as some discussion of surgical treatment.

    Dr. Almekinders is a native of the Netherlands who completed a residency in Orthopaedic Surgery and a research fellowship at Duke University Medical Center. In 1989 he joined the faculty of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In the ensuing 14 years, he worked as a team physician for the varsity athletic teams and became a tenured, full professor. In 2003, he moved back to Duke University to start the North Carolina Orthopaedic Clinic and is currently a professor in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery.

     

     

    Introduction to Breath Meditation

    Thursday, January 28, 1:30 pm via Zoom

    This program will introduce SKY (Sudarshan Kriya Yoga) Breath Meditation, a set of breathing techniques that can help foster serenity. Every emotion has a specific breathing pattern, so learning to focus on and control the breath can help us manage our mind and emotions. The rhythmic breathing patterns of SKY Breath Meditation can lead the practitioner toward a state of deep meditative relaxation, reducing anxiety, anger, insomnia, and depression.

    Lee Farrow, based in Mountain View, CA, and the daughter of a Fearrington resident, will lead the program. She will offer demonstration and coaching as well as findings from scientific research related to the technique’s effectiveness. Lee became a certified instructor for The Art of Living Foundation in 1997. She currently supports caregivers, military families, and her local community by teaching meditation and SKY Breathing for Kaiser Permanente and Project Welcome Home Troops.

     

     

    Sparking Possibilities for Your New Year Ahead

    Fridays, January 29, February 5 and 12, 1:30 pm via Zoom

    Next year promises to be filled with dips, bumps, and curves! It will certainly be different from 2020! You may find yourself feeling a bit muddled, disconnected, or even stuck, as you face the new year ahead.

    Join us for this three-week Zoom series to explore, clarify, and spark possibilities on your path forward in 2021. Over the course of three one-hour sessions, you’ll have the opportunity to rekindle your personal set of strengths and apply down-to-earth tips and tools for living your best life going forward. Mark your calendar for all three sessions: Fridays 1:30-2:30 pm, January 29, February 5, and February 12.

    Each individual lively session combines a “lecturette” with time for guided self-reflection, fun exercises, and focused discussion. This course is taught by Vicki Field who has designed and led a wide range of workshops in her professional life and as a resident here at Fearrington Village over the past seven years.

     


     

    Join Movement Classes via Zoom
    www.fearringtoncares.org

    All classes 11:30 am

     

    Mondays—Chair Yoga (No class January 18.)

    Wednesdays—Otago Fall-Prevention Exercises

    Join Support Groups via Zoom
    www.fearringtoncares.org

    Caregiver's Support Group:
    Wednesday, January 6 and 20, 12:30–2:00 pm

    Parkinson's Support Group:
    Wednesday, January 13, 3:30–4:30 pm. (New
    members can contact Jan Cope-Kasten
    (jcopekasten@gmail.com) or Karen Metzguer
    (karen@fearringtoncares.org) for information.)

    Living with Chronic Conditions:
    Thursday, January 7 and 21, 1:00 pm

     

     

    A Shout Out to Our Medicare Part D Volunteers!

    A big “Thank You” to John Sullivan and Judy Fitzgerald who this year volunteered over 84 hours to assist residents with their Medicare Part D selections. While we know not everyone reviews their drug program during open enrollment, we celebrate the thousands of dollars this important annual review saves every year for residents who participate. Together, Judy and John provided 68 plan reviews, and collectively, those Villagers will save over $36,000 on Medicare Part D plans in 2021! If you have Plan D coverage, it’s hard to think of a good reason not to review it every year when open enrollment comes around.

     

     

    Medical Equipment Loans (and More!)

    Fearrington Cares has medical equipment on loan for short-term use. You may need equipment temporarily following surgery or during rehabilitation. You may also just want to "try out" a walker or cane to see if is helpful before making a purchase. You may need a wheelchair when someone is visiting for a week or weekend or to take a friend out to dinner, to a museum, or to a ballgame. (Eventually, we will be doing all those things again!) We have the following to loan:

     Commodes
     Crutches/canes
     Shower benches
     Walkers
     Wheelchairs

    We also have a short list of equipment that residents have in their homes and are willing to lend to fellow residents. This includes equipment for young ones such as booster seats, Pack ‘n Plays, toys, and the like that can be lent on a short- term basis.

     

     

    And We Need Equipment!

    Our equipment stash exists due to the generosity of Fearringtonians. If you have something that is no longer needed but might be of assistance to others, please donate it to Fearrington Cares. Also, if you have equipment that you are willing to lend on a temporary basis, please notify us (919-542-6877) and we will add your listing. People are always searching for things like blow-up mattresses and necessities for young visitors (we’re not old but honestly most of us will not fit into a Pack ‘n Play). As always, we’re just neighbors helping neighbors!

     

     

    Covid-19 Information

    Fearrington Cares maintains a website with county, state, and national information about the pandemic and the virus: fearringtoncares.org/resources/covid-19-coronavirus-current-information/.

     



     

    Fearrington Directory Changes

    Welcome to Our New Residents!

    The following persons have been added to the Fearrington Village Directory between November 15 and December 14:

    NameAddressContact Information
    Susan B. ALCORN 4226 Henderson Place Home: suealcorn@carolina.rr.com
    Susan's Cell: 704-905-0396
    Carole J. BRECKINRIDGE
    &
    Michael J. (Mike) ENNIS
    665 Graycliff Carole's Email: breck130@gmail.com
    Mike's Email: michaeljennis@bellsouth.net
    Home: 919-704-8548
    Carole's Cell: 201-841-0805
    Mike's Cell: 201-841-0890
    Anne & Kenneth CLARK  4211 Henderson Place  Home: 919-704-8924 
    John (Mark) & Virginia (Ginny) COSTENBADER  850 Langdon  Home: Jmcvkc@cox.net
    Mark's Cell: 757-646-6661
    Ginny's Cell: 757-636-7330 
    Mary E. EBERST 4614 Montgomery Home: Mee7302@bellsouth.net
    Mary's Cell: 919-815-2232
    Virginia FAUST
    Valerie C. MILLER
    48 Trestle Leaf Valerie's Email: millerv@hpw.com
    Virginia's Cell: 919-234-2869
    Valerie's Cell: 919-624-8418
    Carol FERGUSON 4062 Duplin Carol's Email: cferguson4461@yahoo.com
    Home: 919-533-6262
    Carol's Cell: 919-548-1127
    David E. & Marsha H. FLEMING 1393 Bradford Place David's Email: 1046def@gmail.com
    Marsha's Email: 0747mf@gmail.com
    David's Cell: 315-261-9112
    Marsha's Cell: 315-243-5368
    Brenda & Dr. Brian GINSBERG 4215 Henderson Place Brenda's Email: bginsberg@hotmail.com
    Brian's Email: ginsb001@mc.duke.edu
    Brenda's Cell: 919-225-4443
    Brian's Cell: 919-225-2947
    Laurel GROPPER
    Carl STICE
    579 Woodbury Laurel's Email: lbgrop@gmail.com
    Carl's Email: chapelhilleyecare1@gmail.com
    Laurel's Cell: 919-593-1562
    Carl's Cell: 919-593-1636
    Frank HUGHES 4202 Henderson Place Frank's Email: Hues2hues@gmail.com
    Frank's Cell: 704-491-8108
    Linda & Mickey KESSELMAN 724 Barnsley (620) Home: mickey@kesselmanassociates.com
    Home: 919-704-8882
    Linda's Cell: 847-226-6388
    Mickey's Cell: 847-542-3220
    Joan LAWLER E-103 E Wing Joan's Email: joanladyfox@yahoo.com
    Home: 919-533-6969
    Mark & Meg MCCARTHY 4239 Henderson Place Joan's Email: joanladyfox@yahoo.com
    Home: 919-533-6969
    Jim PERRY
    Denise SHAFFER
    4213 Henderson Place Jim's Email: henderson2@meridianleeward.com
    Denise's Email: henderson@meridianleeward.com
    Dublin POPOV 347 Weymouth Close Dublin's Email: dublinpopov@gmail.com
    Dublin's Cell: 984-214-2815
    Jenny WALKER 924 Woodham Home: jennywalker2@gmail.com
    Home: 919-593-8142

     

    Are you a new resident? Be sure to register on our FHA community website. Doing so will give you full access to website features and allow you to be added to our resident directory. Log on to FearringtonFHA.org and on the top menu click on “Directory.” Then, in the drop-down menus click first on “New Resident” then “List Me in the Directory.”

    Are you an existing resident whose contact information has changed? Don’t forget to update your listing on the FearringtonFHA.org web site. On the landing page, click on the Directory tab on the top menu and then on Update Preferences on the drop-down menu. When you update your contact information online, the updates will be included in the FHA Directory & Handbook printed in January each year. Stay in touch with your fellow residents by keeping your contact information current.

     

     

     

    Calendar for January 2021

    Fearrington Village clubs and groups will be meeting on these dates. Events are usually held at The Gathering Place unless stated otherwise. However, The Gathering Place is currently closed due to Covid-19 restrictions. Therefore, if you have questions, be sure to check with the person or web page listed in the “Contact” column for the most up-to-date information.

    Day/Date/TimeOrganizationEventContact
    Friday
    January 8
    9:30 am 
    Bulls & Bears
    Investment Club 
    Club Meeting
    via Zoom 
    Anna Shearer
    703-217-0322
    ashearer1219@gmail.com 
    Tuesday
    January 12
    10:30 am 
    Women of Fearrington  Hot Chocolate  Mif Flaharty
    808-234-0008 
    Tuesday
    January 12
    3:00 pm 
    Fearrington Genealogy Group  Zoom Teleconference  Linda Grimm
    919-533-6296 
    Tuesday
    January 26
    7:00 pm
    Fearrington Democratic Club Club Meeting
    via Zoom
    Vickie Shea
    919-545-0024
    Wednesday
    January 27
    1:30 pm 
    Women of Fearrington  Recycling Webinar  Tracy Bailey
    302-561-1298

     

     

     
  • FHA Newsletter: July 2021

    fearrington NL logo

    FEARRINGTON  HOMEOWNERS  ASSOCIATION  NEWSLETTER
    July/August 2021        Volume 40        Number 7

     

    President's Message

    Criticism Dogs Us

    If you want to tell people the truth, make them laugh, otherwise they’ll kill you. Oscar Wilde

    At two meetings with friends recently, I mentioned that I was in the final months of my presidency of FHA. To my surprise the responses I got were along the lines of “I bet you will be glad to get out of it; you must get a lot of grief from people!” Fact is, I don’t. Maybe it is because I try to make people laugh—sometimes at the most inappropriate things. It often makes my wife want to hide, which amuses me.

    Yes, like other board members, I get a lot of emails and calls from people needing help or wanting action on something, but that is never a problem. People expect help. Sometimes, especially around covenants issues, tempers fray a bit. Our Director of Covenants, Ric Frank, deserves a medal.

    Board members have disagreements, and we have residents who disagree with the board, but we do not let things get personal among us villagers. I was a corporate guy for a lot of years where competition was fierce, and then I worked in nonprofits or served on their boards. When we left Texas, I was on four nonprofit boards and President of one of them. All in all, things got antagonistic and personal more than I would have liked, but I always tried to lighten the mood.

    FHA is busy with lots of area for disagreement. Beechmast Pond is a good example. We all agree it is important to preserve the natural setting, protect wildlife, and keep an attractive setting. It is also important to take the long view and to minimize demands on our budget. We may disagree about how to best accomplish all those goals, but we all want to acknowledge the disagreements and take a thoughtful approach to resolving the issues.

    Our board of very competent people does work well together, and a key role for me is to facilitate that. There are heavy demands on time for all of us. We have disagreements, but we take the same thoughtful approach to resolving them as a group of friends. Two people have resigned, but that was for purely personal family reasons. As some terms for board members end, there will be openings on the board for next year, and you will hear more about candidates for these positions soon. Thankfully, Rose Krasnow has agreed to move from Vice President to President in the election scheduled for November. No one can do a better job than Rose to promote a congenial, cooperative approach to settling arguments.

    Canine Board Meeting

    Board Meeting   Photo by Carl Angel

     

    The village dogs are an important constituency of mine as well. As I walk my dog Lily around, we meet lots of other dogs. In the four years we have been here I have met only three that have loudly displayed initial personal antagonism (and turn up noses at my jokes) when I try to discuss mutual concerns. I admit having trouble remembering peoples’ names, but I do remember dog names. I recently met a small white dog with a memorable name—TaterTot—who immediately came to agreement with me.

    The dogs do the usual “meet and greet” that goes on between them as they explore solutions to their problems. I often wonder if things might not be better if people could develop an equivalent way to interact, one that, as it does for dogs, allows them to share their moods and feelings. At least it might be a way to prevent disagreements from escalating into dog fights.

    I like criticism, but it must be done my way. Mark Twain



     

     

    From Our FHA Board

     

     

    hands 5216585 640Aging in Community Team

    A key finding of the 2020 Fearrington Community Assessment Survey was the interest from a majority of respondents to “aging in place."

    In response, the FHA Board established a group of volunteers whose intent is to find ways to increase support and the quality of life for residents wishing to age in place.

    Fearrington Cares provides residents with many resources and services through the varied programs they offer. The Aging in Community Team will work to identify additional resources available to support residents wishing to age in the community and in their homes as long as feasible.

    Members of the Team are Karen Metzguer, Executive Director of Fearrington Cares, and residents Matt Alexander, Sheila Creth, Susie Eckblad, Abigail English, Bill Little, and Jane Woodard. Another five residents have contributed to efforts focused on identifying resources on specific topics.

    The Team’s efforts began in May and will continue over the summer months.

    —Sheila Creth

     

     

    Beechmast Pond Survey ResultsSurvey

    In May, residents of Fearrington Village were asked to participate in a survey on their preferences for maintaining Beechmast Pond. The survey presented five options suggested by Kris Bass Engineering (KBE), three of which would be changes to our current approach. Those options were:

    • Continue with the current dredging activity every year
    • Retain pond with an expanded forebay, with dredging every five years
    • Remove pond and create a wetlands area, with bi-annual dredging
    • Remove pond and restore it to a stream
    • No opinion

    The survey was open from May 14th through May 26th. Altogether, 353 responses were received. Below are the results of the survey:

    Response Count Percent
    Continue with the current dredging activity 26 7.4%
    Retain pond with an expanded forebay, with dredging every five years 71 20.1%
    Remove pond and create a wetlands area, with bi-annual dredging 12 3.4%
    Remove pond and restore it to a stream 222 62.9%
    No opinion 22 6.2%
    Total Responding 353  
     
    Fearrington Homeowners’ Association
    Board Members

    Our Fearrington Homeowners’ Association (FHA) is a volunteer, non-profit organization dedicated to the health, safety, and welfare of residents. In addition to fostering resident participation, the Board is responsible for maintenance of common property and covenant enforcement. For additional details, including job descriptions, visit the FHA tab on our webpage (fearringtonfha.org).

    Officers:  
    President: Carl Angel
    Vice President: Rose Krasnow
    Secretary: vacant
    Treasurer: Tony Daniels
    Directors:  
    Communications: Gordon Pitz
    Community Affairs: Pam Bailey
    Covenants: Eric Frank
    Grounds and Landscaping: Jesse Fearrington
    Health, Safety and Security: Warren Ort
    Infrastructure and Facilities: Mark Haslam
    The Belted Gazette

    Newsletter Staff:

    Jan Kowal Production Editor
    Ann Melchior Manager
    Deborah Repplier  Features Editor, Copy Editor; & Proofreader
    Jackie Walters Features Editor, Copy Editor; & Proofreader
    Leslie Palmer Graphic Designer & Photo Editor
    Gordon Pitz Tech Advisor; FHA Advisor

    Printing and Distribution:

    Carol Kurtz Barbara Amago

    This Month's Contributors:

    Carolyn Boyle Tad McArdle
    Sheila Creth Gus Reed
    Tony Daniels Bill Sharpe
    Priya Jain Jackie Walters
    Ed Lallo  

    Submissions:

    Content deadlines are the 15th of the previous month. All persons submitting content will receive a confirmation email.

    Email submissions to: editors@fearringtonfha.org.

    Do you have content for an upcoming newsletter? Email us at the above address and we will send you the Newsletter Guidelines.

    The Belted Gazetteis produced by the Fearrington Homeowners Association (FHA), by and for the residents of Fearrington Village in Pittsboro, NC.

    The Belted Gazette contains community news, reports from the FHA Board members, items of interest to residents, and announcements of club and neighborhood activities.

    The Belted Gazette is published electronically eleven times a year (July/August is a combined issue). A link to the current issue is emailed to all residents who have an email address in the FHA Directory. A pdf copy of the current issue and back issues can be found on the FHA website (fearringtonfha.org).

     Over 62% of the residents of Fearrington who responded preferred the option of a stream restoration. The preferred option of a stream restoration is contingent on the FHA’s obtaining a matching grant to help cover the initial costs of the project. If the Board votes to pursue that option, then KBE will help in writing a grant proposal. It is also necessary that the proposal be sponsored by a nonprofit agency, and KBE will help to set that up.

    The FHA Board will be visiting several restoration projects to acquire a better understanding of the possible end result of undertaking a restoration. Once the Board completes this review, it will vote on which option to pursue.

     

     

    NC DOT logoMeeting with NC Department of Transportation

    On June 16, members of the FHA Board and the Walking Paths and Nature Trails Subcommittee met with representatives of the NC Department of Transportation (NCDoT): Justin Bullock, Chatham County Maintenance Engineer, Jennifer Britt, Assistant District Supervisor, and Blaine Ritter from the Traffic Service Office. The purpose of the meeting was to address several questions that have arisen concerning roads and pathways in Fearrington Village.

    The Walking Paths and Nature Trails Subcommittee has developed a list of proposed improvements for roadside pathways and crosswalks. In this connection, a number of questions have arisen. The questions concern state statutes and regulations that might affect proposals for new or modified pathways and suggested crosswalks. The committee’s proposals, and the attendant questions, were addressed to the NCDoT representatives. You can read the full list of questions and proposals in a separate document.

    For several of the proposals, the right-of-way for state roads limits possible locations for new pathways. There are also other requirements that might apply. For example, pathways must usually be located seven to ten feet from the edge of the right-of-way. If a drainage ditch parallels a road, it is usually better for a pathways to be built on the opposite side. For a crosswalk to be approved, it must connect two existing pathways. Exceptions to the rules can be allowed, with the approval of an encroachment agreement between FHA and NCDoT.

    There was some discussion of other safety issues, such as the installing stop signs, or safety improvements at the intersection of Village Way with Highway 15/501. In addition, current plans for resurfacing village roads during the next fiscal year were outlined. Contracts for the work will be let soon, and the resurfacing should be complete by June 2022.

    There was not enough time before this issue of the newsletter went to press to include more details. However, a summary of the discussion will be provided on the FHA Website, and should be available by the time this newsletter appears. Please check the website for up-to-date information.

    —Gordon Pitz (communications@fhaboard.org)

     


     

    Features

     

    Scene Around Fearrington96LPweb

     

     

    Priya Jain images

     

    They say pictures are worth a thousand words; allow me to add few more. I’m an amateur photographer who believes in spontaneous and candid shots. Through my camera, I catch the visual beauty of nature, feel lucky to see the world in a unique way and able to connect with all my subjects—animate and inanimate.

    In SoCal, going to the beach is like going to a grocery store, very habitual, weekends, weekdays and in-between.

    As a result, I started carrying my camera outdoors all the time and taking random shots—still do it. If hobbies pass from parents to children, I believe my passion about photography came from my dad. I remember his Minolta and Kodak film cameras, manual focus, and all. He taught me a lot, including how to develop pictures!

    My pictures may not tell a connecting story. The only common factor is sunlight/natural light and, of course, nature.

    It adds the right narrative for the shot, boundless beauty or the attempt, you be the judge. I just appreciate everything I come across, and often times I am successful in catching the right mood.

    —Priya Jain

     

    Food Truck Trial Fosters Community

    By Jackie Walters

    A six-week trial with food trucks in Fearrington generated interest and a flurry of social gatherings among neighbors. Although the initial evening proved somewhat frustrating around process—there was confusion around ordering online, long waits for delivery, and a truck crew clearly overwhelmed by the huge volume of orders—the majority of residents were pleased with their food.

    Picking up orders at the Umami truck

    Picking up orders at the Umami truck    Photo by Ed Lallo

    Among my Bush Creek neighbors, one couple perhaps typifies the variety of conclusions based on the first night. Husband: "No more food trucks because they can't get their act together." Wife: “No worries, we’ll continue trying the new fare.” Both agreed the food from the Umami truck was good, as did my other neighbors. Subsequently, 12 folks from this group gathered for dinner as they eagerly participated in Gussy’s Greek Food and Munchilove’s brownies (June 2), as well as the Fish & Chips from The Paddy Wagon (June 9).

    Your order is ready at the Paddy Wagon

    Your order is ready at The Paddy Wagon!    Photo by Ed Lallo

     

     

     

     

    Gathering outside to eat al fresco, partaking of adult beverages, and reviewing the food continued a tradition begun during the long months of pandemic restrictions. Everyone contributed something—snacks to tide us over while waiting for pickup notification, homemade wasabi, and yummy chocolate brownies. Strikingly, the email traffic cemented plans for getting together as soon as the FHA email about the first food truck night appeared.

    Several residents picking up orders at the food trucks commented that they planned to take their meals home, grateful for some variety and for opportunities to sample ethnic cuisine in the neighborhood. Some were caring for spouses who had had recent health issues, and getting a take-out meal offered in the Village, delivered hot and on-time, was a welcome respite from having to prepare a meal or drive a distance to a restaurant.

    Others, like the Bush Creek ensemble, took advantage of an opportunity to entertain, share a communal experience with food, and build on relationships fostered throughout the pandemic.

    According to our Village food truck coordinator, trucks are typically booked months in advance and trying to obtain commitments from vendors was no small feat. In nearby communities like the Preserve at Jordan Lake and Briar Chapel, trucks come in at least weekly and are committed for the season.

    Approaching these first trucks, our coordinator discovered Fearrington Village was an unknown market to them. Although vendors like to have an idea of numbers in advance, they agreed to come when all they were told was that there were 1200 residents with an appetite for dinner options. Uncertainty is no longer a concern, as one of the food truck promoters recently shared via email: “I am telling you Fearrington has been awesome!! …it is truly THE busiest community I have sent any of my trucks to in the last year, honestly. They are all dying to come back out/dying to have their first trip, lol. On top of it being busy, they said that people were truly so, so nice and kind.” That certainly sounds like the neighbors I know.

    Jackie Walters is on the staff of The Belted Gazette and lives in the Bush Creek neighborhood.


     

     

    It Takes a Village: Food Truck Help Wantedhelp needed

    Our FHA Board has approved having food trucks continue beyond the initial trial basis. To that end, there are a few volunteer slots to fill.

    How would you like to be a truck greeter, or a coordinator of truck greeters? We need somebody willing to take responsibility for meeting the trucks about a half hour in advance on the dates they’re scheduled to assist them with parking—this also means putting out cones earlier in the day (at least for the summer months while people are parking at the pool).

    We also need someone willing to own the responsibility for publicizing the trucks: posting on Nextdoor, submitting schedules to The Belted Gazette, printing and posting flyers at the mail kiosks, etc.

    Note that for the summer, truck scheduling will likely continue to be somewhat irregular, but as soon as we’re able, the goal is to get them scheduled weekly. Please consider helping to make this endeavor successful! Send emails stating your interest to Deborah Repplier at drepplier@gmail.com.

     

     

    old time food truckFearrington Village Food Trucks Page

    We have a hotspot page that lists our complete food truck schedule! https://streetfoodfinder.com/fearringtonvillage will always have the most up-to-date information. Additionally, when pre-ordering opens closer to the “event,” you can link right from our hotspot page. You can leave feedback about the specific trucks, and perhaps most importantly, you can sign up for daily or weekly emails to send our schedule right to your inbox!

    A couple of things to note: with one exception, all of the trucks use the Street Food Finder app for ordering (the same way you’ve been doing it). The one exception is Cousins Maine Lobster, which uses its own app and compiles loyalty points, etc. (you can download from Google Play or the Apple Store).

    We will also continue to post info on our FHA homepage under the Announcements tab.

     

     

    The Lyndfield Ladies—“Getting to Know You . . .”

    By Tad McArdle

    Lyndfield Close. Those of us who live here know just where it is. But what we may not know is that just about every day around 5 pm, a group of single ladies from the Close joined by one lady from nearby Wintercrest set up their chairs and meet for drinks (wine, milk, whatever) and for lively, intimate conversation. No matter what the weather, they have been observing this ritual since just before the pandemic put its grim and isolating hold on our nation.

    Lyndfield Ladies

    Front row: Nancy Jenkins, Tina Patterson, Peggy Bard; back row: Liz Neer, Carol Palm, Dell Ford, Pat McCann, Chriss Johnson, Linda Baggish, Sally Phillips, Irma Baron, Debbie Solomon; way in the back is a guest of Nancy Jenkins; not pictured: Pat Brubaker, Rita Duffy, Jackie Mason     Photo by Tony Daniels

    I recently spoke to three of the Ladies: Nancy Jenkins (initiator), Tina Patterson (in it from the start), and native Londoner Peggy Bard, who recently celebrated her 95th birthday and, reportedly, has the best memory in the group. Nancy, the energetic pastor who finds listening to people’s stories “about as good as it gets,” was the one who got things going a short time before the pandemic closed down the country. According to Tina, Nancy is a very restless, active person who was “going bonkers” with isolation even before Covid-19 started, and who said one fine day in February or March, “I’m going out there with my chair.” She soon rang Peggy’s doorbell and went around the entire Close recruiting people, saying “Bring a chair and come on out!”

    And they did. According to Nancy, every day around 5, people would look out their windows, and if anyone was out there, they would come out and join and just get to talking. Soon after the pandemic hit, conversation turned to toilet paper—where to get it, who was running out, etc. According to Nancy, her 12-year-old grandson asked her early on what they talked about; you can guess her answer. A shortage of toilet paper was a topic that in more formal circumstances might have served as a convenient icebreaker; however, given the range of topics that came up in the succeeding days, weeks, and months, it’s clear that these ladies were prepared to dive right in, no matter what the temperature or the subject. TV movies were a common topic, as were religion and recipes (several members were raised Jewish and exchanged some excellent Kugel techniques), and after some research, the group took votes on which area stores had the best bialys.

    Politics came up occasionally, but without rancorous exchanges. According to Tina, there were some who did not vote the way the majority did, but they were not made uncomfortable by the discussion. “There was no war in the street.”

    One major focus has been on people’s life stories. And when you hear life stories, what emerges may set you dancing or may be tough to hear; what the stories have in common is they are not your own. You may thenceforth see your own life differently.

    Peggy Bard was 13 in London when World War II hit, and soon residents were rushing to air-raid shelters while terrifying sounds filled the air overhead. “The war changed everything,” she said. Her sister met and married an American G.I., and that eventually led to Peggy’s arrival in New York City in 1948 to visit that sister: “I was standing on the ship, waiting to get off, looking down at the pier where my sister and brother-in-law were standing, and there were loads of policemen standing around, and they were all carrying guns. And I had never seen that before. That was the first impression I had of America. I’ve gotten used to that now.”

    In New York, Peggy began working in the talent industry having done similar work in London. She remembers doing background work for the movie, “The Red Shoes.” And that led Tina Patterson to recall that her mother had forbidden her to see “The Red Shoes” as she deemed it “too frightening.”

    Tina’s mother had had a successful career in ballet. “My mother was very competitive and very tough,” she said. Tina wanted to be a ballet dancer as well. “But mom said no, as she was convinced that I didn’t have either the body (tight hamstrings) or the temperament. And she was right! After her ballet career, my mom turned to golf, and her near-fanatical approach led her to be a champion golfer. Then one day her husband’s father, a ’gallant’ fellow whose company she enjoyed, invited her to his fancy golf club for lunch. When the food arrived, he looked her straight in the eye and said, ’Now, it’s about the golf. It has to stop.’ Apparently, she had spent so much energy on golf that when her husband came home from work, she would be asleep, ‘dead to the world’.”

    As time went by, and the daily meetings continued, the Lyndfield Ladies met each other’s needs. If there was trouble, they would gather ’round and deal with it. They would buy groceries for each other; they coordinated their Covid-19 vaccinations so that they almost all went to the Friday Center on the same day. They talked and they listened, and they learned.

    So, the Lyndfield Ladies are going deep, day by day, discovering all sorts of things, and as Nancy summarized it, “We’re proud of ourselves, and we love each other.” As the song goes,

    “Haven't you noticed?
    Suddenly I'm bright and breezy
    Because of all the beautiful and new
    Things I'm learning about you
    Day by day . . . .”

    “Getting to Know You” (Rodgers/Oscar Hammerstein II)
    © 1951, Copyright Renewed, Williamson Music Company (ASCAP) c/o Concord Music Publishing.

    Tad McArdle is a regular contributor to The Belted Gazette.

     

    Fearrington Puzzler96webThe Fearrington Puzzler

    June’s Puzzler Answer
    Submitted by Bill Sharpe

    June 2021 Puzzlers block

    The concrete block in June’s Puzzler    Photo by Bill Sharpe

     

     

    The large concrete block located off Barnsley remains as a remnant of the history of the land that is now Fearrington Village. It supported a steam engine to drive a sawmill for cutting and planing lumber. Jesse Fearrington (1919-2014) told me that the date on the block was 1912. The sawmill and steam engine were eventually moved up to sit beside Highway 15. In 1935 after the old Mount Pleasant Methodist Church burned, the Fearringtons prepared and donated lumber for the inside of the new brick church.

     

    July/August 2021 Puzzler
    Submitted by Gus Reed

    Match the location in the table below with the column number containing its demographic information.

     

    Location Column Number – Demographics
    Chatham County  
    Fearrington Village  
    North Carolina  
    Pittsboro  

     

    Demographics 1 2 3 4
    Education: BA or above 44% 42% 50% 78%
    Median Household Income $57,341 $66,857 $44,399 $71,307
    Females 51% 52% 60% 61%
    Males 49% 48% 40% 39%

     

    Check your answers in the table at the end of this issue.

    Gus loves statistics and has two booklets with a focus on Fearrington.

     


     

    Announcements

     

    Fearrington Groups and Organizations


     

    Fearrington.Concert.SeriesFearrington Concert Series

    The Fearrington Concert Series happily announces plans for the upcoming 2021-2022 season. Music lovers and subscribers are invited to enjoy Sunday afternoon chamber music concerts at The Gathering Place beginning on September 12 at 3:00 pm with the THREE FOR ALL TRIO. Former subscribers will soon be receiving information about the entire 6-concert series. Safety guidelines will be in place with possible restrictions on audience numbers, spacing, etc.

     

     

    Fearrington Dragons Mah Jongg!!Mah Jongg

    Fearrington Dragons Mah Jongg plays on the second Saturday of the month from 1-4 pm. We will play on Saturday, July 10, at 1 pm. We meet at The Gathering Place and will play under their guidelines. (Read the policy.)

    As such, we must limit our number to 36. Contact Mary Donna Pond at mdpond@nc.rr.com to reserve your place. Because of this limitation, it is important to cancel if you discover you are not able to play so someone else can take your spot. Annual dues have been waived for 2021.

     

     

    duplicate bridgeFearrington Duplicate Bridge Club

    “Play bridge. It’s cheaper than therapy.”

    We of the Fearrington Duplicate Bridge Club agree. After a year playing on computers, we have begun to enjoy each other’s company around the bridge table once again.

    Join us every Wednesday during June, July, August, and the first half of September at 1 pm in The Gathering Place under the directorship of John Torrey, our new leader.

    The first time playing is free. If you’d like to check us out, come to watch. We charge $7/time for hand records, our participation in the American Contract Bridge League, and our director.

    If you have any questions or need a partner, please contact Jean Hjelle, 919-548-6216 or jeanshjelle@gmail.com.

     

     

    The Fearrington Garden ClubFearrington Garden Club logo

    We eagerly anticipate the return of in-person meetings this fall. The board has been plowing on, with numerous ideas for programs and road trips under cultivation. Given the pandemic, we were unable to put forth and vote on a slate of officers last year, so several members have "overripened" in their terms. To ensure that no one is overwhelmed with duties, the board has been working as a lively collective. And with several programs already tentatively planned, it's a wonderful time to join in and take a turn at the tiller. If you would like to help grow your Garden Club by serving on the board, please contact Susan Biddulph at sbiddulph@mac.com or 919-533-6306.

     

     

    Fearrington Golf ClubFearrington Golf Club

    The Fearrington Golf Club invites golfers of all abilities to join our club. Founded in 1990,
    the club currently boasts a membership of over 50 golfers and is open to all interested players who reside in Fearrington Village and the surrounding area. The club offers year-round, scheduled play on Tuesdays and Thursdays at various courses in the area.

    If you would like more information on joining and/or an application, please contact our Membership Chairman, Brian Wong, at bwong5705@gmail.com.

     

     

    greenscenebanner2Fearrington Green Scene

    The Green Scene usually suspends our monthly meetings in July and August when so many of us are off to the beach, the mountains, or other far-off places. But, in this era of Covid-19, when we haven't had any monthly meetings for more than a year, we thought that we just might interrupt the pattern—at least for July.

    There is certainly no lack of environmental topics—global, national, and local—deserving of attention. So, we will meet on Wednesday, July 14, at 11:00 am, in the large room of The Gathering Place—allowing for social distancing.

    Potential topics include:

    - United States rejoining the Paris Accords
    - Update on modification plans for the Fearrington Wastewater Treatment Plant
    - Progress report on the FHA Trails and Walking Paths committee work
    - Cancellation of the Keystone XL Pipeline
    - Review of results report for the May 15, 2021 "3-in-1" Event

    The Green Scene welcomes any and all Fearrington residents who share an interest in sustaining and improving our environment.

    —Jason Welsch, Moderator
    914-806-4852 (Cell Phone)

     

     

     

    Swim Croquet Club logoFearrington Swim & Croquet Club

    It has been great to see members this season enjoying all the recreational activities available at the club. The upper lawn is being used for badminton, volleyball, tether ball, shuffleboard, and horseshoes, while the cabana has ping pong, and the lower level has croquet. And in addition to relaxing in the pool and on the lawns, members are exercising in lap lanes and water aerobics classes.

    Croquet summer activities include Wednesday Wine and Wickets at 5 pm, First Sunday Organized Play, and a Summer Croquet Ladder. Contact Jan Droke at jantomdro@gmail.com to be added to the croquet email list.

    For questions or comments, email us at fearringtonswimcroquet@gmail.com.

     

     

    Fearrington Village Singers Alive and WellFVS logo

    FVS picnicWhat was that big group picnicking in Camden Park last May? It was the Fearrington Village Singers and their families. Director Matt Fry even brought his mother, whom he affectionately calls Momster. We haven’t been able to sing for a year because of the Covid-19 quarantine, but we are still together and hoping to be able to resume rehearsals in the fall. This depends on The Gathering Place and Galloway Ridge opening for larger groups like ours in September. Our goal is to create a holiday concert for you so we all feel as if we are getting back to the way we want things to be.

     

     

    WOF CMYK OvalWomen of Fearrington

    Women of Fearrington is on hiatus for the summer, but the new board is at work making plans for 2021-22. All women of Fearrington Village and Galloway Ridge are invited to join us! See our website for the form to join or renew your membership.

    In May, Women of Fearrington granted $34,195 to fourteen organizations for programs supporting women and children in need in Chatham County. Heartfelt thanks to our sponsors and all who supported our fundraising activities and the Wonderful Options Fund.

    In April, Chatham County kicked off a six-month, community-wide celebration of its 250th anniversary. On Wednesday, September 22 at 1:30 pm, WoF will host historians who’ve delved into different aspects of Chatham’s culture, growth, and contributions to the Triangle and beyond.

    Keep in touch this summer via the website, www.womenoffearrington.org, for information on welcome coffees, small group gatherings, cooking classes, road trips, and other upcoming events.

     

     

    Chatham County Agencies

    Chatham ConnectingChatham Connecting logo

    At last, life feels near normal! Non-profit agencies are powering up their activities and
    seeking volunteers. No matter your age or interest, Chatham Connecting is the
    starting point for learning about the needs of over 100 helping-organizations in Chatham
    County. School vacation means there is time for children to get involved, and volunteering from home is an option for people whose outside activities are curtailed. Many agencies welcome new ideas for donation drives from groups or individuals. With studies showing the benefits of volunteering for mental and physical health, anytime is a good time to get involved. Your help and ideas will be appreciated.

     

     

    Community Remembrance Coalition—Chatham

    These activities will be taking place over the summer. To register, go to crc-c.org. All will be taking place via Zoom.

    Saturday, July 10 @ 4 pm Virtual Storytelling for Children with Evie Evans, from Chatham Community Library featuring Black History stories

    Wednesday, August 18 @ 7 pm Actor Sonny Kelly will perform his play, The Talk; made possible by a grant from the Paul Green Foundation

    Thursday, August 26 @ 3 pm A book discussion of Wilmington’s Lie: The Murderous Coup of 1898 and the Rise of White Supremacy* by David Zucchino, hosted by Adele Kelly and Armentha Davis    *Winner of the 2021 Pulitzer Prize for General Nonfiction


    fcares logo

     


     

     

    Fearrington Cares Center Is Closed July 5—9

    The Center may be closed for the holiday, but our volunteers will be busy providing medical transportation and handyperson services. If you need assistance with either of these areas of service, call the center at 919-542-6877 and leave a message in the appropriate voicemail mailbox; a volunteer will be in touch with you.Re-Opening Fearrington Cares—Phase 2

     

     

    Re-Opening Fearrington Cares—Phase 2

    “Risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection is minimal for fully vaccinated people. The risk of SARS-CoV-2 transmission from fully vaccinated people to unvaccinated people is also reduced. Therefore, fully vaccinated people can resume activities without wearing a mask or physically distancing, except where required by federal, state, local, tribal, or territorial laws, rules, and regulations, including local business and workplace guidance.” (CDC 28 May 2021)

    Using available guidance from the CDC and NCDHHS, Fearrington Cares is joining Chatham Council on Aging and other county agencies in opening in-person services. Please review our website (www.fearringtoncares.org) for a description of Phase 2 activities and guidelines. Note that some of our Movement Classes and Support Groups will be meeting in person!

     

     

    Fearrington Cares Board of Directors

    Committee work is not the most exciting volunteer opportunity around here, but we sure do need and appreciate individuals who are able to serve in this way. Directors serve two years, beginning in September, and can choose to continue for one or two more terms. Please thank these individuals if you see them out and about.

     

    Continuing Directors:
    Barbara Hummel-Rossi
    Linda Patterson
    Mark Asman
    JoAnn Pitz
    Cathy Somer
    Anne Henkels
    Carol Kurtz
    Janine Griffin 

    Retiring Directors:
    Cindy Kahler
    Kay White
    Mike Hancock 

    New Directors:
    Mickey Kesselman
    Terry Lucas
    Carl Angel
    Gillian Rogers 

     

     

     

    Zoom Movement Classes, Support Groups & Education Programs Links Are on Our Website, www.fearringtoncares.org.

    Click on the blue Zoom button on our home page and scroll to the correct program/class/support group. If you would like to practice a Zoom connection and meeting, email info@fearringtoncares.org and we will set that up. Note that some of our Movement Classes and Support Groups will be meeting in person!

     

     

     


     

    Movement Classes
    www.fearringtoncares.org

    All classes 11:30 am

    In-person attendees must be fully vaccinated.

    Mondays—Chair Yoga
    (Zoom only July and August; no class July 5)

    Wednesdays—Otago Fall-Prevention Exercises
    (Zoom in July; Center in August; no class July 7,
    14)

    Thursdays—Line Dancing
    (No class July 8; classes begin in Center on July
    15)

    Support Groups via Zoom
    www.fearringtoncares.org

     

    Living with Chronic Conditions:
    Thursdays, July 1, 15 and August 5, 19; 1:00 pm

    Parkinson's Support Group:
    No July or August meeting

    Health Services Offered at the Fearrington Cares Center

    Nurse Consultation: Walk-in clinic open for fully vaccinated residents.
    Appointment required for unvaccinated residents; call 919-542-6877

    Foot Clinic:
    Thursday, July 15, August 19; appointment
    required, call 919-542-6877

    Support Groups Meeting in Person at the Fearrington Cares Center

     

    Alcoholics Anonymous:
    Mondays 10 am; no meeting July 5

    Caregivers Support Group:
    Wednesdays, July 21, August 18; 12:30–2:00 pm; no meeting July 7 or August 4

     

     

    These People Bled for Fearrington Cares!

    Story and Photos by Ed Lallo

    The big white bus plastered with red crosses and Picasso-style human figures painted on its side sat in the nearly deserted Gathering Place parking lot. The loud hum of a generator broke the quiet as a lone masked figure entered the rear door. At the age of 86, Carol Goettman had walked over a mile from Galloway Ridge with a single mission: to give a pint of blood so others might live.

    Carol Goettman    

    Fearrington Cares sponsored the American Red Cross bloodmobile on Thursday, May 13. From shortly after 9:00 am until 3:00 pm, workers retrieved pint after pint of blood desperately needed during the current shortage. On that day, the Red Cross collected enough blood product from 20 donors to impact up to 48 patient lives; three people had the chance to donate for the first time.

    Dan Lewandowski

    “I usually give blood about twice a year, when it is convenient,” said Goettman, sitting on a couch at the front of the bus drinking bottled water to replenish her fluids. “This was a very good process with no problems. I am amazed they still want my blood; it is tired blood for sure.” Goettman’s O+ blood is drastically needed by hospitals across the state. For more than a year, the pandemic has resulted in a severe blood shortage, not just in North Carolina but across the USA. Fearrington resident Dan Lewandowski had a great blood-giving experience. “It was a little close quarters, but the chair was very comfortable and the staff was great.” Lewandowski, a former Detroit resident with A+ blood, gives regularly every eight-weeks. He admits he has not upgraded to the Red Cross phone app to schedule his appointments. “I’m old school, I guess,” he said.

    “As a volunteer Blood Donor Ambassador at the Red Cross’ Durham Blood Center I’ve watched the number of donors drop significantly over the past year,” said Fearrington resident, Jackie Walters. “Where three donors were scheduled every 15 minutes, we now have one or none. Keeping the blood supply current is critical for hospitals as the pandemic amply demonstrated. I’m a Donor Ambassador and a blood donor.” Walters reiterated the importance that neighbors, like those in Fearrington, give blood regularly to “Give Life.” “I think everyone should volunteer to give blood if they can,” said Goettman. “Anytime you have an opportunity to do something nice and useful, especially at this age, you have to take advantage of it. The only downside of the bus was I miss the good cookies you get afterwards in larger venues.” 

     

     

    Help Your Neighbors by Driving for Fearrington Cares!

    Upcoming Training Session
    Wednesday, July 14, 1:00 pm at the Fearrington Cares Center

    Fearrington Cares can always use more driver, handyperson, and computer support volunteers. We will have training for drivers on July 14. Our drivers provide transportation for residents to medical appointments, other health related appointments, and grocery shopping. Requests must be within a 25-mile radius of Fearrington Village. Our volunteers work in a team of three drivers and are assigned to cover one week at a time, two weeks per year. Good driving skills, a current driver’s license, and insurance are required. Drivers use their own vehicle. If you have any interest in or questions about volunteering, please call the Center (919-542-6877) for more information.

     

     

    Enriching Your Retirement Years with Pets

    Retirement and golden years beckon with the promise of less stress and fewer demands. However, we may find that even happily anticipated changes also feel somewhat disruptive and unsettling. Our pets can be one way to buffer the transition and enrich this chapter of life.

    1. Pets require an established routine around which we can structure daily life. Maintaining a consistent schedule, especially for eating and sleeping, can be a boon to brain and body health.

    2. Walking your pet, playing fetch with your dog, or dragging a string or ribbon around the house as “prey” for your cat to “catch” are good sources of exercise. Keeping physically active equals healthy aging.

    3. Our pets are totally dependent on us for their care, safety, and their very lives. That can give us a sense of responsibility and purpose.

    4. Pets provide companionship, a wonderful antidote to loneliness and isolation. Their unconditional affection and acceptance remind us that we are loved and lovable.

    Pet ownership is not the right choice for everyone; however, incorporating these four points can enhance anyone’s days! For more information on caring for your pets, check out the Chatham Animal and Rescue Education website at www.chathamanimalrescue.org. CARE is a non-profit animal welfare organization that promotes responsible pet ownership through educating the community, providing targeted spay-neuter programs, and fostering homeless dogs and cats until they are placed in loving, permanent homes.



     

    Beltie on a bench for emailweb96LPWelcome to Our New Residents!

     

    The following persons were added to the Fearrington Village Directory between May 15 and June 14. Want to reach out to your new neighbor? You will find their contact information on our community web page: FearringtonFHA.org (click Find People under the Directory tab).

    Name Address
    Teresa Balatico  28 Swim and Croquet (2020) 
    Jenna Best & Alec Senese  101 Creekwood 
     Cheryl A. Brown  477 Beechmast
    Celeste Collins   633 Spindlewood
    Hans G. Fladung & Dr. Cathy A. Maahs-Fladung 12 Macon (4012)
    John & Sheila May E 210 E Wing
    Anne Michael 1312 Langdon Place
    Jim Pearce 409 Brampton Close
    Susan & Virgil Riggsbee 14 Macon (4014)
    Ann & Kenneth Samuelson 19 Macon (4019)

     

    Are you a new resident? To register your information in the Directory, visit the FHA website at https://fearringtonfha.org On the top menu click on Directory then, in the drop-down menus, click first on New Resident, then List Me in the Directory.  Fill in the resulting form with your information.

    Then, to obtain full access to website features you must also create a website account (available only to residents or non-resident owners).  Return to the website’s homepage and find the words "Login Form" in the left column.  Click "Create an account" and follow the instructions.  You can read about the account activation process here.

    Are you an existing resident whose contact information has changed? Don’t forget to update your listing on the FearringtonFHA.org web site. On the landing page, click on the Directory tab on the top menu and then on Update Preferences on the drop-down menu. When you update your contact information online, the updates will be included in the FHA Directory & Handbook printed in January each year. Stay in touch with your fellow residents by keeping your contact information current.

     

     

     

    July/August 2021CalendarBeltie July Calendar

     

    The Gathering Place has reopened with new Covid-19 guidelines in place (as of May 16). These guidelines will impact the way group meetings are held. Check with the listed contact person for more information about any restrictions.

    Day/Date/Time Organization Event Contact
    Meeting Weekly in July and August     
     Every Wednesday
    1 pm
     Duplicate Bridge Duplicate Bridge  Jean Hjelle
    919-548-6216
    jeanshjelle@gmail.com 
     Coming in September:    
     Sunday
    September 12
    3 pm
     Fearrington Concert Series  Concert
    Three for All Trio
    Barbara Hummel-Rossi
    919-533-6248
    Wednesday
    September 22
    1:30 pm
    Women of Fearrington General Meeting:
    History of Chatham
    Adrienne Lallo
    512-619-1365

     

     

    July/August Puzzler Answer:

     

    Location Column Number – Demographics
    Chatham County  2
    Fearrington Village  4
    North Carolina  1
    Pittsboro  3

     

     
  • FHA Newsletter: May 2021

    fearrington NL logo

    FEARRINGTON  HOMEOWNERS  ASSOCIATION  NEWSLETTER
    May 2021        Volume 40        Number 5

     

    President's Message

     
    Curmudgeon

    Carl Albert
    and Uncle Bob

     

    The Troubled Curmudgeon

    “…. just sliding down the razor blade of life” – Tom Lehrer

    A very dear friend of years ago, whom my children called Uncle Bob, loved to be considered the world’s greatest pessimist, and he used the quote above whenever asked “how are you doing?” He also responded to coworkers’ cheerful cries of “TGIF” by saying, “Just that much closer to another Monday.”

    Over the years I have used Uncle Bob’s character to make me look like an optimist. In reality, I am, as one of my household (but not my dog) has christened me, a Curmudgeon—one who expects the worst of people and events.

    These days that “Curmudeondry” is under threat. Residents of the village, especially other members of the FHA Board, continue to do their jobs well, which does nothing to help restore my mood.

    • Spring is the most dangerous foe, with plants and trees blooming and often a sweet smell in the air (not counting the pine pollen). Our FHA team is working diligently to keep the village and landscaping the way people wish it to be, which makes it harder for a curmudgeon like me to feel comfortable.

    • For a while, selecting Associa HRW as our management company showed promise of being a bad decision. Yet board members are teaming with the excellent new Manager (Kathy) and Assistant Manager (Darla) to make things better every day. They do have to ask for patience from homeowners and service groups while they learn more about the operations of the FHA, but it becomes increasingly difficult to remain pessimistic.

    • The Briar Chapel Community Park now has a dog park which is in use by many of our residents. My dog loves others but is mostly a “greet and sniff” girl who then wants to go hunting by herself. She goes with me because she knows it gives me joy to see all the other dogs.

    • Neighbors, and people I meet on my dog walks, persist in being friendly and helping each other, and it seems to matter not a bit that I’m grumpy. They wear masks and maintain a recommended social distance. Do they do that just to irritate me?

    • The Pandemic threat was an enormous boon for the Curmudgeon, but it seems to be losing its hold. Places where people meet are reopening, including our beloved Gathering Place so that we can see each other again and get out and travel. It appears that most people in the village have now been vaccinated.

    • Members of many nonprofit boards on which I have served spent their time arguing, backbiting, or jockeying for position. However, this is far from the case with the current Board, which can be very annoying to the Curmudgeon. They ignore the thrill I get from interpersonal conflict and keep happily working together. Even now, they are actively engaged in a process forming committees to find the best ways to implement the will of residents from our recent Community Survey.

    So, I am almost at the point of giving up. I suffer a great deal of emotional turmoil imagining myself to be an optimist, but I am being driven to it by people and events.


     

     

    The Belted Gazette

    The Belted Gazetteis produced by the Fearrington Homeowners Association (FHA), by and for the residents of Fearrington Village in Pittsboro, NC. The Belted Gazette contains community news, reports from the FHA Board members, items of interest to residents, and announcements of club and neighborhood activities.

    The Belted Gazette is published electronically eleven times a year (July/August is a combined issue). A link to the current issue is emailed to all residents who have an email address in the FHA Directory. A pdf copy of the current issue and back issues can be found on the FHA website (fearringtonfha.org).

    Submissions

    Content deadlines are the 15th of the previous month. All persons submitting content will receive a confirmation email.

    Email submissions to: editors@fearringtonfha.org.

    Have an idea for an article for an upcoming newsletter? Email us at the above address so we can send you a copy of our Guidelines and feature submission form.

    Newsletter Team:

    Jan Kowal Production Editor
    Ann Melchior Manager
    Deborah Repplier  Feature & Copyeditor; Proofreader
    Jackie Walters Feature & Copyeditor; Proofreader
    Leslie Palmer Graphic Designer & Photo Editor
    Gordon Pitz Tech & Software Advisor; FHA Advisor

    Printing and Distribution:

    Carol Kurtz, Barbara Amago
    Fearrington Homeowners’ Association
    Board Members

    Our Fearrington Homeowners’ Association (FHA) is a volunteer, non-profit organization dedicated to the health, safety, and welfare of residents. In addition to fostering resident participation, the Board is responsible for maintenance of common property and covenant enforcement. For additional details, including job descriptions, visit the FHA tab on our webpage (fearringtonfha.org).

    Officers  
    President: Carl Angel
    Vice President: Rose Krasnow
    Secretary: Pam Bailey
    Treasurer: Tony Daniels
    Directors  
    Communications: Gordon Pitz
    Community Affairs: Vacant
    Covenants: Eric Frank
    Grounds and Landscaping: Jesse Fearrington
    Health, Safety and Security: Warren Ort
    Infrastructure and Facilities: Mark Haslam

     


     

    From the Editors

    Help Wanted for The Belted GazetteBeltie Help Wanted

    The Belted Gazette could use a few more hands-on-deck as we grow our community newspaper. Currently we are looking for a volunteer (or two) to assist the manager with various tasks, such as producing our monthly calendar of events. Good organizational skills, a basic knowledge of MS Word and 2-3 hours a week of your time is all you need. Think you might be a good fit? Contact Manager Ann Melchior at: editors@fearringtonfha.org.

     


    old time food truckFood Trucks at Fearrington!

    Soon you’ll be able to enjoy multiple dinner options right here in Fearrington Village. The Board has agreed to greenlight this endeavor with a 6-week trial period. Trucks will park at The Gathering Place and diners are expected to pick up and dine elsewhere—at home or at a friend’s—definitely not in the Village Center. We are working out the details and coordinating with vendors. When we have dates locked down, we’ll post on the front page of fearringtonfha.org, as well as on Nextdoor. Stay tuned.

    —Deborah Repplier


     

     

    From Our FHA Board

     

     

    water qualityVillage Water Quality: Is it Safe to Drink?

    The Guardian newspaper recently ran a story on Pittsboro’s water quality (“A town’s water is contaminated with ‘forever chemicals’ “). The story was also reported in Consumer Reports, which had combined with the Guardian to investigate the issue. The local newspaper, Chatham News and Record, provided a comprehensive overview.

    It’s a year-old tale about the troublesome level of contaminants in the Haw River, the source of Pittsboro’s drinking water, and how the city will have to develop ways to protect its residents against unsafe levels of exposure. To summarize briefly, water in Pittsboro contains PFAS, a dangerous carcinogen, at something like 80 times the amount of what experts say should be found.

    Many Fearrington Villagers are asking, is our water similarly affected? Is it safe to drink? In answer to the first question, “No, we use county water, taken from Jordan Lake.” The Haw drains into the Cape Fear River just below the Jordan Lake reservoir.

    In answer to the second question, County Commissioner Karen Howard stated, "County water … has not been impacted by the identified contaminants in Pittsboro's drinking water... We are, however, aware of the potential risks to Jordan Lake and are working with our partners who also source water from there (Wake, Cary and Durham) to ensure that proper measures are in place to protect the drinking supply of some 750,000 North Carolinians. It will take collaboration and vigilance to stay ahead of emerging contaminants and we are committed to keeping our water safe.”

    Chatham County maintains an up-to-date report on the quality of its water on its website. This report is a useful reference for anyone who is concerned about the safety of our water.

    —Therese St. Peter

     

     

    Signs of Spring: The Reopening of The Gathering PlaceGathering Place with sign

    As more and more people become vaccinated against Covid-19, signs of a partial return to normality appear. In accord with this trend, The Gathering Place will be open for use by FHA clubs and other FHA organizations, under certain conditions, beginning Monday May 3, 2021.

    Caution is still the watchword. The pandemic is by no means over, but for those who have been fully vaccinated, social activities become less risky. Accordingly, use of The Gathering Place is contingent on groups complying with certain guidelines.

    Any group wanting to rent The Gathering Place must contact Clairbeth Lehn (gp@fearringtonfha.org or 919-542-3003) to book a date and time. The renter must sign the FHA rental agreement and pay rental fees. Groups may have credit from previous unused reservations that they can use.

    The group must agree to comply with the following guidelines. These guidelines are based on current CDC, state, and county guidelines. Please read them carefully and be sure your group can comply.

    1. A maximum of 8 participants is allowed at one time in the small meeting room, and 36 in the main meeting room. No more than 50 people are permitted at one time in the building, including the offices at the rear of the building.

    2. There will be a maximum of three rentals per day, each rental being for one or both rooms.

    3. Only fully vaccinated participants will be allowed to remain in the building. Responsibility for confirming that a person is vaccinated rests with the renting organization. It is recommended that participants keep a photo of their vaccination card on their cell phones for verification purposes.

    4. All participants are required to wear masks while in the building.

    5. All participants must remain at least 3 feet away from all other participants while in the building, or at least 6 feet if engaging in activities that involve heavy breathing such as exercise or singing.

    6. To promote ventilation, the HVAC system must be operated with the circulating fan running continuously. Hospital grade air filters will have been installed in the HVAC system.

    7. The kitchen will be closed. Beverages are permitted in the building, but no food.

    8. Participants must complete a sign-in sheet for tracking purposes. The sheets must be left in a drop box installed beside the FHA office for that purpose. If any participant subsequently tests positive for Covid, the renting organization must inform the business office.

    9. All participants must enter and leave The Gathering Place by the front door, except for participants whose mobility limitations require them to use the rear door.
    10. The renting organization must provide hand sanitizer for participants.

    11. No participant may attend a meeting if they exhibit any Covid symptoms such as loss of taste or smell or having a fever.

    12. The renting organization is responsible for ensuring compliance with these guidelines.

    These guidelines will be reviewed at least once a month. Based on experiences here and elsewhere, they may be relaxed if that seems appropriate. On the other hand, if the pandemic worsens, they may need to be made more stringent.

    Changes in the guidelines will be announced promptly on the FHA website: FHA Home Page (fearringtonfha.org).

     

     

    Shredding EventSpring 3-in-1 Shredding Event

    Mark your Calendars! The Spring 3-in-1 Shredding event is coming up on Saturday, May 15 from 9 am to 12 noon at The Gathering Place. Follow the directions to the first stop, a large Shimar shredding truck which will chew up any documents you may have that need secure disposal. The shredder can also take most folders except for the hanging type that have metal hangers. Please stay in your car and wear a mask. There will be volunteers to take whatever you have to shred right out of your car. This keeps the line moving smoothly. The second stop of the event is The Fire Extinguisher Station where expert staff from United Fire and Safety Equipment Company can check the pressure of your fire extinguisher for free to see if the pressure is still what it needs to be. They can also show you how to safely use your fire extinguisher. If your fire extinguisher does need a refill, they can do that for you for a fee. The third stop is the Chatham County Sherriff’s van where you can safely drop off unused and outdated medicines.

    This very popular event has been organized by volunteers from the FHA Green Scene twice a year for more than ten years and is an expense item in the FHA budget. In recent years the event has been underwritten by SunTrust Bank (now Truist) and by Fearrington resident, Amy Ghiloni, a Realtor with ReMax United.

    —Maggie Tunstall, Former Director of Community Affairs

     

     

    Help Us Make Fearrington an Even Better Place to LiveCow with question

    The recent Community Assessment Survey suggested that a large number of residents consider Fearrington Village a highly desirable place to live, and many are willing to help in keeping it so. Some features stood out as especially important in enhancing the quality of our lives. In the coming months, we hope to develop these features further, making sure they can be maintained, and to address any deficiencies that now exist. To do this we need your help.

    The FHA Long Range Planning Committee (LRPC) has defined four “initiatives” that will become the focal points for future development. The four initiatives, and the LRPC member to contact for more information, are:

    • Walking Paths and Nature Trails: Tony Daniels, tdanielsuk@icloud.com

    • The Gathering Place: Steve Stewart, stewart859@att.net

    • Village Attractiveness and Renewal: Dan Freehling, dan.freehling@gmail.com

    • Aging in Our Community: John Eckblad, johneckblad@gmail.com

    For each of these initiatives, we plan to form a team of volunteers. Each team will be charged with deciding on specific goals that ought to be pursued, how best to achieve the goals, and what might be needed in the way of time and money.

    This will be an enterprise that involves the whole community. We are asking every resident to consider helping with one of the initiatives. More details have been provided in a separate document, which you can find on the FHA website. Each initiative calls for its own set of talents and interests among the team members. Please read the document to find out where you might best be able to help.

    If you are able to invest your time, energy, and abilities over the next three to four months, the LRPC would be delighted to consider your participation in one of these projects. Please contact the person listed as the contact for the initiative that most interests you.

    With your help, we can make Fearrington Village an even better place to live. To reword a well-known aphorism, “Do ask what the FHA can do for you. Then ask how you can help accomplish it.”

     

     

    Hidden Gems on the FHA Websitecomputer screen

    This is another article in the series devoted to the FHA website. It introduces you to some useful information, easily found if you know where to look, yet which is easy to overlook. It is especially valuable to anyone who is new to the village. Here are three of my favorite web pages, each of which can be found under the Info menu (short, of course, for Information).

    Fearrington 101: Who Does What?

    Helene Carlson was a newcomer to Fearrington about two years ago. She discovered there was a complexity to the organization of the village that was hard to understand, and that raised many questions she could not find answers to. Why did she have to pay dues to two organizations? What is the relationship between the FHA and the various service groups? What is a service group anyway?

    Perhaps you have the same questions yourself, especially if you are a newcomer. Thanks to Helene’s investigations, you can find answers in the article Fearrington 101: Who Does What? Besides appearing on the website, the article is now included in the introduction to the printed Directory and Handbook.

    Our History

    As a result of the research that led to Fearrington 101, Helene learned a lot about the history of the village and the FHA. The website already contained an article that had been prepared by Carl Stromee, one of the original residents of Fearrington. The history had been expanded and brought up to date by Jesse Fearrington, Jr., who is the Great Grandson of Edwin Fearrington, who married the daughter of Elijah Cole, grandson of William Cole, Sr., who had purchased the land where the village is located in 1786. Find out more about these people, and what happened when their property was purchased by R.B. and Jennie Fitch.

    Helene took that article and revised it. The article had been hidden on the website as part of the FHA Board Handbook. Now it can be found more easily under Info.

    Village Maps

    To understand a location that I do not know well, I find maps essential. Not only can I use them to navigate; they provide insights into the culture and the ambience of the area.

    The maps on the website include all the street maps you can find in the printed Directory and Handbook. In fact, if we discover errors or omissions in a map, it can be updated on the website long after it appears in print.

    The street maps are supplemented by three maps that show walking paths and nature trails. The availability of walking paths helps make Fearrington a more livable environment. The nature trails (Creekwood and the North Langdon Trail) provide tranquil settings in which we can escape the quotidian demands of our lives. Note that you must be logged in (see March article in this series) to have access to the trail maps.

    One other map is a useful supplement to the Fearrington 101 article. It shows which organization is responsible for any given section of the village—a service group, the FHA, or the developer, Fitch Creations. It’s labeled “Map of FHA and Service Group Owned Properties.”

     


     

    Features

     

     

    Fearrington Puzzler96webApril’s Puzzler & Answer by Jesse Fearrington

    The Belted Goat building is an example of adaptive reuse, changing to meet current needs. Originally, the building was a country store next to a family mill, located at the end of Barnsley. It was moved to its current location when the Fearrington home was built, which now hosts the Fearrington House Restaurant. In the ‘60s and ‘70s, the building protectively stored grain. Times and needs changed and in 1983, it opened as The Market, where basic food items could be purchased. Before it became The Belted Goat, it was The Granary Restaurant, a creative reference to one phase of its multifaceted identity.

     

    May’s Puzzler: Who Am I?

    1. I am a plant and I live in Fearrington, but I prefer coastal areas.
    2. Fossil records show I come from an ancient line.
    3. In youth, I am circular.
    4. During droughts, I look dead.
    5. Sometimes part of me is covered with little brown dots.
    6. I have an affinity for bark.

    What’s my name and where can you see me?

     

    Troubles in Birdland: Bird Feeder Do’s & Don’ts

    By Tad McArdle

    Talk about stressful times! New health risks are showing up almost every day, and many of the birds we love are now besieged.

    Healthy pine siskins congregating at their own feeder
    Photo: Betty Akiba

    When a sickly house finch showed up, all feeders were cleaned and disinfected; feeders for the finches were moved away from the house and dog yard.
    Photo: Betty Akiba

    One specific risk is salmonella (currently infecting pine siskins), which can spread to humans and their pets. Salmonella, according to wildlife expert Bradley W. Parks, can grow in seed feeders when they get wet, and seed-eating birds like pine siskins then spread it through their poop.

    Another risk is FED (Finch Eye Disease, also known as Mycoplasmal conjunctivitis), which has evolved over the years from a pathogen (Mycoplas¬ma gallisepticum) originally limited to native western house finches. It seems to have leapt at one point from its habitat in turkeys and chickens to infect at least one unfortunate visiting finch and is now doing its damage to many species of finch in Fearrington and elsewhere in the area.

    Here is a collection of feeding tips for faithful and conscientious bird nourishers, reminding you that things have changed, and we must adapt with rigor if we want to reduce the percentage of these infections:

    1. When filling your bird feeder, it is recommended that you put in just enough for 1 day at a time, and that you always remove any feed left beneath your feeder.

    2. Choose a food that targets a specific species in order to prevent diverse crowding at feeders. Diversity is fine as an aspiration for human societies but apparently quite dangerous for hungry birds, according to the Audubon Society, as it increases the risk of interchanging disease among bird species.

    Birds

    Adding suet feeders for birds like this northern flicker (left) and different types of feeding stations for birds like this cardinal (right) and blue jay (center) decreases the possibility of contamination.
    Photo: Betty Akiba

    3. A recommendation from Portland Audubon is to take down feeders for two weeks at a time to force birds to discover new and natural food sources.

    4. While the feeders are down, always wash them with soap and water, then spray them with a 10% bleach solution. Let feeders sit for 10 minutes before rinsing; allow sufficient time to dry. Some recommend cleaning feeders once a week.

    5. If you find a dead bird, wear gloves, and use two layers of plastic bag for disposal of each bird, as infections can spread easily from the carcass.

    6. Avoid contact with bird droppings, for the same reason.

    7. DO NOT attempt to medicate birds; this will allow infected birds to survive longer and spread illness.

    These recommendations could do a lot to minimize or even help bring an end to this sad situation; our feathered friends may or may not directly appreciate our work, but we can certainly appreciate their zippy ways and enjoy the liveliness good health brings to all creatures.

    Bird-Feeding Resources:

    Audubon North Carolina:
    https://nc.audubon.org/

    Claws, Inc. (Wildlife rehablitation):
    https://www.nc-claws.org/

    Southern States—Carrboro:
    https://www.southernstates.com/farm-store/store-locations/75647

    Wild Bird Center of Chapel Hill:
    https://www.wildbird.com/chapelhill/

    Wild Birds Unlimited:
    https://chapelhill.wbu.com/

    Mason Farm Biological Reserve:
    https://ncbg.unc.edu/venue/mason-farm-biological-reserve/

     

    A native of rural western PA, Tad McArdle has lived in Fearrington since 2010 and lives happily with his wife, Mary Roodkowsky, on North Langdon. Tad’s interests include writing, golf, the poetry of Emily Dickinson and Wallace Stevens, physical fitness, Latin and African percussion, and providing quick and simple solutions to the major problems facing humanity (any suggestions?).


     

     

    PORCHLogo Community fearrington smallFearrington Residents & PORCH—
    An Amazing Partnership

    By Tad McArdle

    Want a simple way to do an amazing amount of good? Fearringtonians have no doubt heard of CORA, an organization that works hard and wonderfully well to provide food and other supplies to needy people in our area. CORA stands for Chatham Outreach Alliance, and dates from July 1989, when it provided food to one family of six. CORA has really taken off since then—in 2019-2020 it distributed 1.3 million meals, serving 57,530 people in need.

    Intrigued? Impressed? Well, there is an organization right here in Fearrington, dating from 2011, known as PORCH (People Offering Relief for Chapel Hill/Carrboro Homes), which is, as its website states, “CORA’s largest single contributor of residentially donated food.” Go to PORCH’s website (PORCH-Fearrington), and you may be startled by what you learn there. For instance, over the past ten years, PORCH has “collected and delivered 121.3 tons of food.” (In the form of a roadside line of bananas placed end-to-end, this amount would stretch from the Pittsboro Courthouse almost all the way to Mt. Airy, a distance of 103 miles.)

    I learned a lot from their website and from interviewing Rosalyn Darling, who founded PORCH in 2011, and Karen Shectman, who has worked as a neighborhood “coordinator” (she prefers to call herself a “PORCH person”) from the time of its founding. Roz told me that it was 2011 when she saw an article in the News & Observer describing how three Chapel Hill women (Christine Cotton, Debbie Horwitz, and Susan Romaine) had come up with a great idea: “If you make it easy for people to donate to food pantries by just having to put the food out on their own porch, then you’ll get a lot of donations!”

    PORCH group at CORA

    Photo from CORA files
    PORCH volunteers unloading bags to hand over to CORA. (Left to right) Carol Wilson, Roz Darling, Donna Fehrenbach, Hilary Murry, and Jon Darling. All are (or were) Fearrington residents.

    Roz continued: “I called one of the three women in Chapel Hill, then went to meet with them. All three of them came, they talked about how they did it, and I thought it would work here. They were very helpful; they had all kinds of ideas, and so I first mentioned it at a Havurah meeting, which is the Jewish cultural organization in Fearrington, and asked whether there were any people interested in being able to coordinate their neighborhoods, because that’s how this program works. Now we have 27 coordinators all over the village. I started with 17 neighborhood coordinators, and then it just took off and grew.”

    Karen says she gets a huge kick out of Roz’s monthly report which states how much food has been donated. Roz told me that on one recent morning they collected over 3,000 pounds of food from Fearrington and over $2,000 in cash and checks. Karen thinks they should “take a picture of the food collection every month, as they remove it from the truck. A ton of food sounds like a lot, but what does it look like?”

    Jones Grove Cemetery

    Photo from CORA files
    West Camden coordinators, Vicki and David Fields, and the two CORA drivers, during the January 2021 collection

    According to Roz, the logistics of PORCH are as follows: “I send an email once a month to all the neighborhood coordinators, and then they send emails to their neighbors reminding them of the PORCH date and letting them know if there is any special thing that CORA needs. Then on PORCH day, their neighbors put their food out. Now it varies by neighborhood. In some neighborhoods, people just put it out on their front porch, which is actually the preferred model, and then the coordinators go around and pick it up and bring it back to their house and leave it on their own porch; in larger neighborhoods, that’s not feasible, so people are asked to 

    bring the food over to the coordinator’s porch.” Before the pandemic there were three Fearrington drivers who went around and picked up all the food from the neighborhood coordinators’ porches and took it to CORA. But once the pandemic started, CORA wanted to reduce the number of person-to-person contacts. So, the CORA truck has been doing all of the pickups.

    Karen has noticed that in recent months there has been an increase in requests for beans, rice, masa harina, and other staples. Roz says one reason for some of the need in Chatham County is the closing of local poultry and meat processing plants. According to a News & Observer article in April 2020, the coronavirus has caused the closing of many such plants in our state, including Mountaire Farms in Siler City. And many of the workers there were Latinx. Roz continued, “There really wasn’t anyplace else to find a job if you didn’t have a lot of skills; and as you probably know, even if you have work, a lot of places around here, like fast food establishments, don’t pay a living wage. So, a lot of people who work are also poor.”

    Both women agreed that Fearrington Village has been wonderfully generous with contributions to PORCH. Said Roz: “Every month we DO IT; we have amazing coordinators. Some of the neighborhoods collect an incredible amount of food. We had one coordinator who was in her 90s, and when her husband was alive, they went around with a garden wagon that they bought specifically for this purpose. They walked around their neighborhood and picked up people’s bags and brought them back to their house. I’m impressed and amazed by these people’s dedication.” Karen added, “I wish, frankly, that a lot of these efforts would translate into changes in our government’s policy toward food insufficiency. But until that happens, thank heavens we’ve got CORA and PORCH.”

    So if you’re interested, visit the PORCH website (PORCH-Fearrington) and find your neighborhood coordinator (Coordinators - PORCH-Fearrington). The statistics are astonishing, and the amounts are trending upward as needs increase.

     

     

    Scene Around Fearrington96LPweb

    Minnie Gallman grew up in rural Ohio where her love of nature began. When she moved to Fearrington about six years ago, she began using her camera to capture the beauty of nature in North Carolina. Minnie took these pictures this spring as she walked around Fearrington. Gallman mused, "Flowers appeared everywhere—hidden in the woods, showy blossoms on a tree, or in carefully cultivated gardens. Their vibrant color palette and aromas make everyone smile." The most unusual flower she found was the Edgeworthia chrysantha, also known as a paperbush plant, which smells like honeysuckle. Others, such as the camellia and the poppy, are more familiar.

    Photos by Minnie Gallman (minnie-gallman.pixels.com).

    Minnie GallmanMay96Web Copy

     

     


     

    Announcements

     

    Fearrington Groups and Organizations


     

    Bulls BearsFearrington Bulls & Bears

    The Fearrington Bulls & Bears Investment Club is a group of Fearrington residents who are interested in improving their investment knowledge and capabilities. We meet monthly during non-summer months and communicate regularly through email exchanges. We strive to share information, insights and ideas about investing.

    Guests are welcome to participate in a meeting to gauge their interest in joining the club. The next meeting, and the last before our summer break, will be held by Zoom on May 14 at 9:30 am.

    For more information about the club or to join our meeting, please contact:

    Anna Shearer, President, at 703-217-0322 or ashearer1219@gmail.com.

     

     

    Fearrington Democratic ClubFearrington Dem Club Sm

    The Fearrington Democratic Club is currently planning new programs to begin in September, but we may have a few surprises over the summer, so watch upcoming Belted Gazettes and Galloway Heards or the mail kiosks.

     

     

    Mah JonggMay Mah Jongg!!

    The Dragons are Back!

    Fearrington Dragons Mah Jongg plays on the second Saturday of the month from 1-4 pm. We will start back on Saturday, May 8, at 1 pm. We meet at The Gathering Place and will play under their guidelines. (Read the policy.)

    As such we must limit our number to 36. (Sign up for a space.) Because of this limitation, it is important to cancel if you discover you are not able to play so someone else can take your spot. Annual dues have been waived for 2021.

    Bring your own beverage; no food is allowed.

    These games are for experienced players.

    Contact Robin Weinberger at weinrob@msn.com or 919-219-5228 or Polly Williams at pw82550@gmail.com or 919-478-4260 if you have any questions.

    Want to learn how to play? Contact Mary Donna Pond at mdpond@nc.rr.com.

     

     

    Fearrington Duplicate Bridge Clubduplicate bridge

    “If Bridge is just a game, then the Grand Canyon is just a hole in Arizona.”

    Wednesday, May 5, we will begin Duplicate Bridge here in Fearrington every Wednesday at 1 pm at The Gathering Place for the next four months (May, June, July, and August).

    We are a diverse group of players with varying abilities. When you are scored, it is against others who play at the same level that you do. We have a director who helps us abide by the ACBL rules. Many of our folks will explain what they might have done differently, but only if you ask. We are a fun-loving group who are anxious to see each other and play bridge once again. We do use bidding boxes.

    We will be abiding by the FHA guidelines for the use of the Gathering Place. PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE bring your vaccination card or verification on your cell phone. After the first time you present it, your name will go on a list, and we will only ask new participants for verification of vaccination. We will supply the list of participants weekly to the FHA office in case tracking of a COVID outbreak is necessary. The air conditioning will be on to help air circulation so remember to bring a sweater if you need one.

    We are to wear masks while in the building and stay a minimum of three feet from one another when at all possible. We will serve no food; if you get thirsty, please bring your own drink. We will have hand sanitizer at each table. If you wish to wear gloves, feel free to do so. Please, if you are not feeling well, enjoy a good bridge book at home.

    The cost for playing is $7. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to reach me at jeanshjelle@gmail.com.

     

     

    Fearrington Garden Club logoFearrington Garden Club

    The Garden Club is pleased to partner with the Women of Fearrington for a wonderful outing to the Lavender Oaks Farm, outside Chapel Hill. We'll meet there on Tuesday, May 25, 11:30 am -1:30 pm for lunch and a tour. The cost is $30.00 per person. COVID guidelines will be observed. Please watch for an email from the Garden Club for details on signing up for this fun event.

    You can check out the farm's website here: https://lavenderoaks.farm/.

     

     

    Fearrington Genealogy GroupFearrington Genealogy Group

    Tuesday, May 11, 3:00 pm, Zoom teleconference
    Presentation by club member Eddie Price: Introduction to Family Book Creator (FBC)

    Eddie, a long-time genealogist and Village resident will present his experience using Family Book Creator to publish a book of his family history. Many of us aspire to publish our research results in book format to preserve our hard work for succeeding generations. However, in most cases, the problem is that nearly everyone plans to begin their book production as soon as the research is done. In reality the research is never completed, and consequently, a book is never published. That is exactly where the Family Book Creator (FBC) program comes in. It allows the creation of family books by just pressing a button. It only requires that the family data is being stored in the Family Tree Maker application (Personal Computer only and not Apple). Therefore, you need both programs (FTM and FBC) to make it work. You will find that viewing your research results in book format will give you new insights into your family history. FBC is a good tool that allows you to pass on your research results to future generations, simply by using the family data you have already entered into your Family Tree Maker database.

    Newcomers are welcome. Contact Li